WUOMFM

Morning Edition

Model Ts driving on a road
KMS Photography

What do your mornings sound like? Which sounds shape the start your day?

Our new series, Mornings In Michigan features the sounds of morning rituals from people and places across our state.

Mackinac Bridge
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

This week, Enbridge Energy reported the protective coating has worn off of it's Line 5 pipeline in more spots than previously revealed. Line 5 is the oil and gas pipeline that runs under the straits of Mackinac. The new report says there were 8 spots of bare metal and seven of them will be repaired before winter sets in. A state commission has called Enbridge to testify next month.

Michigan Radio's Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about possible solutions.

Every Michigander's morning is unique. A cherry farmer might be shaking trees at 6 a.m. Bus drivers and teachers are busy making sure students are in their seats on time. Some of us might just be sleeping in.

For Doug Tribou, mornings mean waking up at 3:20 a.m. to host Morning Edition on Michigan Radio.

Morning Edition is launching a new series, Mornings in Michigan, and we want to hear from you! What do your mornings look and sound like?

graffiti saying "vote"
Flickr user H2Woah! / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

Michigan Radio's Morning Edition host Doug Tribou, and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss some of yesterday's election results.

highway sign East Lansing Home of Michigan State University
Flickr user kenlund / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 7, and voters in East Lansing will decide whether to add a citywide income tax.

The main goal is to pay down about $200 million in long-term debt mainly stemming from legacy costs, which include employee retirement benefits.

Michigan State University has lobbied against the ballot proposal in East Lansing. A group of university students, business owners and income tax critics also oppose it. 

Only about a third of all states in the U.S., plus the District of Columbia, allow local income taxes.

arrow sign says voting
Flickr user justgrimes / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Election Day in Michigan is Tuesday, November 7. Michigan Radio's "Morning Edition" host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry preview some of the issues for voters around the state: 

sunrise fishing on Lake Huron
U.S. Department of the Interior

A new study says African-American kids in Michigan fare worse than children of color anywhere else in the country when it comes to education and other benchmarks. Some advocates say that means it’s time to start acknowledging we need policies that give extra help to minority children.

Michigan Radio's "Morning Edition" host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss what that approach might look like.

black and white headshot of author
Courtesy Gasper Tringale

Jeffrey Eugenides was born in Detroit in 1960, and later moved to Grosse Pointe. Since high school, Eugenides has lived in New York, Chicago, Berlin and many other places, but the influence of growing up in Michigan filters into many of his works. Detroit plays a major role in his novel Middlesex, which won the 2003 Pultizer Prize for fiction. Eugenides also set his debut novel The Virgin Suicides in metro Detroit.

row of young men in front of bus
Old News, Ann Arbor District Library

Over the past couple of weeks, people across the country have been looking back at a painful chapter in U.S. history: the Vietnam War. The conflict is the subject of a new 10-part PBS documentary by Lynn Novick and Ann Arbor native Ken Burns.

Michigan Radio's Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry look at the role Michganders played in Vietnam and the war's ongoing legacy in the state.

Sergiodlarosa via Wikimedia Commons / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

A construction crew working at a housing development site south of Grand Rapids in late August uncovered an underground surprise: the bones of a prehistoric creature that walked the earth 11,000-14,000 years ago during the Ice Age. Those bones belonged to an American mastodon and now they’ve been donated to the Museum of Paleontology at the University of Michigan. 

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan lawmakers are back in the capital after a two-month summer break, and they have a long list of items on their legislative to-do list. Among them are an overhaul of no-fault auto insurance, new recycling standards, and the possibility of a rare veto override. 

Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with the Michigan Public Radio Network's Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta about the Legislature’s top priorities this fall. 

sign that says "DEFEND DACA"
Flickr user Harrie van Veen https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

President Donald Trump announced yesterday that he'll end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program in six months. Gov. Rick Snyder issued a statement opposing the move and urged Congress to act quickly to clarify the status of so-called "DREAMers."

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss how pressure from Snyder and other governors could affect decisions made by Congress. 

Person on bicycle riding in an urban area.
Thomas Hawk / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A few weeks ago in Portage a pickup driver struck a cyclist from behind. The cyclist died. That case has Michigan’s bicycling community thinking of another crash that happened in August 2016. That's when a driver tried to pass another car on a rural road west of Ann Arbor, but hit and killed triathlete Karen McKeachie who was riding a bicycle in the opposite direction.

flooded street in Midland
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

As people in Texas and Louisiana struggle to deal with the impact of Harvey, the storm is also generating new conversations about how to deal with flooding in other parts of the country.

