photography

Stateside
1:07 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Why this Detroit-area man refuses to say nice things about his city

One of the photos archived on Dickson's blog. This graffiti, in Dickson's word, "does a pretty solid job depicting the city’s main roads."
Credit James David Dickson / Down I-94: a blog about Detroit

"Say Nice Things About Detroit."

That cheery slogan was first launched in the '70s by Emily Gail. She had a shop in downtown Detroit when it was the murder capital of the country, and she grabbed a lot of attention with that slogan.

Now it’s been revived, as Detroit has been under the spotlight of bankruptcy and the "Grand Bargain."

James David Dickson, a commentary editor at the Detroit News, believes the chirpy slogan isn't helping anyone in Detroit or the city itself. His opinion piece "Why I refused to say nice things about Detroit" was on the Detroit News blog.

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Arts & Culture
10:32 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Detroit's artists on love, heartbreak, and sext messages

Childhood valentines on display.
Melanie Kruvelis Michigan Radio

By now you've hopefully recovered from your Valentine's weekend.

Maybe you spent it with a hot date, or just curled up in pajamas binge-watching "House of Cards."

In Detroit, you could have checked out an art show about love and heartbreak. It's made up entirely of people's breakup emails, sext messages, tween diary entries, and love letters.

And if that sounds cringe-worthy, you're right.

Anonymous submissions, from prison letters to breakup emails 

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Arts & Culture
6:12 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Why images of strangers make us feel less alone

A photo from Humans of Ann Arbor's Facebook page. It has 4,380 likes.
Susan K. Campbell

Full audio's above, if you really want to feel the awkwardness, and awesomeness, of asking strangers if you can take their picture.

If you’re walking around Ann Arbor or Detroit these days, you should know:  a total stranger may come up and ask to take your picture.

They’ll snap a few shots. Maybe ask how your day is going.

Then they’ll post it all on Facebook. And hundreds, possibly even thousands of people will see it.

That’s because two photographers – one in each city – are building a growing fan base around these daily street photos.

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Arts & Culture
1:48 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Check out these award-winning Instagram pictures from Detroit's Brush Park

A photo from Diane Weiss' Instagram account, Brushpark_MyHood.
Instagram

A Detroit Free Press photo editor won a $3,000 grant for her latest project — capturing her community through her iPhone lens.

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Politics & Culture
4:57 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Stateside for Monday, November 4th, 2013

Voters in Detroit go to the polls tomorrow, and no matter who gets elected to be that city's next Mayor, crime will be one of the problems they'll have to tackle. On today's show, we looked past the city's financial struggles to curbing the violence in Detroit.

 And, we found out about a "flipped school" - one of the first in the nation. Students watch lectures at night and do homework during the day in class.  And, a Grand Rapids park millage will take park funding out of the city's general fund. We spoke with one of the supports of the millage to find out why voters should consider it. Also, a Canadian photographer found beauty in the ruins of Detroit. He joined us to talk about his exhibit. 

First on the show, one of the most emotionally charged issues in Michigan in 2013 has been wolves.

After teetering on the brink of extinction, the gray wolf population has rebounded so much so that earlier this year, Governor Rick Snyder signed a law that allows a first-ever state wolf hunt in the Upper Peninsula.

That historic hunt begins November 15.

Forty-three wolves can be shot in three UP zones where officials say they have the most problems.

During the legislative debate on the wolf hunt, lawmakers from the UP spoke with passion about the "fear" their constituents had of the wolves, worrying for the safety of livestock, pets, even small children.

Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody spoke with the point man on wolves for the DNR. Adam Bump told Steve that wolves had become very accustomed to life in Ironwood.

"So you have wolves showing up in backyards, wolves showing up on porches, wolves staring at people through their sliding glass doors, while they're pounding on it, exhibiting no fear."

But an MLive investigation into the historic wolf hunt raises some serious questions about the debate, about claims made by opponents, and about the DNR's Bump.

