Politics & Government

Politics & Government
7:31 am
Fri February 28, 2014

In this morning's headlines: Foster care, schools, Debbie Dingell

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Governor announces plan to help foster care system

"Gov. Rick Snyder says the state could do a better job protecting foster children if it changed the way it paid for the service. The governor unveiled a report yesterday that says the state should pay foster care agencies based on their performance," Jake Neher reports.

Schools in better financial shape

"There are fewer school districts in Michigan that have budget deficits than there were at the end of 2013, and more districts are pulling themselves out of debt. That’s according to the state Department of Education," Rick Pluta reports.

Debbie Dingell to officially run for U.S. House

"Debbie Dingell is officially launching her campaign today for the U.S. House seat held by her husband," the Associated Press reports.

Politics & Government
5:45 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

If this guy doesn't win in Georgia, he'll try his luck in Michigan

Allan Levene figures he has 10 years left to live, and he really wants to serve in Congress.

... and in Hawaii, and in Minnesota.

Allan Levene, a naturalized U.S. citizen from London, England, is running for Congress in four different states.

He can do that.

The U.S. Constitution states that to be a representative in Congress, you only have to live in the state when you are elected.

Levene says if he doesn't win the primary this May in Georgia, where he lives now, he's going to try his luck in Michigan, Hawaii, and Minnesota.

Why? 

Read more
Politics & Government
5:31 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Snyder seeks overhaul of foster care and how the state pays for it

Michigan Department of Human Services Director Maura Corrigan helps announce the proposal Thursday in Royal Oak.
Jake Neher MPRN

Gov. Rick Snyder says the state could do a better job protecting foster children if it changed the way it paid for the service.

The governor unveiled a report Thursday that says the state should pay foster care agencies based on their performance. Right now, those agencies all get paid the same regardless of their track records or the needs of individual foster children.

Read more
Weekly Political Roundup
5:23 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

A look at Michigan's same-sex marriage challenge, and will another Dingell take office?

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

This week, a challenge to Michigan’s ban on same-sex marriage began in federal court. Michigan voters approved the ban on same-sex marriage and civil unions in 2004. Plus, the longest-serving member of the House, John Dingell announces he will retire. Who will take his seat?

All Things Considered host Jennifer White spoke with Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants.

Weekly Political Roundup for February 27th, 2014.

*Correction - In an earlier version of the audio above, Susan Demas referred to April DeBoer or Jayne Rowse as a "biological" mother of their kid(s). Each is an "adoptive" parent to their kid(s). The audio has been corrected.

Stateside
4:56 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Daniel Howes on the current state of Detroit's bankruptcy

Peter Martorano Flickr

As Mayor Duggan does the heavy lifting to get Detroit actually up on its physical "feet," the other part of its rehab is, of course, the historic bankruptcy.

So many pieces, so many players.

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes has been keeping a close eye on all of it, and he joined us today for our weekly check-in.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:56 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Duggan covers blight, transportation, job development and more in his first State of the City speech

Mike Duggan

Detroit Mayor Michael Duggan delivered his first State of the City speech last night before a packed, invitation-only crowd. And his message was clear: We are going to change what it means to live in Detroit.

Even among those who have a "wait-and-see" attitude, the mayor's speech is being praised for what many believe is a refreshing attention to detail and the sense that a team is at work.

Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:55 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014

You’ve heard it before, folks, time and time again. In today's economy, the more education one attains after high school, the better, right? But what if some students might be better served in other settings, academic or otherwise? Is it time for Michigan to develop some credible alternatives for high school grads? We’ll find out more on today’s show.

Then, we spoke to Daniel Howes about his reporting on Detroit's historic bankruptcy. 

And, Fifth Third Ballpark wants to expand its concessions menu. We took a look at some of the food options fans can vote for, including deep-fried lasagna and a bacon-and-chocolate taco.

Also, how can we keep young entrepreneurs fresh out of college in Michigan? The Michigan Collegiate Innovation Prize awards them for launching their start-ups in state.

And, a new fee system for hunting and fishing goes into effect soon, and it’s the first significant raise in over 15 years. We spoke with Ed Golder of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources about what’s behind this increase.

First on the show, Detroit Mayor Michael Duggan delivered his first State of the City speech last night before a packed, invitation-only crowd. And his message was clear: We are going to change what it means to live in Detroit.

Even among those who have a "wait-and-see" attitude, the mayor's speech is being praised for what many believe is a refreshing attention to detail and the sense that a team is at work.

Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer joined us today.

