seasons

Environment & Science
3:20 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

What fall smells like in Michigan and around the world

For many Michiganders, leaf smells are a major indicator of fall's arrival.
user hyperboreal Flickr

Wet leaves, cider, campfire — for many Michiganders, these are the smells of fall.

But our friends over at WNYC’s Radiolab wanted to get an idea of what autumn smells like all over the world.

So with the help of Google Maps and talented olfactory nerves, the Radiolab crew is compiling a map that highlight the scent of autumn around the U.S. and beyond.

Here are some the responses so far from Michigan. Leaves seem to be the big winner:

  • “Salt, smoke and sweet rotting apples”

  • “Leaf-burning, skunks”

  • “Cider spices and dead leaves”

  • “Cold, crispy leaves and firepits”

  • “Musky leaves”

And the rest of the world:

  • “Roasted chestnuts and sea salt” - Istanbul, Turkey

  • “Roasted chestnuts, cigarette smoke, wet asphalt, diesel fumes, fresh-baked bread” - Lyon, France

  • “Salt and damp seaweed” - Coronado, CA

  • “Its spring here [sic]” - Melbourne, Australia

- Melanie Kruvelis, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Science
1:11 pm
Fri September 23, 2011

Fall is officially here!

Michigan leaf.
user: James Jordan / flickr

The autumnal equinox happened today at 5:05 a.m. ET. It marks the beginning of autumn in the northern hemisphere and spring in the southern hemisphere.

It’s the time of year when temperatures start to drop and the days start to get shorter.

Every year there are two equinoxes, one in March that marks the beginning of spring and one in September that marks the beginning of fall.

National Geographic explains:

The autumnal equinox and vernal equinox are also the only days of the year when a person standing on the Equator can see the sun passing directly overhead. On the Northern Hemisphere's autumnal equinox, a person at the North Pole would see the sun skimming across the horizon, signaling the start of six months of darkness. On the same day, a person at the South Pole would also see the sun skim the horizon, beginning six months of uninterrupted daylight.

Equinoxes explained:

Environment
5:50 pm
Tue December 21, 2010

There's hope! Days getting longer in northern hemisphere

Sunrise during the winter solstice in Stonehenge in 2005
Tom Goskar - Flickr

I was hoping to get to this post sooner, but the day just got away from me.

Today seemed unusually short. That's because it IS the shortest day of the year.

And soon, very soon, the days in the northern hemisphere will start to get longer.

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Science/Medicine
1:12 pm
Mon December 20, 2010

Lunar eclipse tonight

A lunar eclipse in 2008
D'Arcy Norman - wikimedia commons user

Update December 21st, 2:00 a.m.:

Well, I woke up... the Earth's shadow is passing over the moon right now. NASA says it'll be in full eclipse starting at 2:41 a.m. and then the shadow will start slipping off the moon at 3:53 a.m.

Welcome to the shortest day of the year! Now... time for bed.

December 20th, 1:12 p.m.

It's not as special as a solar eclipse, which happens in one spot (say in Detroit, MI) around once every several hundred years, but a lunar eclipse is still pretty cool. Even if it does happen around twice a year.

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