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Politics & Government

Stories about politics and government actions

Ken Sikkema expects the Michigan House of Representatives in Lansing to be even more conservative in 2017.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The election is over and now it’s time to plan for the next session.  That was the feeling as Republicans and Democrats chose party leaders two days after the election.

The House Republicans chose Tom Leonard for House Speaker.

Speaker-elect Leonard says he has three main issues he hopes to address next year. Mental health reform, improving skilled trades, and addressing long-term debt and liabilities. Leonard says he is ready to corral the 63-member majority.

With a young Republican, a mom from the LGBTQ community, and political strategists, we continue to reflect on the results of Tuesday's presidential election.

Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs (left) and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems
Photos courtesy of T.J. Bucholz and Matt Marsden

America needs some healing.

The long, hard, bitter campaign left deep divisions and many are wondering what it will take to bring us together as Americans -- to give us a sense of being on the same team.

Is that even possible in 2016?

To make sense of it all, Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems joined Stateside to break it all down.

Trump rally in Newtown, Pennsylvania.
user Michael Candelori / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

“The Rust Belt revenge.”

That’s how Detroit News Business columnist Daniel Howes views the Election Day surprise that put Donald Trump in the White House and secured both Houses of Congress for the Republican Party.

In Howes’ view, the Rust Belt vote came together as a many-throated cry of “Listen to us!”

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

As president of the College Republicans at the University of Michigan, Enrique Zalamea worked hard to get out the vote for Donald Trump.

He said Trump represents the American, Christian and Republican values he believes in.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Medical marijuana growers in Lansing may soon have to register with city, if they use an “excessive” amount of electricity.

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero is proposing an ordinance to require people who continuously use 5000 kilowatts of electricity to register with the city.   

“We have seen a number of cases where the growing equipment used to cultivate medical marijuana overloads the electrical circuits in the home,” says Bernero. “This, of course, creates a fire hazard.”

President-elect Donald Trump.
user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

President-elect Donald Trump won Michigan Tuesday by the narrowest margin in the state’s history.

Pollsters say rural and blue collar voters put Trump over the top by the narrowest of majorities – just over a quarter of a percentage point -- .27 percent. You’d have to go back to the 1940 election – Wendell Wilkie versus President Franklin Roosevelt – to find a margin nearly as close.

flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Hundreds of people gathered on U of M's Ann Arbor campus yesterday to protest Donald Trump's election. The president-elect used sexist and racially charged speech for the majority of his campaign.

David Schafer is a senior at U of M.

He says the key for students is to stay involved after the vigil.

“I think it's ensuring that our work does not start and stop tonight or even tomorrow or next week,” he said. “I think it's continuing to challenge people who might be saying problematic things.

House Minority Leader Tim Greimel.
WKAR-TV

Republicans have hung onto their majority in the state House. Meanwhile Democrats are planning a change of leadership for next year.

President-elect Donald Trump’s surprise victory trickled down to the House Republicans. The House kept its Republican majority by the same numbers and puts them in a more relaxed position going into the Lame Duck session.

But the Democrats are getting a bit of a shake-up. House Minority Leader Tim Greimel announced he is not running to lead his caucus for the 2017-2018 session. This leaves a leadership hole in the minority party. 

Many Americans were stunned and blindsided by Donald Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton. Today, we look at how the polls got it so wrong. And, Michiganders react to the results of the 2016 election. 

flicker user/stevebustin

In Michigan, Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton by less than three-tenths of one percent of the total votes. With polls and pundits across the state and the nation predicting a win for Clinton, people of all political stripes were stunned by the election's result.

Stateside went out onto the streets and handed the microphone over to people so they could share their thoughts on the day after this historic election. There were feelings of joy, of fear, of sadness, of relief, of uncertainty. You can hear them above. 

FLICKR USER 401(K) 2012 / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Over the last few weeks, Michigan all of a sudden became a battleground state.

Both candidates and their surrogates barnstormed across Michigan to rally supporters and get out the vote.

McDaniel told us Republican voter turnout was more or less in line with what the party expected.
www.migop.org

 


Michigan has voted a Republican into the White House for the first time since 1988.

Michigan Republican Party Chairman Ronna Romney McDaniel told us the results were “absolutely” beyond what the party hoped for.

Aerial shot of Detroit
flickr user Barbara Eckstein / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

One of the big decisions before Detroit voters Tuesday was choosing between a pair of competing "community benefits" proposals.

Both were aimed at making sure private developers seeking tax breaks for projects in Detroit would provide certain benefits to the community around the development: Things like jobs, affordable housing and pollution controls.

 


Donald Trump’s victory is seen as one of the watershed moments in American political history.

Michigan voters certainly played a role in this upset.

It’s Just Politics team Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta sat down with us today to dive into what happened in our state.

Polling station sign
user jaina / Creative Commons


Many Americans were stunned and blindsided by Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton.

That’s largely because months and months of polls pointed to a defeat of our new president-elect.

Zach Gorchow, editor of Gongwer News Service, joined us today to talk about those polls.

“Polling has a lot of problems. It’s just not able to model the electorate successfully, and that seems to be especially true in Michigan,” Gorchow said. “It just flat out failed to model the African-American turnout correctly, it failed to model the rural turnout correctly."

