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obamacare

Exam room.
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This Wednesday marks the start of the open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare.

This fifth enrollment season is the first one under President Trump, and it’s marked by what critics call his efforts to undermine the ACA.

Marianne Udow-Phillips from the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation joined Stateside to walk us through what to expect.

Listen above for the full conversation, or read highlights below.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Attorney General will not be joining some of his fellow state attorneys general in challenging President Trump’s decision to end Obamacare subsidies.

The White House plans to halt payments to insurers under the Obama-era health care law.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Access to health care for hundreds of thousands of Michiganders may be at risk as a federal funding deadline looms.

More than 40 community health centers provide care for 680,000 Michiganders. But federal funding for them expires this week. 

By one estimate, 100,000 Michiganders could lose their health care access almost immediately.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Senate takes up a bill to replace the Affordable Care Act this week.    

Under the bill, states would assume greater control over health care, and Obamacare coverage mandates could be waived for people with pre-existing conditions.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, still thinks there's a path forward for a last-ditch effort to end Obamacare, even after his friend, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said he opposes the bill.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan hospitals are coming out against the Republicans’ latest plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

The new bill, sponsored by U.S. Senators Bill Cassidy and Lindsey Graham, would replace Obamacare with a system that gives states more control.

money
Pictures of Money / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Republicans have failed, so far, to pass a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), much to the visible frustration of President Trump.

There’s now a third attempt, the Graham-Cassidy bill, gathering steam in the Senate for a possible vote next week.

At the same time, the White House is being accused of trying to strangle the ACA by slashing funding for navigators, the groups who help people get health insurance.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio/

Affordable Care Act health insurance rates may jump in Michigan next year, depending on a decision by the Trump administration.

The Trump administration has threatened to end Cost Sharing Reduction payments.  The federal government offers those subsidies to offset the cost of insurance policies that cover low income residents.  

State insurance officials say Michiganders buying health insurance through the marketplace will see rates rise between 16% and 59% next year.

sign that says "please be a leader in the fight for single payer"
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan opponents of repealing the Affordable Care Act say now that the latest effort to repeal it has failed, it’s time to look at how to fix Obamacare's problems. 

Rising costs was a complaint raised by several people attending a forum on health care in Saginaw on Wednesday. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder is concerned about what a Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act will mean for tens of thousands of Michiganders on Medicaid.

Today, U.S. Senate Republicans issued a revised version of their health care bill. The changes include a penalty for people who let their insurance lapse. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Fewer insurance companies will be offering health care plans in Michigan through the Affordable Care Act marketplace this fall.

Since Obamacare began, Michigan insurance regulators have vetted the companies willing to offer health care plans in the state.  This year, they’ll have fewer companies to vet. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State Republicans and Democrats are sparring over a proposal to keep some key Affordable Care Act provisions in place in Michigan, even if Congress succeeds in repealing Obamacare.

Unless you spent yesterday in a salt mine, you know that the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill radically altering the Affordable Care Act.

If you don’t know exactly what’s in this bill, or how it would affect you, you are not alone. Neither did virtually any of the members of congress, all of them Republicans, who voted for this bill, which they are calling the American Health Care Act.

Doctor's office
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Relieved Republicans have pushed their prized health care bill through the House. The mostly party-line 217-213 vote advances a bill that addresses their longtime pledge to erase the 2010 Obama health care law.

“Today, I voted to keep the promise I made to the voters of my district to rescue Americans from the collapsing health care law that has raised premiums and deductibles and replace it with a better health care system,” says Rep. John Moolenaar, R-Midland.

A sign protesting the House bill that seeks to repeal the Affordable Care Act.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Protestors gathered outside U.S. Rep. David Trott's (R-11th district) office in southeast Michigan today.

The group has a simple demand: that Trott  vote against a Republican bill that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Although Trott was not at his office during the protest, a spokesman allowed protestors to air their grievances, two at a time.  

The American Healthcare Act has a provision that lowers protections for people with preexisting conditions.

The center strikes back. We are seeing a resurgence in the power of moderate Republicans in D.C. and Lansing.

pixanay

The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, remains the law of the land for now.

As you almost certainly know, there’s a Republican-backed bill before Congress that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, known to most people as Obamacare.

Republicans control both houses of Congress, and if they stay united on this, the bill should become law, perhaps within weeks.

If that happens, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office estimates that within nine years, the number of people without health insurance in this nation would grow by 24 million.

Capitol Hill
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Last week, House Republicans submitted their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

The bill, which has been under intense committee debate, has drawn criticism from Democrats, some Republicans, health care organizations, doctors, and others. But it is largely supported by House Republicans and the White House.

Some of the bill’s provisions would be enacted as soon as it is put into law, including the elimination of individual and employer mandates. Others would be delayed until 2020, such as limiting the Medicaid expansion and a repeal of subsidies for out-of-pocket expenses.

What’s a Republican governor to do when his own political party is the problem?

We’re hearing a lot about the divide among Republicans in D.C. over the “repeal and replacement” of Obamacare.

President Donald Trump and the House Republican leadership have a plan. But, conservatives don’t like it. Democrats don’t like it. Interest groups like the AARP are already piling on, and let’s add to the list: Republican governors like Ohio Governor John Kasich and Michigan’s own Rick Snyder.

Hospital bed
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

Governor Rick Snyder is one of the Republicans who is not on board with the GOP plan in Congress to overhaul the Affordable Care Act.

Michigan is one of the states that expanded its Medicaid program under the ACA.

Snyder is particularly concerned about how the congressional plan would affect Medicaid, especially the Healthy Michigan program that enrolled more than 650,000 people who wouldn’t have coverage otherwise.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

I have an idea. This should especially appeal to everyone who either didn’t like President Obama, or thought there were flaws in his signature achievement, the Affordable Care Act. Let’s get even by taking health care away from 650,000 Michiganders with lower incomes.

Now, granted, this will have repercussions.

U.S. Rep. John Moolenaar, R-Midland, meets with people in Stanton, Michigan
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

As Congress pushes forward with repealing the Affordable Care Act, Michiganders are giving conflicting advice to members of the state delegation.

This week, as the nation prepared to inaugurate a new president, Republican lawmakers too time to meet with people in town hall sessions. 

Republican John Moolenaar met with constituents in Stanton this week, as part of listening tour of his mid-Michigan congressional district.