Stateside

this is the correct one

Cynthia Canty with Heben Nigatu and Tracy Clayton from BuzzFeed's "Another Round" podcast.
Stateside Staff

One of the internet's biggest podcasts is coming to Ann Arbor to do a live show.

At the invitation of the School of Social Work People of Color Collective at the University of Michigan, Buzzfeed's hit podcast Another Round will hold its first live show at the Michigan Union on Thursday, April 14.

  • A $200,000 question in Lansing City Hall as the city attorney abruptly resigns yet gets a full year's salary and more. Judi Browne Clarke is president of the Lansing City Council.
Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s something brewing around Lansing’s City Hall.

On March 4, Lansing’s city attorney Janene McIntyre resigned voluntarily, but the Lansing State Journal reports that McIntyre was still paid $160,000 in salary and accrued benefits. McIntyre and Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero have repeatedly declined to discuss the details about why she left and why she was given such a substantial payment by the city.

Courtesy of Frank Boring

When you ask anyone about women’s professional baseball, the majority of people will make some reference to director Penny Marshall’s 1992 film A League of Their Own. The movie stars Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, and Madonna and tells the story of the real-life Rockford Peaches of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). The league was created to provide sports fans with entertainment while the men – including many star major league baseball players -- were away fighting in World War II. 

  • New water tests from Virginia Tech show lead levels are improving in Flint, but the water is still not safe to drink without a filter.
  • Leading off the show is John U. Bacon as he tackles a number of issues in the Michigan sports world.
duncan c / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

What's in a name? How does it affect the course, or even the length of your life?

That question drove Michigan State University economist Lisa D. Cook to dig into three million death certificates in four states from 1802 to 1970.

And that led to some intriguing findings, especially about the names of black men.

Khalilshah / Flickr

The Next Idea

The list of people who have lost out in our state is too long for this space. The people of Flint, students in Detroit, even the Detroit Lions, all have been beaten by forces beyond their control.

Jim Harbaugh watches closely during Michigan's Spring Game.
MGoBlog / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Last week, the NCAA finally ruled on Jim Harbaugh's satellite football camps for the University of Michigan.

They said that teams are no longer allowed to hold camps outside of their own facilities.

A view of Zug Island from Windsor, Ontario in 2009
user Jamie / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A few years ago, residents in the southern and western parts of Windsor complained of a mysterious noise. It was described as a “hum” sound that brought with it vibrations that were often strong enough to rattle windows.

Here is an example of the "Windsor Hum" that was recorded by Michigan Radio’s Tracy Samilton in May of 2012 (It was digitally enhanced so you are able to hear it on your speakers).

  • Michigan’s Schools of Choice program is 20 years old. The Holland Sentinel recently looked at the impacts on local school districts. We speak with Holland Public Schools Superintendent Brian Davis.
  • Nearly one in four Americans are asked to sign a non-compete agreement when taking a new job.
flickr user Government of Alberta / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


Nearly one in four American workers are asked to sign a non-compete agreement when they take a new job.

This used to be reserved for CEOs and TV anchors, but not anymore.

An article in Fortune reported the sandwich chain Jimmy John's has a non-compete clause which would prevent former employees from working at any nearby restaurant that gets at least 10 percent of its revenue from sandwiches for two years.

wikimedia user motown31 / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


Michigan's Schools of Choice program is now 20 years old.

In some parts of the state, the competition for students can be intense. Public school districts put up yard signs, families are sometimes offered gifts to sign up for a school out of district, and the number of publicly funded, privately run charter schools has increased.

Ray and Laura's Comedy Showcase Facebook Event

A comedy showcase in Hamtramck Saturday night will have a somewhat jarring theme: suicide.

The event is called “Suck It, Suicide,” and is a benefit show performed by Ray and Laura's Comedy Showcase

Proceeds from the event go to Six Feet Over, a non-profit helping people who have lost loved ones to suicide.

Fishing on Lake Huron
U.S. Department of the Interior

The lake trout used to be the fish to catch in the Great Lakes. But by the 1950s, severe overfishing and an infestation of an eel-like, blood-sucking parasite called the sea lamprey had drastically reduced the number of lake trout and other fish.

Then, a fish called the alewife invaded the Great Lakes through man-made canals.

Without enough lake trout to keep them in check, alewife populations exploded, and have since varied wildly year to year. Dead alewives have been spotted washed up on beaches in piles stretching miles along Great Lakes coasts.

In 1964, the Department of Natural Resources hired a fish biologist named Howard Tanner. They asked him to figure out how to deal with the alewife problem, and left him with an order: “Make it spectacular.”

SafeHouse Center executive director Barbara Niess-May joined us to talk about "Start by Believing"
Facebook


When someone is diagnosed with cancer or gets in a car accident, he or she is often surrounded by comfort, support and sympathy.

So why is it that a 14-year-old girl is raped and the attack videotaped, law enforcement responds by peppering her with hundreds of questions before charges are brought?

Its an injustice repeated over and over again, and it has led to a national campaign called “Start by Believing."

This week, Washtenaw County became the first in Michigan to be a Start by Believing county.

