Politics & Government

Stories about politics and government actions

User: West Midlands Police / Wikimedia Commons

Kalamazoo Public Safety Chief Jeff Hadley says he’d like all of his officers to wear body cameras by 2016.

Hadley has some concerns about citizens’ privacy and the costs, but he thinks the cameras will be worth it.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint city council is expected to fill two vacant seats on Monday.

The vacancies were created when two Flint city council members were elected to other offices in November. Former councilman Sheldon Neeley was elected to the state House of representatives. Former councilman Bryant Nolden is taking a seat on the Genesee County Board of Commissioners. 

Universty of Michigan QB Devin Gardner sacked by Michigan State defensive end Shilique Calhoun during the 2013 MSU-UM football game.
User: Michigan State Spartans / facebook

This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rina Miller discuss Governor Rick Snyder’s air gun legislation veto, a new criminal justice commission, and legislation that forbids Michigan public university athletes from unionizing.


Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Governor Rick Snyder says Republican lawmakers should not be too quick to adopt tax cuts this year.

“I think people should work under that assumption, that it could be very difficult. And, first, let’s make sure we’re being fiscally responsible.”

Nevertheless, some incoming GOP lawmakers say they’d like to cut the state income tax.

Rick Pluta / Michigan Public Radio Network

Governor Rick Snyder has begun his second term as Michigan’s 48th governor. He took the oath of office in a ceremony on the steps of the state Capitol in the freezing cold.

A few hundred people bundled up to brave the cold and witness the start of Governor Snyder’s second term. The term-limited governor cannot run again, but says it would be a mistake to think of him as a lame duck.  He said people who might think that don’t know him.

Some graffiti found on a Midtown Detroit youth center this week evokes recent incidents of violence and tension between police and civilians--and it's being condemned as inflammatory by both police and community groups.

Rick Snyder / michigan.gov

Governor Rick Snyder will be sworn in tomorrow for his second and final term. The inauguration ceremony will take place at the state Capitol.

Governor Snyder says he wants to start his second term focusing on workforce development – with an emphasis on trade skills.

Michigan Legislature
Matthileo / Flickr

This Week in Politics, Emily Fox and Jack Lessenberry discuss how 2015 is shaping up for Michigan. The Legislature is new, but many of the state’s problems are the same.


Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s emergency manager plans to start prepping for the end of his tenure.

Flint has been under an emergency manager since 2011. 

Current emergency manager Darnell Earley’s appointment ends in April.    He’s working now to begin the transition back to local control.

Tricycle Collective / via Facebook

People living in homes owned by the Detroit Land Bank Authority should get a chance to buy them back.

That’s the message from the Tricycle Collective, a group that’s been helping Detroit families facing tax foreclosure.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Wednesday is a crucial deadline for city of Detroit retirees.

It’s the last day to file applications for help from a state-backed income stabilization fund.

That fund is meant to help pensioners pushed into or near poverty by cuts made during the city’s restructuring in bankruptcy.

user Samahiaka18 / wikimedia commons

When former Supreme Court Justice Maura Corrigan took the job as head of Michigan's Department of Human Services in 2011, she made it clear she would only serve for four years. Her time is up and she's stepping down Jan. 1. 

DHS is responsible for serving some of Michigan’s most vulnerable citizens. The agency is in charge of foster care, food assistance for Michigan’s hungry, welfare benefits, and child care licensing, among other things.

Director Corrigan has been widely credited for making strides on improving the child welfare system during her tenure. That system is still under federal court oversight assigned in 2008, but the state has asked a judge to re-examine that status. 

Wikimedia

Gov. Rick Snyder has vetoed legislation that would have relaxed restrictions on guns that use air-power to shoot pellets, BBs, paintballs, and other projectiles.

The legislation was supported by the NRA and gun rights groups, but opposed by many local government officials who would have lost a lot of authority to regulate air guns within their borders.

The NRA says Michigan is one of only four states that classify air guns as firearms.

Gov. Snyder says he vetoed the bills because they were part of an incomplete package of legislation. He says they would have changed the definition of what a firearm is in some state laws, but leave them untouched in others.

dave / morgueFile

Gov. Rick Snyder will soon consider a bill that could make public records cheaper and easier to obtain.

Proponents have long claimed some agencies that are subject to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) charge exorbitant fees to process requests for public records. They claim the goal is to discourage people from trying to obtain those documents.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Detroit's Democratic mayor will serve as master of ceremonies for the inauguration of Republican Gov. Rick Snyder and Lt. Gov. Brian Calley in Lansing.

