Michigan State University

Politics & Government
8:34 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Federal government shutdown threatens pollination study at Michigan State University

Rufus Isaacs in his lab on the MSU campus. He heads the Integrated Crop Pollination project.
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The federal government shutdown is threatening a project at Michigan State University that could be critical to the future of agriculture in the U.S.

It’s one of many university research projects affected by the shutdown.

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Law
5:18 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

After lawsuit, Isabella County jail inmates get more time outside cells

user FatMandy flickr

Isabella County jail inmates are spending more time outside their cells these days.

The American Civil Liberties Union sued Isabella County after receiving complaints that inmates were not allowed exercise time outside their cells.

Daniel Manville is the director the Michigan State University law school's Civil Rights Clinic. He says jail officials were willing to reach an out-of-court settlement. Manville says many county jails in Michigan are in a similar position because of inmate overcrowding and budget cuts.

“It’s my understanding that there's a few other jails that are under litigation,” says Manville. “We’ve even started talking to a couple jails about making changes, and they are willing to sit down even before we file a lawsuit and we may even be able to resolve it without a lawsuit.”

As part of the Isabella County jail settlement, inmates will have access to an exercise room for an hour a day five days a week.

Agriculture
9:49 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Michigan apple growers scramble to harvest potential record-setting crop

Rob Steffens is a 4th generation apple farmer in Sparta, Michigan.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Rob Steffens palms a Fuji apple nearly the size of a softball in the middle of his 280-acre apple orchard near Sparta in Kent County’s “fruit ridge.”

“This block here is really going to pick heavy this year,” Steffens says, smiling at a row of stubby trees. The branches are heavy with near ripe fruit.

“This is just gorgeous size fruit on here,” he said. “It’s going to be a real shame if we can’t get this crop harvested and in the barn.”

Steffens is just one of many apple growers scrambling to take care of what’s potentially the biggest crop in Michigan’s history.

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Education
9:07 am
Wed September 25, 2013

Michigan universities are waiting to see how a federal government shutdown may affect them

Students walk to and from class on the East Lansing campus of Michigan State University (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The clock is ticking closer to a federal government shutdown.

Spokespeople for several Michigan universities say they're waiting to see what kind of an effect a federal government shutdown may have on their institutions.

Michigan’s universities and colleges get hundreds of millions of dollars from the federal government every year.

But it’s unclear how much, if any, of that money will actually be held up if the government does shut down.  

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Arts & Culture
9:46 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

MSU alumnus plans to show off his private art collection to the public for free

Eli Broad (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

LOS ANGELES (AP) - For years Eli Broad has said he wants to make his vast, collection of contemporary art accessible to the largest number of people possible.

What better way to do that, the billionaire philanthropist said Tuesday, than to make admission free to the $140 million museum he's building in downtown Los Angeles.

When it opens next year, Broad said during a hard-hat tour of the half-completed building, people will be able to walk in and view works by Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha and scores of others without paying a cent.

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Stateside
6:30 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Michigan State prof. brings Creole jazz to East Lansing

Etienne Charles.
Michigan State University

When you think of East Lansing, you probably don’t think about the sounds of Creole Louisiana.

But Etienne Charles might be changing that. A trumpeter from Trinidad, Charles is now an Associate Professor of Jazz Studies at Michigan State University. His latest album, “Creole Soul,” has been described as both “easy to listen to” and “intellectually sound” by The New York Times, blending sounds from the Caribbean, New Orleans and Midwestern R&B.

Despite his rich repertoire of jazz, Charles got a late start to the genre.

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Opinion
8:27 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is ranting in university classrooms free speech?

Lessenberry essay for 9/6/13

One of this week’s more sensational stories involved a Michigan State University professor who was removed from teaching after delivering an inflammatory rant to a large lecture classroom, remarks somebody videotaped.

When the video surfaced, Republicans went ballistic. Many demanded that William Penn, a tenured professor of creative writing, be fired. Michigan State officials didn’t do that, and probably couldn’t. Originally, the whole point of tenure was to prevent someone from being fired for unpopular opinions.

However, State did yank Penn out of the classroom. He will continue to be paid, and presumably expected to continue his research and committee work, but someone else will teach his courses. The question is, how should we feel about this?

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Politics & Government
7:29 am
Fri September 6, 2013

In this morning's headlines: Medical marijuana, MSU prof rant, auction house back at DIA

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

PTSD and insomnia patients urge medial marijuana panel to allow use

"A state advisory board heard overwhelming testimony in favor of approving medical marijuana for patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and insomnia. The board is considering ailments not already included under Michigan’s voter-approved medical marijuana law," Jake Neher reports.

