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racism

Got Privilege?
White Privilege Conference

The focus will be on race and privilege as hundreds of people gather in Grand Rapids for the 19th Annual White Privilege Conference from April 4 to April 7.

woman holding a dave levinthal blackface polaroid
Courtesy of David Pilgrim / Ferris State University

Ferris State University’s Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia has an important mission: to use objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice.

The museum recently received a significant donation to help towards that mission.

An anonymous donor has given them 135 large-format Polaroid prints from photographer David Levinthal’s famous and controversial Blackface series.

A new book from Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley is a compilation of essays examining the lasting legacy of slavery
Courtesy of Wayne State University Press

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley joined Stateside today and read from her new book The Burden: African Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery.

Ian Freimuth / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The Next Idea

The city of Grand Rapids is widely considered a great place to do business, unless you’re black. A 2015 study in Forbes magazine found that it was the second-worst city in the nation in terms of being economically friendly to African-Americans. An organization that works to promote entrepreneurship in Grand Rapids has started a pitch contest that’s meant to encourage startup ideas from everyone — especially people of color.

Courtesy of Tim Herd

Recently the Annie E. Casey Foundation released a report that found Michigan’s African-American kids are struggling in school.

There’s a nationwide disparity between the education kids of color and white kids receive. If kids of color end up at a predominantly white college, it’s not clear they will get the resources and support they need.

Ann Arbor Police Department

The Ann Arbor Police Department is offering a $2,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of men who allegedly spray-painted racist messages in an alley off the 600 block of East Liberty Street.

The men are suspected of spray painting hateful messages on a mural in an alley.  The messages read "Free Dylann Roof," (the white supremacist who killed nine African Americans at a church in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015) and "I hate [n-word]."

Courtesy of RobinDiAngelo.com

Last week we brought you a conversation centered around this question: What can white people do about racism in America?

Robin DiAngelo, an author, consultant and former professor of education, joined Stateside today to continue that conversation. She's author of the book, What Does it Mean to Be White? Developing White Racial Literacy.

Courtesy of Wayne State University

What can white people do about racism in America?

Tracy Samilton

Just like last year, racist messages have been found scrawled on campus at the University of Michigan.

And just like last year, angry students confronted UM President Mark Schlissel at a meeting in the Michigan Union, with a frustrated Schlissel assuring them he was on their side, and everything possible was being done to find the perpetrators.

Police are "looking at video, they're interviewing people," he said.

But so far, just like last year, no one's been caught spreading the hate.  Schlissel asked the students for ideas on how to do more and how to actually prevent the incidents, as many of the students are demanding.

Some students, like senior Stephen Wallace, think video cameras should be installed in the residence halls and other places on campus to catch the perpetrators.

UpNorth Memories - Donald (Don) / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

The Cobo Convention Center in Detroit has hired a company to dive into the possibility of selling the center's naming rights.

Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley calls it "incidental good news" that 1950s-era Mayor Albert Cobo's name would be removed from the center should the naming rights be sold. Cobo was controversial in that his urban renewal plans displaced African Americans in Detroit – a lot of them.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

People in the Howell area gathered Thursday night at the First Presbyterian Church for a special "prayer service for racial harmony and peace," singing hymns, reciting prayers, and listening to a sermon by Pastor Judi McMillan.

McMillan says she decided to hold the service to help the many people in her congregation who are feeling distressed after seeing the racial violence in Charlottesville.

They want to know what to do, she says.

mike duggan shaking a woman's hand
dugganfordetroit.com

At the 2017 Mackinac Policy Conference this week, Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan flatly explained to a mostly white audience the systematic racism that shaped the city of Detroit and the surrounding region. This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessnberry talk about the impact of Duggan's speech and his vision for Detroit's future.

Wikimedia Commons

Three emails containing racist and anti-Semitic content were sent to students in the computer science and engineering departments at the University of Michigan Tuesday night.

The emails, which were made to look as though they were sent by a university professor and graduate student, had the subject lines "African American Student Diversity" and "Jewish Student Diversity."

According to University of Michigan officials, the emails were the result of a spoof, or imitation, of two U-M faculty members.

Images of the e-mails have been shared on Twitter:

Courtesy: St. Louis Public Radio

Racial tensions between white people and people of color are reaching levels not seen since the 1960s and ‘70s.

“I don’t think these are radical ideas, to act justly, to think deeply, to think critically," Kuilema said. "In fact in a post-truth moment, I think that’s what we need more of.”
Ryan Grimes / Michigan Radio

 


To some, the idea of a “watchlist” raises uncomfortable thoughts and worries about infringement on people’s constitutional rights.

There’s a basis in our history for those concerns: the “Red Scare” from Senator Joe McCarthy in the 1950s. The post-9/11 Terrorist Watchlist, with its various secondary lists, such as the no-fly list.

As lawsuits challenge the constitutionality of these watchlists, courts are ruling that these lists are treading on due process rights spelled out in the Constitution.

And now there’s a new website called Professor Watchlist. Its self-described mission is to “expose and document college professors who discriminate against conservative students and advance leftist propaganda in the classroom.”

Professor Watchlist is a project of Turning Point USA, a conservative youth group founded by Charlie Kirk in 2012.

Joseph Kuilema is a Calvin College professor who teaches social work. His name was added to the Professor Watchlist a few weeks ago because of an op-ed he wrote addressing institutional racism and white privilege.

