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Politics & Government

Stories about politics and government actions

Today, as results come in across the country, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. The NPR Politics team, along with Member station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

“As far as we're concerned here in Michigan, there's no suggestion or allegation that there were any hacks or any attempts to that," Woodhams said.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Here are election results from the major races we are following. 

Sign directing voters to polling place
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 cropped

Long delays at some voting places in Washtenaw and Wayne counties have caused some voters to leave before casting their ballots, according to a non-partisan election protection coalition in Michigan that is working in partnership with the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. 

"There've been issues on the campus at the University of Michigan where students are waiting for two and three hours to vote. But all of the poll booths are set up and empty," said Melanie McElroy, director of the Michigan coalition. "They're merely waiting to be checked in electronically."

 

Today, we learn why our election process is so dang long. And, in our latest edition of Songs from Studio East, we meet a band that blends ska, punk and Latin rhythms. 

It's Election Day, but that doesn't mean the fun stops here. Grossmann told us many politicians are looking four years ahead, and, "in some ways, [the 2020 presidential campaign] has already started."
Ryan Grimes / Michigan Radio

 

Election Day marks the finish line of a grueling, fractious and long campaign.

It started with Ted Cruz announcing his candidacy in March 2015.

Twenty months later, many Americans are expressing their exhaustion with the process.

Many people are looking wistfully to other countries like Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and France, which elect their leaders in a few weeks and then move on.

Michigan State University associate professor of political science Matt Grossmann sat down with us today to talk about how the process for electing our president became so protracted.

Who needs elections when you have this monkey?
Screen grab from Agence France-Presse / https://www.yahoo.com/news/china-monkey-king-picks-trump-next-us-president-002407936.html

We're all waiting for the election results to come in tonight, but for some the election has already been called.

We've got reports from four animals that have predicted the outcome.

First, there's a psychic, Scottish goat named Boots. He has a pretty good track record considering he correctly predicted the United Kingdom would leave the European Union, the Scottish Sun reports

Courtesy Michigan Radio

Unless you've been living under a rock, you know that today is Election Day. Voters today will decide on a President, members of Congress, state legislators and various ballot proposals.

With our votes having so much weight, some Michigan residents posted about the day on social media.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The presidential candidates and their surrogates swung through Michigan on the final day before the polls opened.

President Obama was in Michigan as part of a tour of battleground states. The president tried to drum up support for Hillary Clinton and the rest of the Democratic ticket during a rally in Ann Arbor.

Obama spoke to a crowd of about nine thousand people at the University of Michigan. He told first-time voters in the audience that this year has been a strange one in politics. The president said he’s been frustrated by a lot of the news coverage of the campaign.

Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Grand Valley State University the day before Election Day.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

The election is tomorrow, but if you thought the major party candidates were going to take a break, you would be wrong. Michigan has secured its position as a battleground state.

Both major party presidential candidates are stopping in West Michigan in the hours before the polls open.

Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talked jobs and the economy during a rally at Grand Valley State University. But she also focused on bringing the country together after a very divisive election.

Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in 2008.
Marc Nozell / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

President Obama was in Michigan today as part of a tour of battleground states. The president is trying to drum up support for Hillary Clinton and the rest of the Democratic ticket on the day before Election Day.

Obama spoke to a crowd of about 9,000 people at the University of Michigan. He told first-time voters in the audience that this year has been a strange one in politics. The president said he’s been frustrated by a lot of the news coverage of the campaign.

Today, we discuss why the most important campaigners are in Michigan on the day before the presidential election. And, we hear why it's difficult for one economist to be optimistic about our economic future, no matter who wins.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

One of my favorite movies from last year was The Big Short. It brilliantly explained many of the complex factors that set in motion the collapse of the subprime mortgage market. It also captured the arrogance of the age. But the movie got one thing wrong. It suggested that only a few insiders understood what was really happening, when in fact many professionals and academics knew as early as 2003 that a crash was coming.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

For both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, the long and winding campaign road ends in Michigan.

Hillary Clinton will be at Grand Valley State in West Michigan this afternoon and Donald Trump, with Governor Mike Pence, will wrap up his campaign with a rally at 11 p.m. tonight in downtown Grand Rapids.

Earlier today, President Obama held a rally for Hillary Clinton in Ann Arbor, Governor Mike Pence campaigned in Traverse City, and Ivanka and Tiffany Trump campaigned in Hudsonville.

On Sunday, former President Bill Clinton visited churches in Flint, while Donald Trump held a rally for some 8,000 people in Sterling Heights.

Chad Livengood, political reporter for The Detroit News, joined Stateside to help explain what all this attention means.

A photo of a Trump supporter's trailer-parade float called "The Unity Bridge" to showcase his support for Donald Trump, taken a few blocks from where Barack Obama was speaking.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Several protestors expressed their disapproval of Hillary Clinton while President Barack Obama did some last-minute campaigning for her in Ann Arbor today.

While thousands of people waited to see Obama speak, cars plastered with signs supporting Donald Trump and Mike Pence drove by. One such car played political ads against Clinton from large speakers.

Robert Cortis built a so-called "Unity Bridge" onto a trailer towed by his car to showcase his support for Trump.

Michigan is getting the battleground treatment in the final days of Election 2016 with visits from both Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. But there is more at stake than the White House.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Justice Department will monitor the polls in three Michigan cities tomorrow. 

