Stateside

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Flickr user Justin Leonard / Flickr

Water is one of Michigan's most abundant and precious resources, but the rules for governing its use aren't always clear.

Wayne State Law Professor and water law specialist Noah Hall joins us to discuss the rules surrounding the use of creeks and rivers. 

Today on Stateside:

* Lon Johnson, chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, is thinking about a job-change

* Consumers are turning to social media as a way to get a company’s attention rather than getting lost in a voice mail jungle when they call some 800-number

* Why it’s important for Michigan to develop its own story on The Next Idea

* There's a new competition show starting tonight on the History channel. Forged in Fire challenges contestants to make medieval weapons. One contestant hails from Detroit

Anders Adermark / Flickr http://ow.ly/OE5HR

Popping the cork on a bottle of Champagne can make an occasion extra-special.

The reputation of real Champagne comes largely from the industry standard that requires the Champagne to be very consistent from one year to the next – unlike ordinary red and white wines, which can be very different from year to year.

Making Champagne at the big houses of famous names comes down to two or three sets of taste buds in the heads of the wine team.

Forge Detroit / Facebook

A new competition show called Forged in Fire starts tonight on the cable channel History.

Contestants will be challenged to make swords and knives, including period-specific weapons like medieval broadswords or ancient throwing blades.

Beachgoers on a Lake Michigan beach in the Upper Peninsula.
Joseph Novak / Creative Commons

So you want to stroll along a Great Lakes beach. Can a cottage-owner come shoo you away?

Today we looked at the water rules in the Great Lakes State.

SEO / flickr

More and more, consumers are realizing that social media is a much better way to get a company’s attention than getting lost in a voice mail jungle when you call some 1-800-phone line.

Michigan Radio’s social media producer Kimberly Springer joined us to talk about what companies and consumers are learning about using social media.

Screenshot/Chrysler

The Next Idea

In 2009, the headline of a Time magazine cover story read “The Tragedy of Detroit” with a shadowy photo of a blighted factory in the background. The national press was brutal.

Flickr user Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The list of presidential hopefuls grows each week, and it seems voters here in Michigan and across the country are unimpressed with this crop of candidates.

WDIV/Detroit News survey released yesterday shows Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Jeb Bush, Rand Paul, Marco Rubio and Scott Walker each drew more “unfavorable” than “favorable” ratings.

Today on Stateside:

 

* As Detroit gets back up on its feet following the bankruptcy, we've seen the development action centered on downtown. Now a developer is stepping up to put ideas and dollars into a west-side Detroit neighborhood.

 

* Bargainers for the UAW and Detroit automakers will get down to brass tacks next month. Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes previews the talks between the UAW and Detroit automakers. Talks start next month.

 

UAW

Bargainers for the UAW and the Detroit automakers will get down to brass tacks the week of July 13.

The tug of war will be between workers who expect to get back some of what they gave up during the downturn of 2008-09, and auto executives who can't fall back into the practices that got them in such trouble. 

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes believes it's all going to come down to who's looking ahead through the windshield or at the past in the rear-view mirror.

"As you go into negotiations, you can't help but think that the UAW and their membership are looking at the fact that over the past four years of the current contract, GM, Ford, and what is now FCA or Chrysler, have made $67.7 billion of profits in North America." 

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Ahya Simone doesn’t particularly like the word transition when she describes being a transgender woman.

Simone was born and raised in Detroit. From an early age she was drawn to the performing arts, singing in church choir and, eventually, while attending Cass Technical High School in Detroit, learning to play the harp.

But it wasn’t until she was in college at Wayne State University that Simone decided it was time to get real, and start living her truth.

Here's a video of Ahya Simone performing with her harp. 

With each new idea, momentum builds in Detroit

Jun 18, 2015
Courtesy of Focus: HOPE

The Next Idea 

Innovation is at the center of Detroit’s inclusive recovery. Yet this word “innovation” is used so often that its meaning tends to get a little obscured.

Rather than the narrow definition of technological advancement, the meaning of innovation we should use in Detroit is about doing things differently, redefining our future, and challenging ourselves to move beyond business as usual. 

Detroit skyline.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Development action is centered on downtown Detroit as the city gets back on its feet after bankruptcy. Corktown and Midtown have seen a lot of new construction, and now a developer is stepping up to put ideas and money into a west side Detroit neighborhood, the Herman Kiefer complex.