  Mayor Mike Duggan joins Snyder and Calley Jan. 1 at the Capitol. Snyder said in a news release that Duggan "has been a great partner in the effort to reinvent" the state and city.

DETROIT (AP) - After years of declining population, Michigan's leading population expert says the industrial state finally seems to be on track toward growth again.

  The U.S. Census reported this month that Michigan's population rose a razor-thin 0.1 percent to 9.91 million in 2014, the third straight increase.

Well, it’s Christmas Eve, the official start of a holiday that long ago became as much a secular as a religious one. Tonight and tomorrow, we mark an occasion in which Americans of nearly all faiths  celebrate our strenuous attempts to please the gods of retail sales.

Early indications are that we’ve done fairly well.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is reviewing hundreds of bills approved by the Legislature in the waning days of the lame-duck session.

Lawmakers sent the governor 224 bills since the November election.

user memories_by_mike / Flickr

This week, Jack Lessenberry and Emily Fox discuss some of 2014's top political stories. Funding for road repairs, Detroit's bankruptcy case and gay marriage all made headlines in Michigan this year.


Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Voters will decide in May whether to raise taxes for roads and education.

Keith Allard chairs the Grand Rapids Taxpayer Association, a group formed to oppose a city income tax extension in Grand Rapids. It passed last May.

Now he’s opposing a proposed increase in the Michigan sales tax that residents will vote on in May.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Natasha Henderson admits there are challenges ahead.

Henderson was introduced today as Flint’s incoming city administrator. Starting in February, she’ll take over running the day-to-day operations of a city still struggling to shake off a multi-million dollar budget deficit and ongoing crime problems. 

Today on Stateside:

  • Will a market-based approach prevent an Enbridge Energy spill in the Great Lakes?
  • Clayton Eshleman spent decades translating the works of  renowned Peruvian poet Cesar Vallejo.
  • It's been a year since that massive ice storm knocked out power to much of Lansing. What’s changed?
  • We hear about a funk and soul band from Ann Arbor called the Third Coast Kings.
U.S. Govt Printing Office

ALBEE TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) - Former three-term Democratic Michigan U.S. Rep. Don Albosta has died. He was 89.

C.M. Humpula Funeral Home says Albosta died Thursday. 

The Saginaw-born Albosta served in the U.S. Navy in World War II and was a farmer. He was elected to the Saginaw County Commission and Michigan House before serving in Congress in 1979-1984.

Albosta lost his re-election bid to Republican Bill Schuette in 1984.

Today on Stateside:

  • A look back at the year for the auto industry
  • An interview with author Kathleen Flinn about her latest book, Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good (archive segment)
  • How Detroit’s sound influenced an entire generation (archive segment)
Pension protest in Detroit.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Detroit's two pension funds will get $195 million from the state on Feb. 9.

A three-member board overseeing Michigan's contribution to Detroit's bankruptcy case approved the payment Monday. The money is intended to strengthen the pension funds and prevent cuts from going deeper than 4.5 percent for retirees. It also prevents any sale of city-owned art.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Environmentalists raised their voices in song on Friday to express their disappointment in the Michigan Legislature this year.

The group that gathered to sing carols at the foot of the holiday tree outside the state Capitol on Friday were not the best singers. But with songs like “Smoggy the Coalman," the quality of their singing was obviously not the point. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan Republican Party Chairman Bobby Schostak is not seeking another two-year term, which means someone else, will lead the party through the 2016 election cycle.

user Tqycolumbia / Wikimedia Commons

This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rina Miller discuss a long-awaited plan to fix Michigan’s roads, job cuts to one of the state’s largest agencies, and some holiday cheer from Rep. John Dingell.

Roads deal

After weeks of hemming and hawing over how to fix the state’s roads, Michigan lawmakers have OK'd plans for a sales tax hike.

Governor Rick Snyder ended the lame duck session closer to his goal of more money for roads. But, we’re not ready to put this one in the ‘win’ column for the governor. Not yet, at least.

 That’s because the state won’t see a dime of this money unless voters approve the package in May.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - A proposed tax hike aimed at improving Michigan's transportation infrastructure and schools is heading to voters.

  The Michigan Legislature has put a sales tax increase on the May statewide ballot as part of a road funding plan.

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