The federal monitors will be in Detroit, Dearborn Heights and Hamtramck.

The Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division plans to deploy more than 500 personnel to 67 jurisdictions in 28 states.

The monitors will be there to enforce federal voting rights laws.

Trump in Michigan on Sunday, Nov. 7th
Cheyna Roth

Michigan is getting battleground state attention from the presidential campaigns. Republican nominee Donald Trump paid a visit to Macomb County, and former President Bill Clinton toured the state to support Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s some mystery about who’s trying to rally support for Libertarian Party candidates in two Michigan state House races.

In recent weeks, fliers promoting the Libertarians starting showing up in mail boxes at homes in the 61st (Portage, MI) and 91st (parts of Muskegon County) districts.   The fliers tout the Libertarians conservative credentials.   But the fliers don’t say who’s behind them. 

Bill Clinton in Flint.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Michigan is getting battleground state attention from the presidential candidates and their top emissaries. Republican nominee Donald Trump is in Macomb County today. Meanwhile, former President Bill Clinton stopped by a couple of churches in Flint before addressing a packed union hall in Lansing.

“We are stronger together,” Clinton told the crowd. “Michigan proves the virtues of solidarity. The UAW proves the virtues of solidarity.”

Clinton said he thinks the race would not be so close if there were more attention on issues.  

"Vote here" sign
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Some Hillary Clinton supporters are trying to convince third party voters in Michigan to “swap” their votes with Democrats in states where the presidential race is not considered close.  

TrumpTraders.org is a website connecting toss-up state Green and Libertarian voters with anti-Donald Trump voters in “safe” states like California.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The major-party candidates are making a final push to win Michigan.

Both Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will be stopping in Michigan, once again, between now and Election Day. In fact, Trump will be making two stops.

Trump will rally supporters this afternoon in Sterling Heights. The GOP nominee is also expected to be back late Monday night for an election eve rally.

Trump’s running mate Mike Pence will campaign in Traverse City Monday. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan's status as a presidential battleground is no longer in question on the eve of the election.

  Barack Obama trounced Republicans here twice, making the state an afterthought the last eight years outside of the primaries. But in 2016, the race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump has tightened and is possibly too close for comfort for Democrats.

Sign directing voters to polling place
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 cropped

After a grueling, seemingly endless campaign season, it looks like we might actually make it to the other side of Election Day 2016. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and I round-up some races to watch in Michigan. We also discuss whether there's potential for trouble at the polls and the slew of presidential candidates and surrogates who visited the state this week.


steve carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - The fight over selfies at Michigan voting booths appears to be over for now.

A federal appeals court said Thursday it won't revisit the decision of one of its three-judge panels.

A federal judge in Grand Rapids had signed an injunction suspending Michigan's ban on ballot photos. But in a 2-1 decision, the order was set aside by the appeals court last week.

The challenge to Michigan's ban isn't dead. But the lawsuit by Joel Crookston won't be fully litigated until after the election.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint officials want more of a say in the state’s investment priorities in their city.

It’s been nearly a year since a state of emergency was declared in Flint because of lead contaminated drinking water.  

State officials point to millions of dollars spent during the past year to help Flint recover from its water crisis, including economic development projects.

But Flint leaders question the state’s spending priorities.

“People have seen us do a ribbon cutting at the Capitol Theater but we still don’t have a grocery store,” says Mayor Karen Weaver.   

Hillary Clinton speaking at Detroit's Eastern Market.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Hillary Clinton was back in Michigan today. The Democratic presidential nominee made a stop at Detroit’s Eastern Market for a rally.

Clinton was greeted by thousands of spectators and several times she encouraged them to vote and even take a friend when they go to the polls.

People kept coming into the venue even after Clinton started. Clinton clearly tried to woo Detroit’s large African American population. She referenced rival Donald Trump’s lawsuit for housing discrimination and his past characterization of black life in Detroit.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The deadline for Flint’s commercial water customers to pay their delinquent bills was today.

Flint’s commercial customers owe the city more than a million dollars.   The city may start the process of cutting off their water service next week.

On Friday, the owners of two apartment complexes paid nearly $30 thousand each to bring their accounts up to date.    

“We’re glad that these account holders have stepped up and done the right thing,” said David Sabuda, Flint’s Interim Chief Financial Officer.

 

Today, we learn what to expect at the polls on Election Day. And, we head to Elderly Instruments for the next rendition of our series Artisans of Michigan

A list of 4 Election Day "Dos"... and 2 "Don'ts"

Nov 4, 2016
Voting sign.
flickr user justgrimes / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This year, more than 7 million Michigan residents are registered to vote. That’s a record number for the state.

So, now that you’re registered, what should you expect on Election Day?

A 2015 survey found that many police agencies devote significantly more time to firearms training than de-escalation techniques.
Flickr - Oregon Department of Transportation / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In 1967, President Lyndon Johnson established a commission to investigate the causes of the urban uprisings  in Detroit and other cities over that summer. That commission, known as the Kerner Commission, came back with a blistering report on white attitudes toward black citizens.

According to the commission’s report, one of the major elements driving racial divisions was police treatment of black citizens. And it specifically warned against the militarization of law enforcement agencies.

A new documentary film demonstrates that, almost 50 years after the Kerner Commission issued its report, many police departments throughout the country have failed to heed that warning.

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