MSU pulls professor from classroom for anti-Republican rant

"A Michigan State University professor has been pulled from the classroom, after a conservative group posted a video online that showed him delivering an anti-Republican rant during a class," Steve Carmody reports.

Auction house comes to the DIA again

Detroit newspapers are reporting that Christie's Auction House visited the Detroit Institute of Art for the second time yesterday to appraise the museum's collection. Detroit's financial situation has raised concerns about whether the Detroit Institute of Arts' collection might be at risk of sale. However Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr has said he has "no plans to use art to relieve  the liquidity crisis that the city is in now."

Education
2:32 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Michigan State University yanks professor from classroom after his anti-Republican rant goes viral

Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

A Michigan State University professor has been pulled from the classroom, after a conservative group posted a video online that showed William Penn delivering an anti-Republican rant during a class.

Here's that video:

Penn teaches creative writing at MSU, or at least he did until this week.

A student posted the video. Penn is seen during a classroom lecture repeatedly making derogatory remarks against Republicans.

In the video, Penn can be heard calling Republicans “racist” and saying they “raped this country.”  The video has drawn the ire of conservatives.

Michigan State University released a statement saying Penn met with university officials and “acknowledged that some of his comments were inappropriate, disrespectful and offensive and may have negatively affected the learning environment.”

The statement goes on to say Penn’s teaching duties have been “reassigned.”  

Education
1:53 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

MSU study finds victims of dating violence earn less later in life

my.hsj.org

A new Michigan State University study finds adolescent victims of dating violence pay a price later in life.

About one in three people between the ages of 14 and 20 say they've been of victims of dating violence.

The MSU research shows dating violence tended to limit women’s education

As a consequence, the women earned less money and saw less growth in their income.

MSU researcher Adrienne Adams says the study’s findings show the need for early intervention.

Health
2:19 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Flint is looking for the right prescription to cure its downtown's woes

Genesys Health System opened its new clinic in downtown Flint this month
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

What’s being called an ‘Eds and Meds’ strategy is paying off for people trying to revitalize Flint’s downtown.

Many downtown buildings in Flint are empty. But local economic development leaders say they are making progress by attracting educational and medical investment.

The ‘Eds and Meds’ strategy is intended to not only bring in jobs, but also create activity and excitement, in a downtown in need of all three.

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Environment & Science
12:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Michigan State University developing a new way of producing energy down on the farm

MSU's new South Campus Anaerobic Digester
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan State University’s dairy farm is helping the university cut down on its electricity bill. It may also someday help small Michigan farms meet their energy needs.

South of the East Lansing campus, MSU maintains about 180 dairy cows. The cows produce more than milk of course. Now, university researchers have something to do with all that waste.

University officials this week cut the ribbon on an anaerobic digester. The digester takes organic waste and creates methane. The methane can be used to create electricity or meet other energy needs.

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Arts & Culture
12:05 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

East Lansing exhibit marks 1938 Michigan recording tour

Alan Lomax
Shirley Collins/American Folklife Center/Library of Congress

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The Great Lakes Folk Festival in East Lansing on Sunday will be the first stop of a traveling exhibit celebrating the 75th anniversary of a song collecting tour through the Upper Midwest.

The Lansing State Journal reports that it commemorates a trip that began in Detroit on Aug. 1, 1938, by 23-year-old Alan Lomax. He carried a recorder and movie camera to gather folk music. Lomax was in charge of the Library of Congress's Archive of American Folk-Song.

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Sports
12:33 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Michigan State University hosting the World Dwarf Games beginning Saturday

Australian athletes Samantha Lily (R) and Erica Peter hug during the swimming competition at the World Dwarf Games in Larne Leisure centre, twenty miles north of Belfast, July 28,2009.
ibnlive.in.com

Michigan State University is hosting the quadrennial World Dwarf Games.

The Olympics-style athletic event is drawing more than 400 athletes from 17 countries.

Mike Cekanor is with the Dwarf Athletic Association of America. He says the games are a great showcase for dwarf athletes.

“I think in a lot of ways at times are athletes are overlooked,” says Cekanor, “But at the same time, I think when folks really get to know and appreciate what our athletes are capable of that they are very well respected.”

