robo-calls

A woman protesting robocalls
User: JMacPherson / Flickr

'Tis the season – for political campaigning and ceaseless robocalls.

Now that the August primaries are over, we're getting a breather. But it won't be long before the campaigns start cranking out those robocalls for the November general election.

Those political robocalls are exempt from the do-not-call rules, those that are supposed to protect us from marketing and sales calls.

Aaron Foss is the CEO of a company with a name that says it all: NOMOROBO. Foss is busy finding ways to fight off robocalls.

Foss says beginning this political season, NOMOROBO will try a new approach to block all political robocalls, unless consumers “opt-in” to accept these robocalls.

“We try to strike the balance between politicians being perfectly legal to make the calls, and everybody being in their perfect right to not accept the calls,” says Foss.

*Listen to the interview with Aaron Foss above.

sushi ina / flickr

Governor Rick Snyder has signed a law that outlaws efforts to require disclosure of the donors behind so-called “issue ads.” It appears to be a reversal of one of his campaign pledges.  

The governor came out against anonymous issue ads in a 2010 campaign white paper. Issue ads tell people to “call” or “contact” a politician without expressly advocating for how they should vote.

Photozou

Next year is an election year. That means lots of campaign literature in the mail, lots of ads on the television,   and, maybe worst of all, robo-calls. Those are the recorded calls that automatically dial your phone…usually right at dinner time. There are a lot of them now, but there could be a lot more in the future.

Even one of the guys who makes robo-calls happen knows most people don’t really like them.

“Everybody hates them. I think that they’re universally hated.”