Mid-Michigan is still recovering from floods in late June, and many Michigan cities have had problems in recent years.

Rush our traffic on US-23
YouTube Screen grab / MDOT

For most people, a speeding ticket means a grumpy day and a painful check to put in the mail. But for Michigan drivers, it often means paying the original ticket, plus another fee assessed by the state.

Depending on the violation, that fee can be assessed more than once over a number of years, and those fees can snowball. Right now, more than 317,000 Michiganders owe an average of around $1,800 in driver responsibility fees. If they can’t pay up, they risk having their driver's license suspended.

sign that says "vote here"
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Radio Morning Edition Host Doug Tribou and Senior News Analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the results of yesterday's primary elections in Detroit, Flint and Pontiac. 

child holds onto a fence that surrounds a refugee camp
User Jordi Bernabeu Farrús / Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A small group of children fleeing violence in their home countries is stuck in limbo. They've been paired with American foster families, including some in Michigan.

But they can't come to the U.S. because of President Donald Trump's revised travel ban, which affects people from six predominantly Muslim countries and temporarily bans all refugees. 

The children are part of the unaccompanied refugee minor program, which was created in the 1980s to help thousands of displaced children from Southeast Asia. 

aerial shot of buildings, soccer stadium
Rossetti

Wayne County is a step closer to letting its unfinished jail in Detroit become a $1 billion development that would include a pro soccer stadium. The county is working to finalize details with businessman Dan Gilbert. In exchange for the jail site, Gilbert would construct a new criminal justice center near I-75 in the city.

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the deal and whether major league soccer would be successful in Detroit. 

buildings in downtown detroit
Flickr user ifmuth

The riots of July 1967 are not at the root of the problems that lead to Detroit’s decline. However, they do provide an exclamation point in the much larger story about the struggles the city has now faced for decades, including unemployment, poverty and decaying infrastructure.

For our series, "Summer of Rebellion," Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Wayne State University professor Robin Boyle about the legacy of that time period. Boyle has taught urban planning at Wayne State University for the past 25 years. He's also done extensive research on the Detroit and other Midwestern cities dealing with population declines. 

Black and white shot of destroyed buildings in Detroit in 1967.
The Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library

As part of our series, "Summer of Rebellion," Michigan Radio Senior News Analyst Jack Lessenberry shares his memories of the unrest in Detroit in July 1967 with Morning Edition host Doug Tribou. They also discuss the role that week's events played in Detroit's larger decline.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Almost everyone agrees that good teachers are important for our children. However, how those teachers should be compensated can lead to heated debates. Take, for example, the one that just happened over the new teacher retirement system approved in the latest state budget.

Michigan Radio’s Jennifer Guerra is taking an in-depth look at how we go about paying teachers in Michigan and what it means for teacher performance and retention in the state. 

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A group called Voters Not Politicians is trying to get a question about gerrymandering on the 2018 statewide ballot. Gerrymandering refers to the process of drawing voting districts to favor certain politicians or populations. Their plan would create a 13-member citizens panel to oversee redistricting. It would be made up of five independent voters, four Democrats, and four Republicans. 

Senior political analyst Jack Lessenberry talks to Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about how this ballot initiative could change current voting districts.

black and white photo of people rioting in downtown Detroit
Walter P. Reuther Library: Wayne State University

Describing events is tricky business. It’s something we do a lot in the news, and one word can completely change the tone of a story. 

Michigan Radio is marking the 50th anniversary of the unrest that happened in Detroit with a two-week series on "Morning Edition" and "Stateside." But what do we – and should we – call the events of 1967? And how do those choices affect our view of this important part of Michigan’s history?

An artists' vision of Little Caesars Arena.
Olympia Entertainment

Last month, Detroit city council approved $34.5 million in bonds to help pay for the Pistons move to Little Caesars Arena. That property-tax money would have gone to schools, but will now be reimbursed to the teams' owners. Now, the NBA and the companies that own the Detroit Pistons and Red Wings have been added to a federal lawsuit against Detroit's public school district.

Activist Robert Davis filed the lawsuit. He says Detroiters should've been allowed to vote on how their tax money is used. Senior political analyst Jack Lessenberry tells "Morning Edition" host Doug Tribou whether he thinks Davis has a chance of winning the case. 


exterior of kalamazoo county courthouse
Charles W. Chapman / Wikimedia Commons, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en

More than 1,800 rape kits had gone untested when the state attorney general’s office announced the results of a survey last year. That survey included all of the counties in Michigan except Wayne County. Last month, Kalamazoo County tested 194 rape kits. Some of them were 30 years old.  The testing cost the county $144,000 in state funds.