Stateside
9:42 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

New MSU study looks into the effects of dioxins on human health

Imerman Park sits on the flood plain of the Tittabawassee River. Signs along the trail warn walkers about dioxin contamination in some of the park's soil.
Photo by Shawn Allee

An interview with Norbert Kaminski, director of Michigan State University's Center for Integrative Toxicology.

Dioxins are environmental pollutants that are known to be toxic to many animal species, and since dioxins work their way up the food chain, there needs to be a clearer understanding of their effects on humans.

That's why we wanted you to know about a more than $14 million study being launched at Michigan State University. Researchers hope to get a better idea of how dioxins affect human health and they hope to figure out new ways of removing them from the environment.

Norbert Kaminski directs Michigan State University's Center for Integrative Toxicology and he is the lead researcher in this major study. He joined us today from the campus in East Lansing.

Listen to the full interview above.

Mental Health
3:22 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Mental illness research discovery could help treat schizophrenic symptoms

Credit flickr.com

Schizophrenia affects nearly 2.4 million Americans. The mental disorder enables patients to feel like they are "hearing voices," and have difficulty with change.

Now, Michigan State University researchers have made a discovery that could help treat some symptoms of Schizophrenia. While current antipsychotic drugs are able to reduce hallucinations, the new study finds information that may eventually help patients cope with other symptoms. These include trouble responding to change, lack of motivation, and the inability to experience pleasure.

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Politics & Culture
5:43 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Should garages be able to be turned into living spaces? It's happening in Dearborn and a possible clampdown in city ordinances is causing concern.

Plus, how much land should we preserve for our kids and grandkids? We took a look at one group that's successfully saving northern Michigan's natural treasures.

And, we spoke with a former Marine sniper-scout who's now a student at Michigan State University. He’s made a film to honor his fallen comrades.

Also, Pat Kelly, the granddaughter of the longest-serving lighthouse keeper on South Manitou Island, joined us to talk about the special lighthouse tour happening tomorrow.

First on the show, there has been a firestorm of protest in Highland Park after the discovery that a collection of history books, film and tapes from the city's high school was tossed in the trash.

Some 50 protestors gathered outside the high school in Highland Park, a member of the school board quit, and several people climbed into dumpsters to retrieve what they could.

The protests focused not only on the discarded books but on the way Highland Park School District's emergency manager Donald Weatherspoon is running things.

We started by turning to one of those people who searched through the dumpsters to retrieve as many books as possible. He is a Highland Park resident and an historian who helped build the collection of black history books, videos and movies.

Paul Lee joined us today from Highland Park.

Stateside
4:06 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

MSU student produces documentary dedicated to casualties of Operation Enduring Freedom

Logan Stark is the producer of the documentary "For the 25."
Twitter

An interview with former Marine sniper Logan Stark.

In October 2010, the 3rd Battalion 5th Marines deployed to Afghanistan. They were sent to relieve the British Royal Marines in the southern Helmand Province, a hotbed of insurgent fighters and IEDs.

Twenty-five Marines in the 3rd Battalion 5th Marines did not come home.

One of those who did come home went on to become a student at Michigan State University. Former Marine sniper Logan Stark is now a senior in MSU's Professional Writing Program.

As a class project, Logan formed a three-member team that produced a documentary called "For the 25" dedicated to his fallen brothers in the "Dark Horse" battalion, which suffered the highest number of casualties in 2010 during Operation Enduring Freedom.

Logan Stark joined us in the studio today.

You can watch "For the 25" below.

Listen to the full interview above.

Environment & Science
8:57 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Michigan State University to study dioxins and human health

Michigan State University campus, East Lansing, Michigan (file campus
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan State University is getting  $14 million to study how dioxins affect human health.

MSU researchers will look for ways to remove dioxins from the environment and reach out to communities burdened with the toxic pollutants.

Dioxin contamination has been a problem in parts of Michigan, including along the Tittabawassee and Kalamazoo Rivers.

Norbert Kaminski is heading up the multi-disciplinary study. He notes that dioxins have been linked to illnesses like cancer.

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Education
2:07 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Rolling back a student loan rate increase on Congress' agenda this week

Students on the Michigan State University campus (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Congress could act this week to roll back an interest rate hike on a student loan program that many Michigan college students use.

The interest rate doubled for federally subsidized Stafford loans on July 1st.   

The rate went from 3.4% to 6.8%.

Michigan Senator Debbie Stabenow says the federal government will make a $50 billion profit from the student loan interest rate hike.

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