Protestors stand outside Roseville Community Schools building urging the removal of Vice President Alfredo Francesconi
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

The vice president of the Roseville Community Schools Board of Education is facing public criticism over racist, Islamaphobic, and transphobic posts on his Facebook page. 

A group of around 20 protestors gathered outside the district's administration building before a school board meeting on Monday night. The protestors moved inside during the meeting and urged the school board to remove Alfredo Francesconi from his position. 

"Pressure Makes Diamonds: Becoming the Woman I Pretended to Be"
Courtesy of Valerie Graves

 

You may not know her name, but it’s a good bet you know her work.

Valerie Graves has worked in the creative departments at the nation’s leading advertising firms. She’s been creative director for top Fortune 500 accounts like General Motors, Ford, Burger King, AT&T, Pepsi and more. She’s been a top executive for Motown Records, and she was creative consultant to President Bill Clinton.

Advertising Age named her one of the “100 Best and Brightest” in the industry.

“The biggest fear is that we would go backwards into fear rather than forward into hope. That we’d go backwards into polarization, not forward into unity. We’ve made an awful lot of progress in the last 50 years, and that progress is now threatened.”
Laura Weber / MPRN

 

A week ago, we woke up to the news that Donald Trump is our president-elect.

Since that day, we’ve seen a flood of reported hate incidents across the country.

agilitynut.com / File photo

A group of people met in Albion last night in an attempt to unify the community after someone vandalized several buildings downtown.

Graph showing racial attacks and harassment since Election Day.
Souther Poverty Law Center

The Michigan Department of Civil Rights continues to receive increased reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities following Tuesday's election.

Agustin Arbulu is the director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights. He says many of the attacks are related to things President-elect Donald Trump said throughout his campaign.

“I think this election had a very negative climate for people on both sides, so it’s not surprising that there are people struggling with the result,” he says.

Motown31 / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Students across the state are seeing racially charged attacks this week.

Most of the verbal harassment in Michigan schools has been targeting students of color and religious minorities.

A video of middle school students in Royal Oak chanting "build the wall" has already gone viral.

Agustin Arbulu is the director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights.

Students holding signs at a protest outside of Ford Hall on Eastern Michigan University's campus.
Bryce Huffman

Eastern Michigan University students and faculty are frustrated with the racist graffiti discovered on campus earlier this week.

Hundreds of them gathered to peacefully protest outside of Ford Hall on EMU's campus, where a racial slur targeting black students was spray-painted.

This is the third separate instance of graffiti with a racist message towards black students within two months.

University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

When racist fliers were found in two buildings on the University of Michigan campus earlier this fall, university officials were quick to respond.

First, President Mark Schlissel called a “community conversation” at which students, faculty, staff, and other community members could express their thoughts and feelings. The following week, the University launched its five-year Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategic Plan.

The timing of that launch, however, was largely coincidental: the plan had been under development for more than a year. It quickly received criticism from black student activists for failing to do enough to address specific acts of racism on campus.

Courtesy of Lauren Ward

Earlier this month, racist flyers were found in two buildings on the University of Michigan campus.

One of the flyers called on "Euro-Americans" to "Be White" and "stop living in fear." Another flyer provided racist reasons why white women should not date black men.

University President Mark Schlissel called a "Community Conversation" meeting to let people express their thoughts and feelings. And he unveiled a university-wide Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Plan.

Some black student activists are skeptical.

Eastern Michigan University
F. Delventhal / Flickr Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Eastern Michigan University community is once again dealing with racist graffiti on the school's Ypsilanti campus. 

The racial slur targeting black students was found spray-painted on Ford Hall. 

Last month, there were two separate incidents of racist graffiti targeting black students on campus.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Many minority students remain stunned, hurt, and angry, days after racist flyers were found in two buildings on the University of Michigan campus.

One of the flyers called on "Euro-Americans" to "Be White" and "stop living in fear."

Another flyer gave racist reasons why white women should not date black men.

University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel called a "Community Conversation" meeting on Sunday afternoon to let people express their feelings and thoughts.

The Michigan Union on the U of M's campus.
Andrew Horne / Wikimedia Commons

The University of Michigan removed several racist flyers posted on campus today.

One flier explained “Why White Women Shouldn’t Date Black Men.” Others told white people to stop “apologizing” and “living in fear” and “be white.”

On EMU's campus.
user F Delventhal / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Two incidents of racist graffiti found on Eastern Michigan University’s campus in Ypsilanti have sparked protests and dialogue between students and faculty.

The first racial slur was found spray painted on a wall outside King Hall this past Tuesday:

John Auchter / Michigan Radio

Telling the wife of your boss at a dinner party that she is a racist is not a career enhancing move. Turns out, people don't like to be called racist — even if they are.

Let me explain.

Dr. Nia Heard-Garris sits down with Cynthia Canty for an interview on Stateside.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Whenever there's a story of violence that takes over the news cycle, parents face a challenge: How much do you tell your child? How do you answer your child's questions? Do you wade right into what happened and why? Or do you divert them, and try to give them something different to think about?

For parents of color, these challenges come up with each act of police-related violence on black males, or violence aimed at police officers who are just doing their jobs, such as in Dallas or Baton Rouge.

Dr. Nia Heard-Garris is a pediatrician doing research on the impact racism, and these racially-charged news stories, can have on children.

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