Politics & Government
2:09 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Frugal Holland takes on biggest one-time debt for natural gas plant

The new natural gas plant will replace Holland's aging coal fired power plant (pictured).
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

The city of Holland will issue $160 million in bonds to build a new power plant. It’s the biggest bond offering the city, the public school district or the city’s publicly owned utility has ever issued.

Holland is home to a huge population of conservatives whose families emigrated from the Netherlands. That's why the city is known for its Tulip Time festival, historic windmill, wooden shoes, and as Holland Mayor Kurt Dykstra puts it, being frugal.

Read more
Politics & Government
10:24 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Duggan: Car insurance, blight, buses among top issues in first State of the City

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is proposing a city-run insurance company to help bring down astronomical premiums.
dugganfordetroit.com

City buses that pick you up when they’re supposed to. Parks that are open to the public, where the grass is cut and the trash is picked up. And car insurance that doesn’t cost more than your car.

Sound like modest proposals? Maybe in most cities. But Detroit is not most cities. And those are some of the promises made by Mayor Mike Duggan, in his first State of the City address tonight.

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Politics & Government
5:40 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Potholes spur debate over road funding

Terrible roads have lawmakers asking for emergency money, and the governor renewing his call for long-term funding.
Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

Lawmakers in the state House want to more than double the amount of emergency money for Michigan roads being ripped apart by nasty winter weather.

Last week, the state Senate approved $100 million to help fix potholes and plow roads. On Wednesday, a state House panel added another $115 million dollars for roads to the bill.  

“I think people are going to look at that and say that’s the way we’re giving back to the public – better roads as quickly as possible, a lot of it going to locals,” said Rep. Joe Haveman, R-Holland, who chairs the House Appropriations Committee.

Read more
Politics & Culture
5:30 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014

Attracting skilled immigrants is good for the economy, right?

Gov. Snyder has proposed a plan to attract 50,000 highly skilled immigrants to the state. It's a plan that would require them to live and work in Detroit as a way to help boost the city’s economy, but some say we’re not doing enough for immigrants already here. On today's program: What can our state do to keep the immigrants who are here while attracting new immigrants?

Then, we all take shortcuts right? Just think about your walk to work, or to the store. Do you cut through a parking lot, or cut across an empty field? Well, there is so much vacant land in Detroit that is exactly what people are doing. So much so, that you can see their tracks from Google Earth. Later in the hour we’ll explore Detroit’s urban footpaths.

But first we talk about how the defense spending cuts will affect Michigan.

Stateside
5:28 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Will defense cuts kill Michigan's 'Warthogs'?

An A-10 Warthog.
user foqus Flickr

Earlier this week, U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel unveiled his latest budget proposal. And it is clear that as the drawdown in Iraq and Afghanistan continues, the Obama administration's priority is now reducing military size and spending.

Secretary Hagel declared that budget reductions cut “so deep, so quickly, that we cannot shrink the size of our military fast enough.”

For instance, the active-duty Army would shrink to its smallest level since just before the U.S. entered World War II. There would be base closings, troop cuts, trimmed salary increases, and the complete elimination of several Air Force aircraft fleets.

That includes the A-10, an aircraft that dates back to the Cold War.

The A-10, also known as "The Warthog," was designed to take out Soviet tanks.

Twenty-four of America's 300 Warthogs are at Selfridge Air National Guard Base near Mt Clemens in Macomb County. Eliminating that fleet would be a gut punch to Selfridge.

Here to explain is Detroit News Washington Bureau Chief David Shepardson.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:53 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Why this Michigan tax reform is getting bipartisan support

The State Capitol.
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

An interview with Kathleen Gray and Jonathan Oosting.

When Governor Snyder pushed through a repeal of the the personal property tax — aka the PPT — in late 2012, it was seen as a good step towards encouraging businesses to set up and expand in Michigan.

But local governments took it right on the chin. As the PPT phased out, many were in line to lose a significant source of revenue.

But there's good news for municipal officials worried about a great big hole in their budgets.

A package of bills has been introduced in the State Senate that would plug that hole, without having to revert to anything like the PPT, which Governor Snyder called "the second-dumbest tax" in Michigan.

And this package seems to have just about everyone on board, including both Democratic and Republican lawmakers.

Here to tell us more is Kathleen Gray from the Detroit Free Press, and MLive’s Jonathan Oosting.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:32 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Does Snyder's immigration plan leave some out?

Detroit's skyline.
Peter Martorano Flickr

Rick Snyder has been one of the most enthusiastic governors in pressing Congress and the White House for immigration reform.

He recently proposed a plan to attract 50,000 highly skilled immigrants to Michigan, essentially "rolling out the red carpet" to attract immigrants to fill vacant technology, engineering, medical and health care jobs in Detroit.