Marijuana advocates collected more than 300,000 signatures earlier this year, only to have them rejected for failing to meet a state rule on collecting signatures.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan marijuana advocates say legalization may be an “easier sell” after ballot victories in California and other states on Tuesday.

MI-Legalize executive director Jeff Hank is feeling good these days.

“The next election’s already started for us,” Hank says with a laugh.

Voters in Midland cast ballots for Republicans, Democrats and Libertarians on Tuesday.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Libertarian Party didn’t win many races Tuesday, but the party received more votes than it has in the past.

Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson picked up nearly 170,000 votes in Michigan. Many local candidates did very well too. Some getting more than 5% of the votes cast in their races.

“These are not wins,” says Bill Gelineau, Michigan’s Libertarian Party chairman. “This doesn’t mean that we’re sitting in the Legislature. But it does mean that we’re becoming a bigger and bigger part of the conversation.”

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

America has a new president-elect this morning, but the jury is still out when it comes to which candidate will carry Michigan.

On this Week in Michigan Politics Doug Tribou and Jack Lessenberry talk about how Donald Trump could become the first Republican to carry the state since 1988. They also discuss Republican victories in the 1st and 7th Congressional Districts, and the Republican's sustained control of  the state House and Supreme Court.


A map outlining the proposed transit master plan for Metro Detroit.
Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan

A millage proposal to fund transit improvements has failed in Metro Detroit.

It would have allowed the Southeast Michigan Regional Transit Authority to implement an ambitious transit master plan, upgrading the historically dismal and fragmented transit systems in Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, and Washtenaw counties.

The millage would have raised about $3 billion over 20 years to build bus rapid transit systems, bolster and better connect existing bus lines, provide transit connections to Detroit Metro Airport, and other services.

For the first time since 1988, Michigan appears to have helped elect a Republican president. The state’s 16 electoral votes will go to Republican nominee Donald Trump if the narrow victory holds.

Scott Hagerstrom is Trump’s Michigan campaign chairman. He says the results show Trump’s unconventional campaign strategy worked.

“He went into Detroit. He went into Flint – against what everyone said, but he did because he is, that’s what he’s going to do for our country,” he said. “He’s going to be a fighter for the American people.”

gop.gov / gop.gov

After 24 years, Macomb County has a new public works commissioner: retiring Republican Congresswoman Candice Miller.

The race for that typically low-profile, decidedly un-glamorous job got nasty--and expensive—this year.

Democrat Anthony Marrocco has been Macomb’s public works commissioner for 24 years.

The job description is all about managing sewers and storm drains. But the commissioner also controls important construction permits, and some very large county contracts.

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Voters in Kent County approved two separate measures to support a zoo, museum and improved services for an emergency dispatch.

A millage increase will help pay to repair and improve exhibits at the Grand Rapids Public Museum. It’ll also help pay to care for animals at John Ball Zoo. Backers estimate it’ll raise a little over $9 million a year. WOOD-TV reports the additional .44 mills will cost the owner of a $170,000 home $37.40 more per year through 2025.

Michigan Republicans watch returns Tuesday night.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Tuesday night’s victories came after a contentious year for Michigan’s Republican Party.

Party leaders were sharply divided for months over Donald Trump as their presidential nominee and the direction of the party.

Now State Republican Party Chairman Ronna Romney McDaniel admits this has been a difficult year, her first as state party chair.

Michigan's Hall of Justice.
Eridony / flickr

The two races for Michigan Supreme Court have gone to the incumbents.

Michigan Supreme Court Justices Joan Larsen and David Viviano held onto their seats on Michigan’s highest court.

Larsen defeated Wayne County Judge Deborah Thomas and lawyer Kerry Morgan. Gov. Rick Snyder appointed Larsen to the court in 2015 to replace a justice who resigned. She's now been elected to serve the two years remaining on that term.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Voters in Flint and Lansing approved renewals of their public safety millages.

Flint police chief Tim Johnson says renewing the millage will help expand the number of officers on Flint’s streets.

“For the last probably four or five months, I’ve really been stretching the Flint police officers across the board and I don’t want them to hit no burnout stage,” says Johnson, “but I can see that coming if we don’t get some more officers in there.”

Muralist at work at NPR
NPR - Facebook

NPR has a muralist painting state-by-state results in the middle of its newsroom as results come in.

You can watch below.

The candidate with 270 electoral votes or more wins the presidency.

Today, as results come in across the country, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. The NPR Politics team, along with Member station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

“As far as we're concerned here in Michigan, there's no suggestion or allegation that there were any hacks or any attempts to that," Woodhams said.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Here are election results from the major races we are following. 

Sign directing voters to polling place
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 cropped

Long delays at some voting places in Washtenaw and Wayne counties have caused some voters to leave before casting their ballots, according to a non-partisan election protection coalition in Michigan that is working in partnership with the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. 

"There've been issues on the campus at the University of Michigan where students are waiting for two and three hours to vote. But all of the poll booths are set up and empty," said Melanie McElroy, director of the Michigan coalition. "They're merely waiting to be checked in electronically."

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