michigan state board of education

Politics & Government
1:14 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

State Board of Education opposes snow-day bill

A new bill may change how schools make up lost instruction time due to snow days.
user echsunderscore Flickr

The State Board of Education is recommending Michigan public school districts add additional days, not additional hours, to the school year to make up for this year’s snow days.

Last year, Gov. Rick Snyder signed a bill allowing districts exceeding the state's snow day limit to add hours to class time instead of extra days.

But the law only applied for the 2012-2013 school year.

Now legislators in Lansing are trying to extend that option indefinitely with House Bill 5285.

State Rep. Phil Potvin, R-Cadillac, a sponsor of the bill, says districts who choose to make up for lost instruction time will have to add a minimum of 30 minutes to the school day.

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Education
9:26 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Michigan legislators seeking to create 'Wild West' of unregulated schools?

Capitol in Lansing
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

State Board of Education President John Austin published a commentary in MLive yesterday.

He's raises big concerns over a series of education overhaul bills working their way through Michigan's lame duck legislative session.

Austin writes these bills have the potential to upend Michigan's public school system.

These would allow a host of new schools and learning venues to be created. Working together, these proposals would replace a coherent education reform strategy—that has enjoyed bipartisan support, with a “Wild West” of unfettered, unregulated new school creation, decoupled from the goal of improving learning and student outcomes.

If implemented, it could erode or destroy completely our current public schools and education system in favor of a chaotic, often for-profit-provided education marketplace.

This legislation creates an unlimited and largely unregulated marketplace of new online schools, for-profit-run schools, schools run by businesses, universities, community organizations, and municipal governments. It would allow new authorizers to create schools in any location, for any reason, with little oversight.

If the bills aim to create a robust school choice marketplace, Austin writes, then the bills should explicitly say this.

He says debate should then occur as to whether all families in Michigan would truly have access to all the options.

The bills he's questioning are HB 6004, SB 1358, and a "yet to be introduced financing bill."

Education
6:30 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Governor’s annual education summit to meet in East Lansing

The 17th annual Governor's Education Summit is set for today in East Lansing
WoodleyWonderWorks Flickr

State officials, teachers, school administrators and researchers will mingle today at a day-long education conference in East Lansing. This will be the 17th annual Governor’s Education Summit.

Last year, Governor Rick Snyder called for an overhaul of education and how teachers do their jobs.

A lot of the sessions will focus on flexibility in classrooms and helping teachers and students meet new performance expectations. Also, strategies to create an education system that starts with pre-school and continues through college or job training.

Democrat John Austin is the president of the Michigan State Board of Education. He says Michigan needs to do a better job of making education past high school accessible and worthwhile.

“We said everybody needs a post-secondary degree, not a high school degree, and we’ve been dis-investing in our community colleges and our universities in this state for a dozen years," Austin says.

Republican Lt. Gov. Brian Calley will also address the conference on different strategies for improving Michigan schools.

Education
6:31 am
Wed March 9, 2011

State Superintendent Mike Flanagan to stay on the job

The Michigan Board of Education has extended the contract of state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan, the Associated Press reports. The AP reports:

The decision means Flanagan will remain on the job until 2014. The extension doesn't come with a salary increase for Flanagan, who currently earns $183,995.

Flanagan was first appointed State Superintendent of Public Instruction in 2005.