His plan would require immigrants to live and work in bankrupt Detroit, using their skills in science, business or the arts to help power the city back to health.

But some believe the governor's plan overlooks the immigrants who are already here, people who might be able to use a little of that support. And what about immigrants who might not possess an engineering or science degree, but have energy and an entrepreneurial spirit – are they being slighted by the governor's plan?

Here to discuss the future of Michigan’s immigrant population is Steve Tobocman, director of Global Detroit, and Nikki Cicerani, president and CEO of Upwardly Global, a resource for skilled immigrants.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
8:41 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Same-sex marriage, the Dingells, and manufacturing hub make political headlines

Michigan Capitol Building, Lansing, Michigan
Thetoad Flickr

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Christina Shockley talk about the same-sex marriage trial in Michigan, the new Dingell race for Congress and President Obama’s announcement of a new manufacturing hub in metro Detroit.

Week in Michigan Politics interview for 2/26/14

Read more
Stateside
4:25 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Detroit bankruptcy reorganization plan in place; what's the next move for stakeholders?

Lester Graham Michigan Radio

It's been five days since emergency manager Kevyn Orr released the bankruptcy reorganization blueprint, which maps out a way to wipe out billions in debt, spend over half a billion in tearing down abandoned buildings and invest one billion to improve city services.

Now that all stakeholders have had a chance to digest the blueprint, the battle lines are being drawn.

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley joined us today to give us a look ahead.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:20 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

'Main Street Fairness' legislation would add sales tax to online orders

Online shoppers don't have to pay sales tax if the company does not have a physical store in Michigan.
psmag.com

Michigan's new state treasurer, Kevin Clinton,  is calling for Michigan residents to pay the state's 6% sales tax on Internet purchases.

Right now, online shoppers in the state don't have to pay the sales tax to companies that don't have actual stores in Michigan, like Amazon or Overstock.com.

There are currently bills in the state Legislature known as "Main Street Fairness" legislation that would change that.

So will you soon have to pay sales tax on your Amazon purchases? Chad Livengood, Lansing reporter for the Detroit News, joined us today to try and answer that question.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:19 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014

We've almost all done it – you might have even done it just today: Made a purchase online.

But have you ever wondered why you have to pay sales tax on online purchases from some retailers like Target, but not others, like Amazon? There's new legislation in Lansing that might change that. We found out more on today's show.

Then, close your eyes. Now, picture a farmer. What comes to mind? You probably pictured a man, but more women are raising crops now in Michigan. We took a look at what's behind the rise in female farmers.

And, it was the most infamous event of one of the most painful and divisive times in Michigan's history. A new play at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History explores the Algiers incident which occurred during the Detroit riots. 

First on the show, it's been five days since emergency manager Kevyn Orr released the bankruptcy reorganization blueprint, which maps out a way to wipe out billions in debt, spend over half a billion in tearing down abandoned buildings and invest $1 billion to improve city services.

Now that all stakeholders have had a chance to digest the blueprint, the battle lines are being drawn.

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley joined us today to give us a look ahead.

Politics & Government
2:23 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Reports: Debbie Dingell to run for her husband's seat in Congress

Debbie Dingell.
Wayne State University

A day after Rep. John Dingell (D-Michigan) announced that he will retire at the end of his term this year, it appears that Debbie Dingell will announce Friday that she will run for her husband's seat.

Both the Detroit News and the Detroit Free Press say sources are telling them Debbie Dingell will announce her intent to run this Friday.

John Dingell hinted at her intentions during his retirement announcement yesterday.

"If she runs, I will vote for her,"  John Dingell said.

More from Kathleen Gray at the Detroit Free Press:

Debbie Dingell, 60, is the other half of one of Washington’s most powerful political couple. She has been a member of the Democratic National Committee for years, is a member of the Wayne State University Board of Trustees and has held high level positions with General Motors.

She will have about eight weeks to collect at least 1,000 valid signatures from voters in her district to qualify for the ballot.

Detroit bankruptcy
11:46 am
Tue February 25, 2014

LIVE CHAT: Tom Sugrue takes your questions about the future of Detroit

Tom Sugrue
Department of History University of Pennsylvania

Tom Sugrue wrote the book "The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit."

Sugrue is a Detroit native and a professor of history and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. He will be one of the keynote speakers at this Thursday's Detroit Policy Conference.

Detroit Free Press business writer John Gallagher, an author of a few books on Detroit himself, is hosting an online chat with Sugrue at noon today.

Sugrue recently told Gallagher that he leans "toward the pessimistic side" on the continuum of views about the future of Detroit.

Jump in the conversation below. They'll start at noon today.

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