Rosa Parks

Arts & Culture
4:49 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Stateside: Rosa Parks goes to Washington

Rosa Parks life-size statue to be placed in National Statuary Hall
via US Postal Service

In 2005, the Daub and Firmin Sculpture Studio of California was commissioned to create a bronze statue of Rosa Parks.

Parks, who would have been 100 this month, will be the first life-sized representation that is approved and funded by Congress since 1873.

Her likeness will also be the first full-sized statue of an African-American woman in the National Statuary Hall. 

Seven years after the commission was placed, Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty spoke with one of her sculptors, Eugene Daub. 

You can listen to the full Stateside interview above.

Culture & History
5:42 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Stateside: The life and legacy of Rosa Parks

Ebony Magazine

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Rosa Parks.

She was small in stature, quiet, humble, and yet a woman who made a giant mark on the pages of American history. A woman hailed as a true icon of the civil rights movement.

Her deliberate, well-thought-out act of civil disobedience galvanized the struggle for civil rights, not only here in America, but around the world.

A year later, in 1956, Rosa Parks and her husband Raymond moved to Detroit where she lived until her death in 2005.

We take a closer look at the life and legacy of Rosa Parks with Wayne State University Professor of History, Danielle McGuire.

Her book is entitled "At The Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance: A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power."

She joined us now from the Rosa Parks celebration, the National Day of Courage, at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn.

Politics & Government
5:08 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Stateside: Celebrating Rosa Parks' 100th birthday at the Henry Ford

RosaParks.com

The following is a summary of an audio segment. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Today marks the 100th birthday of civil rights leader, Rosa Parks.

Back in 1955, the south was segregated.

And on December 1 of that year, a 42-year old seamstress refused to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama and was arrested for it.

That simple act of courage helped spark the civil rights movement in America.

Today, that bus lives in the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn.

Stateside’s Emily Fox takes us on a tour of the exhibit where she talked with museum visitors and Christian Overland, the executive Vice President of the Henry Ford Museum.

Politics
12:48 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

President Obama sits in the Rosa Parks bus

President Obama sits on the Rosa Parks bus at the Henry Ford Museum following a fundraising event in Dearborn, Michigan yesterday.
Pete Souza White House

This photo of President Barack Obama sitting on the Rosa Parks Bus at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn is making the rounds on Facebook today.

WDIV's Guy Gordon posted the photo, saying:

No matter your politics, a compelling picture of the President at Henry Ford Museum yesterday. An emotional moment for him. A nexus of history. — at Henry Ford Museum.

Mr. Obama was in Dearborn yesterday for a fundraiser at the museum and then later at a private dinner  hosted by Denise Ilitch.

The Detroit Free Press reports Obama described his visit to supporters:

"I actually had the chance to sit in Rosa Parks' bus," Obama said. "I just sat there for a moment and pondered the courage and tenacity that is part of our very recent history, but is also a part of that long line of folks -- sometimes nameless, oftentimes didn't make the history books -- but who constantly insisted on their dignity, their stake in the American Dream."

The bus was brought to the Henry Ford Museum in 2001 after the Museum outbid others, including the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.

Obama is sitting across the aisle from where Ms. Parks sat on that historic day in 1955.

Here's more on how the bus was found and restored.