rural michigan

Stateside
12:04 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Poverty rates are high in Michigan's rural counties

Credit Steven Depolo / Flickr

When we think about poverty, we tend to picture cities.

But a recent series in Bridge Magazine brought attention to poverty in rural communities in Michigan. The poverty rate in rural areas is higher than the rate in urban areas.

The articles were written by Pat Shellenbarger for Bridge Magazine.

Shellenbarger joins Stateside today, along with Jane Zehnder-Merrell, the Kids Count project director of the Michigan League for Public Policy.

“Of the 13 counties in Michigan with poverty rates above 20%, 11 of those are rural counties,” said Shellenbarger.

Shellenbarger wrote that poverty is not exclusive to poor rural counties, such as Lake County. Poor people live in wealthy rural counties as well, like Livingston, and the poverty rate for children has increased.

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Stateside
4:36 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Rural areas of Michigan have fewer health insurance options

Rural Michigan does not get all of the same health insurance options as the bigger cities.
Credit user acrylicartist / MorgueFile.com

One of the most important aspects of the Affordable Care Act is consumer choice. More choice leads to more competition among insurers, and that can mean lower costs to consumers.

But, as Michiganders shopped for health coverage on the federal marketplace, the amount of choice was not even.

If you lived in Wayne, Oakland or Macomb Counties, you got to choose from 55 insurance plans. If you lived in Delta County in the Upper Peninsula, you were only offered 5 plans, all of them from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan.

Josh Fangmeier is a health policy analyst with the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:36 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, April 29, 2014

One of the most important aspects of the Affordable Care Act is consumer choice. More choice means more competition among insurers, and that can lead to lower costs for consumers.

But if you live in a rural area, you may not have a whole lot of choices when it comes choosing a health plans. On today's Stateside, we took a look at health care in Michigan's rural areas.

Then, Michigan’s new crowdfunding law opens the door to everyday people who want to invest in Michigan-based startups and small businesses. We heard about the benefits and risks that come with crowdfunding for equity.

And, we spoke with Garrison Keillor about the 40th anniversary of A Prairie Home Companion and his upcoming book.

First on the show, Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr is in Lansing today and tomorrow, getting face-time with the lawmakers whose vote is crucial to the so-called grand bargain, the complicated deal to protect city retirees and the collection at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Orr heads to Lansing with a new piece of the puzzle in hand: a tentative five-year deal reached Monday with AFSCME, Detroit's largest employee union.

Detroit News reporter Chad Livengood joined us today to give us an idea of what progress has been made and what lies ahead for the city.

Politics & Government
12:05 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Bill to pull the plug on telephone landlines clears Michigan Legislature

Critics of the bill worry it could leave people in some areas of the state without affordable and reliable phone service.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

It could soon be easier for phone companies to end traditional landline service in Michigan.

The state Senate gave final legislative approval to the measure Thursday. Senate Bill 636, which was championed by AT&T, now goes to Gov. Rick Snyder’s desk.

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