Led by Dr. E. LaQuint Weaver, the Hallelujah Singers are a group of men and women singing together in an all-star community choir.
Andrew Sacks

The documentary film Let's Have Some Church Detroit Style was the Audience Choice winner at the second annual Freep Film Festival earlier this year.

And on June 20, it’s coming to Ann Arbor’s Michigan Theater.

Today on Stateside:

Andy Ryan

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

When Brad Meltzer sent his first novel to 20 publishers, he got 24 rejection letters.

His next novel became a New York Times bestseller.

Meltzer has lived at the top of the bestseller lists ever since, and he’s just released his newest political thriller: The President’s Shadow.

Success has not made Meltzer forget his past. In fact, he draws directly on his initial failure for inspiration to continue writing.

courtesy of Big Rock Chophoue

You might not expect to find thousands of bees at a popular, busy restaurant, especially one in a big city.

But that's exactly what you'll find at Big Rock Chophouse in Birmingham.

A recent survey suggests that Michigan voters don't like a lot of what they see in the upcoming political season.
National Ave

Presidential candidates keep hopping on the bandwagon. ‘Tis the season, after all.

dream hampton

On October 23, 2011 a 19-year-old Detroiter named Shelly Hilliard was murdered and dismembered.

It happened just three days after she cooperated with suburban police, according to a civil suit filed by her family against the Madison Heights Police Department.

  • Amir Hekmati has been in Iranian prison for nearly four years. Today, Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint Township, proposed a resolution stating that Iran must release the Americans it is holding and provide information on any other Americans it may be holding. Kildee joined us to talk about his proposal.
  • Two Michigan groups hoping to legalize marijuana in Michigan can begin collecting signatures to put the question on the 2016 ballot after a state elections board signed off on the groups' petition language.
Sarah Price's debut album "SarahTonin" comes out this week
Toko Shiiki

Sarah Price is the choir teacher at Saline High School, and this week she is releasing her debut CD, SarahTonin.

Michigan voters may see marijuana on the ballot in 2016
user Coleen Whitfield / flickr

Two Michigan groups hoping to legalize marijuana in Michigan can begin collecting signatures to put the question on the 2016 ballot after a state elections board signed off on the groups' petition language.

Congressman Dan Kildee speaks at the announcement of the USDA's Regional Conservation Partnership Program on Tuesday, May 27, 2014.
U.S. Department of Agriculture / flickr

It seems there isn't much Congress can agree on these days.

But there was an exception to that Monday night concerning the plight of Amir Hekmati, 31, of Flint.

Roger Sutherland

With it being National Pollinator Week, we continue our series, "The Business of Bees."

It started centuries ago, scooping honey out of a tree.

Today, there's big money in pollination.

Roger Sutherland is a retired biology professor, and has been keeping bees for over 50 years. 

AcrylicArtist / morgueFile

Michigan’s state apiarist – call him the “bee czar” – says a surge of interest by backyard beekeepers is helping the struggling honeybee population.

Michael Hansen says a decade ago, you might have seen 100 or 200 people at the Michigan Beekeepers' Association annual meeting. This year? There were about 1,000.

Today on Stateside:

- We're seeing the first West Nile virus activity in Michigan. Dr. Eden Wells, chief medical executive for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services tells us what we can do to protect ourselves from the virus.

- Ann Arbor City Councilman Stephen Kunselman thinks he has a way to help homeless people in his city.
The tiny house concept is gaining support around the country as a way for communities to provide affordable housing. 

user trebol-a / Flickr

Combine heavy rain, humid and warm weather, mosquitos, three dead crows ... and what you get is the first West Nile virus activity in Michigan in 2015.

Dr. Eden Wells is the chief medical executive for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and she says it's not uncommon to see birds infected in June each year. 

People who are elderly, poor, or not white have new ideas too

Jun 15, 2015
Flickr/George A. Spiva Center for the Arts

The Next Idea

“We never know where the next big innovation is going to come from.”

That’s a common phrase we hear over and over, and it is true. 

Today on Stateside:

Michigan Legislature
Matthileo / Flickr

"I had to make a decision and I believe this is an appropriate decision that makes sure that most kids end up in loving families."

That was Gov. Rick Snyder's explanation about why he signed a package of bills today allowing faith-based adoption agencies to refuse to work with same-sex prospective parents based on a religious objection.

It is widely seen as a pre-action to whatever the U.S. Supreme Court might rule in a same-sex marriage case expected later this month.

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