rip current

Environment & Science
3:20 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

South Haven implements beach safety program, pays drowning victim's family

Waves in Lake Michigan
screen grab from YouTube video

Aaron Mueller of the Kalamazoo Gazette reports on a settlement reached between the family of a 2009 drowning victim, and the "Michigan Municipal Risk Management Association." Martin Jordan of St. Charles, IL drowned in Lake Michigan after being caught up in strong rip currents.

More from Mueller:

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Education
7:18 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Pres. Obama eyes Michigan high schoolers' safety project

President Barack Obama listens to Spencer Ottarson, 19, center, and Julie Xu, 17, right, both from Williamston, Mich., as they explain their 'Offshore Rip Current Alert System (ORCA), Monday, April 22, 2013, during the White House Science Fair
Pablo Martinez Monsivai/Greenwichtime.com

President Barack Obama has had a briefing from two Lansing-area teenagers about their new technology for warning swimmers about dangerous off-shore currents.

19-year-old Spencer Ottarson and 17-year-old Julie Xu represented Williamston High School on Monday as of 12 teams that presented their science projects at the White House's third science fair.

Obama examined their Offshore Rip Current Alert System, which was on display in the East Garden.

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Lake Michigan
12:14 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

Coast Guard warning Lake Michigan swimmers about rip currents

Rip current mechanism: breakers cross sand bars off the shore, the water travels back to sea through the gap in the sand bars, creating a fast "rip"
(courtesy of National Weather Service, Wilmington, NC)

Search efforts continue for two swimmers who were caught up Tuesday in rip currents off the coast of Saugatuck.     Lake Michigan’s eastern shore has seen strong rip currents this week. 

U.S. Coast Guard petty officer Lauren Jorgenson  says people swimming in the Great Lakes should be aware of the danger of currents that can pull swimmers away from the beach.  

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Environment
3:01 pm
Sun June 5, 2011

Rip currents threaten the lives of Great Lakes swimmers

Rip current mechanism: breakers cross sand bars off the shore, the water travels back to sea through the gap in the sand bars, creating a fast "rip" current
Backcomp.gif: National Weather Service, Wilmington, NC

This week, state lawmakers will discuss what can be done to better protect people from rip currents on the Great Lakes. It’s estimated that about 30 people drowned in the Great Lakes last year because of rip currents. 

Rip currents form when powerful winds or surges of water press along the shoreline.  The water must eventually flow back out.  When it does the rip current created can prove too strong for even the best swimmer to escape. 

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