John Barnes is reporting on this for MLive in a series called "Crying Wolf," and he joined us today.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Canadian photographer finds art in Detroit's decaying buildings

A photo from Jarmin's Detroit exhibit.
Philip Jarmin Facebook

Anyone who has spent time driving around the city of Detroit has seen ruined buildings. They can be found just about everywhere within the city limits.

Among those decaying buildings can be found some of the finest examples of early 20th century architecture, the kinds of buildings that remind us that Detroit was once known as the “Paris of the Midwest.”

Canadian photographer Philip Jarmain first discovered these disintegrating beauties while he was a student at the University of Windsor. And ever since 2010, Philip Jarmain has been documenting these vanishing early 20th century buildings.

Twenty of his fine art prints were recently on exhibit at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco, with interest in these large format architectural photographs certainly fueled by the headlines surrounding Detroit’s bankruptcy filing.

The exhibit was called American Beauty: The Opulent Pre-Depression Architecture of Detroit.

Philip Jarmain joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:28 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Photography exhibit shows connections between Detroit and the ancient city of Petra

Petra was established in 312 BC.
Chris Yunker Flickr

An interview with photographer Susan Webb.

To study archeology means to study the activity of humans in the past.

What can we learn from studying the buildings, the artifacts, the cultural landscapes of past civilizations? And how far back in the past do you go? Many centuries ago? Or just a few decades?

Based on a special exhibition that’s in its final few days at the Kelsey Museum of Archeology, perhaps the answer is both.

Photographer Susan Webb’s exhibit “Red Rock and Rust Belt” shows the connections between two cities that are separated by thousands of miles and many centuries: the ancient site of Petra established around 312 B.C. in what is now Jordan -- and Detroit, especially the Detroit of the industrial 20th century.

What can we learn by studying these two cities in side-by-side photographs?

Susan Webb, who has basically had a camera in her hand since her Dad gave her a Kodak Brownie when she was just eight, joined us today to talk about her exhibit.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:06 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

A state House panel in Lansing has kicked off a series of hearings on Common Core. You may have been hearing about the Common Core lately. They're a set of nationwide school standards put together by the National Governors' Association and they're being debated around the nation. We spoke with Michigan School Board President John Austin, a supporter of Common Core, and state Representive Tom McMillin (R-Rochester Hills), an opponent of the standards.

And, Michigan is seeing a lot of growth in its craft beer industry. We took a look at what’s behind this growth and what some Michigan brewers are doing to protect our waters.

Also, photographer Susan Webb joined us today to talk about her exhibit in the Kelsey Museum of Archeology, which links 20th century Detroit to the ancient city of Petra.

First on the show, the latest word on new car sales in Europe is not anything that's bringing cheer at GM, Ford and Chrysler headquarters.

New car sales in Europe have just suffered their worst June in seventeen years, and the six-month number is the worst in 20 years.

Let's look at what's behind this protracted free fall in European car sales.

Reporter Russell Padmore from the BBC in London joined us today.

And, what do these European car sales numbers mean to folks at the Ren Cen in Detroit, Glass House in Dearborn, or the Tech Center in Auburn Hills? In other words, how are the poor sales in Europe affecting GM, Ford and Chrysler?

For that we turn to auto analyst Michele Krebs who’s with Edmunds.com.

Environment & Science
11:10 am
Thu May 9, 2013

You have to see this stunning video of Michigan's Northern Lights

From Shawn Malone's time-lapse video.
Shawn Malone Vimeo screen grab

The wonders of our night sky often escape us.

The rainbows of the fleeting Northern Lights or the bright streak of a comet frequently slip behind cloud cover or crowded city skylines, leaving stargazers unrewarded.

But Shawn Malone, of Lake Superior Photo, was luckier than most.

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Arts & Culture
11:44 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Grief, healing and one photographer's final family portraits

Sara Joy, and her infant son Joel. Joel lived for just five days.
Monni Must naturallymonni.com

Hear the full story above.

Parents love pictures of their baby. That’s why we don’t complain, at least not to their faces, when they take over Facebook and fill up our email.

But when your baby’s life is cut short, those photographs can take on a whole new significance.

 This is the story of two moms, and how these final family portraits are helping them heal after the loss of a child.

