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The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution reads, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

Yet, in January, Congress and the President extended warrantless surveillance of phone calls, emails, personal Facebook pages and messages, permitting the National Security Agency (NSA) to spy on U.S. citizens for six more years.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The Michigan congressman who heads the House Intelligence committee won't comment on new complaints about alleged U.S. spying.  

France and Germany are angry at reports the U.S. bugged the offices of the European Union.     The allegations are tied to the recent leaks from a former National Security Agency staffer.

Brighton Congressman Mike Rogers chairs the House Intelligence committee.   He says he cannot comment on “any ongoing operation," but he defends the collection of military and other intelligence overseas.