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Arts & Culture
4:45 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Stateside: Artist Alec Soth on his Michigan travels

Alec Soth's photography
http://www.cranbrookart.edu/museum/

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Alec Soth's exhibition, "From Here to There: Alec Soth's America," is on display at the Cranbrook Art Museum through March 30.

Soth spoke today with Cyndy about his time in Michigan and the various people he encountered.

Soth was unfamiliar with Michigan at the start of his trip.

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Arts & Culture
4:29 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Stateside: Michigan's shores documented in the Fresh Coast Project

Ed Wargin's Fresh Coast Project captures the Great Lakes in all their glowing beauty
Ed Wargin

Photographer Ed Wargin is enchanted by the Great Lakes; he endeavors to document all 10,000 miles of their shores with his Fresh Coast Project.

The project's aim is to celebrate the beauty of the Great Lakes through the ephemeral medium of film photography.

"I've realized we often look at the Great Lakes in parts and pieces. The goal of the project is to try to look at the Great Lakes as one story," said Wargin.

Wargin hopes his shots of gleaming sunsets will  inform people of the state's abundant resources and thereby promote their preservation.

Hear Wargin further discuss his Fresh Coast Project on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Arts & Culture
1:04 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Michigan Radio Picture Project: ArtPrize and Detroit Design Festival

Hip Hop duo Passalacqua in front of the Detroit Institute of the Arts checking out part of the 4 mile long hopscotch course the was created during the Detroit Design Festival.
Doug Coombe Michigan Radio Picture Project

Michigan Radio’s Picture Project is an experimental blog and forum for photographs that address Michigan people, places, events, and issues.

See the site for new features on Grand Rapids ArtPrize 2012 and Detroit Design Festival 2012.

Now in its fourth year, ArtPrize is an open art competition sprawling across downtown Grand Rapids--in galleries, on the street, and all over the city.

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Arts/Culture
11:02 am
Mon October 10, 2011

DIA photo exhibit puts Detroit in spotlight

Southeast from Roof, Michigan Central, Scott Hocking, 2008 (printed in 2009), pigment print. © Scott Hocking, 2011. Detroit Institute of Arts

A new exhibit at the Detroit Institute of Arts looks at life in the Motor City over the past decade. 

The exhibit - Detroit Revealed - includes videos and photographs of city residents and community gardens. It also includes images of the city’s decline: abandoned buildings and empty, overgrown lots - what some call “ruin porn."

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What's Working
7:05 am
Mon April 18, 2011

Children focus in on nature

Pictured Rocks on Lake Superior
user Rhonda Noren Flickr

With the spread and advancement of home technology such as televisions, computers, cell phones, and video games, American children are spending less and less time outdoors. A baseball glove has been traded in for a remote control, and parents have gone from fretting over grass-stained jeans to fretting over their child’s apparent reclusiveness. Most kids today are more comfortable walking a parent through setting up Facebook account than they are walking through a forest. But the Udall Foundation, based in Arizona, is trying to reacquaint kids with the joys of exploring the natural world with their Parks in Focus program.

Parks in Focus is all about bridging the gap between technology and nature. Children, mostly middle school aged, are put in touch with Parks in Focus through the Boys and Girls Clubs of America and Big Brothers Big Sisters. After providing each child with a digital camera to document their explorations, Parks in Focus program leaders take the children on camping and hiking trips in some of America’s most scenic parks. While trips originally went only to the Grand Canyon, Parks in Focus has expanded to several other states, including Michigan.

Bret Muter is the Michigan Program Coordinator for Parks in Focus. He says digital cameras act as security blankets for the kids, allowing them to have a familiar piece of technology in an unfamiliar world of mountains, streams, and creepy crawlies.

“If kids aren’t comfortable with nature, they’re typically comfortable with technology such as a camera, even if they don’t own one. So cameras serve as that safety net for exploring the environment, which may otherwise be unfamiliar or even scary to some kids.”

On top of just making the children more comfortable with the initial shock of being out in the middle of the woods, Muter says the cameras allow the kids to interact with their surroundings more than they normally would.

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