  • Barbara Niess-May, executive director of SafeHouse Center, discusses why so many women don’t talk about their sexual assaults, and the national campaign “Start by Believing” to try to change that.
screenshot

The Next Idea

Iceland is one of those countries that you don’t tend to see in the international spotlight.

That changed this week, when the so-called “Panama Papers” were leaked, revealing that a law firm in Panama allegedly set up secret shell companies and offshore accounts to help world power players avoid taxes.

Iceland’s prime minister was the first major casualty of the Panama Papers. He stepped aside after the leaks showed he owned an offshore company with his wife.

But this isn’t the only political upheaval in recent Icelandic history. Following a financial crisis that all but crippled the country, Icelanders decided it was time to rewrite their constitution. And to do so, they turned to crowdsourcing.

  • The shooting spree in Kalamazoo was yet another reminder of a thorny problem for news outlets: how do you report the facts without doing it in a way that inspires a copycat?
  • In a typical presidential election year, the state GOP convention would be a pretty cut-and-dried affair. But this is no typical election year.
Flowers for the victims of the shooting rampage in Tucson, Ariz., on display of the steps of the Capitol in 2011.
Medill DC / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

When a mass shooting takes place in the United States, it is the duty of the media to report the news. However, a recent article in Mother Jones cites research that suggests the sensationalizing of these killings might make the problem worse.

Six weeks ago in Kalamazoo, Uber driver Jason Dalton went on a shooting rampage between picking up passengers. Dalton has confessed to killing six people and wounding two others.

The Man in the City Project
Eric Wheeler

If you’re traveling in Metro Detroit on I-96 you might see something a little out of the ordinary near the Milford Road exit: an orange man.

The orange silhouette of a broad-shouldered man wearing a 1950s-style fedora can be seen on buildings throughout Metro Detroit and in more than 60 locations across the state of Michigan, thanks to the Man In The City Project spearheaded by artist John Sauvé.

The Empire Mine
Cliffs Natural Resources Inc.

The Marquette area recently received some painful news when Lourenco Goncalves, the CEO of Cliffs Natural Resources announced that the Empire Mine would be closing by the end of the year. More than 400 workers from the region are affected by the announcement that iron ore production, that has been a big part of the area’s economy for a long time, will end.

  • A recent legal case in Cass County, Michigan is raising questions about HIV disclosure laws in Michigan. We talk with Trevor Hoppe, sociologist of sexuality, HIV, and the law at the University at Albany-SUNY about the case.
  • State regulators want to find out where lead water pipes are and how many are left in the ground. Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith has been following the story and the results are posted in this handy map.
  • How a vibrant Flint neighborhood was leveled in the name of "urban renewal”. What can we learn from St. John Street in Flint?
In 2010, oil spilled into a creek near the Kalamazoo River from Enbridge Line 6b
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio


It was April of 2010 when Enbridge Line 6b ruptured, spilling more than a million gallons of Canadian heavy crude oil into a creek near Kalamazoo.

It was the largest inland spill in United States history.

That spill gave Michiganders a very good reason to sit up and pay closer attention to the nearly 3,300 miles of hazardous liquid pipelines that weave through our state, particularly Enbridge Line 5, which runs in the Straits of Mackinac.

Michigan Municipal League/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

    

Amid the torrent of headlines about Flint's water calamity, it's far too easy to lose track of the long history of that city.

There are powerful and poignant lessons to be learned in the way rich, vibrant neighborhoods were taken apart and plowed under in the name of "development.”

Communities like the old St. John Street neighborhood.

Charles Winfrey grew up in the St. John Street community. Today he is the executive director of The New McCree Theatre. He joined us today on Stateside

Listen to the full interview below.

flickr user Joe Gratz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0


A recent legal case in Cass County is raising questions about HIV disclosure laws in Michigan.

Trevor Hoppe is a sociologist who specializes in sexuality, HIV and the law. His research studies are titled Punishing Disease and he is co-editor of The War on Sex, a forthcoming collection of essays that examines the criminal regulation of sex.

Hoppe wrote a piece in the Huffington Post about an HIV-positive man in Cassopolis, MI, named Corey Rangel.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/9090732482

The Next Idea

Every year, the United States spends $218 billion growing, transporting, and processing food that no one ever eats. That's billion. The financial, resource, and environmental costs of all the wasted food in the United States is staggering. 

  • Traverse City wants to keep its small-town charms while at the same time drawing talent, growing the economy, accommodating population growth and addressing the lack of affordable housing. Traverse City Mayor Jim Carruthers joins us to talk about his city.
  • Writer Desiree Cooper's new book of short stories takes us right into the hearts of mothers, wives and daughters as she explores questions of race and gender.
Sunset over Traverse City
Jerry / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

How many times have you said this while you’ve been on vacation?

“I wish we could just live here all the time.”

As it turns out, among the thousands who have visited Traverse City over the last couple decades, many of them have said that. And followed through and made that wish come true. It’s becoming more than the National Cherry Festival and a fun place to spend a long weekend in the summer.

Wayne State University Press

Many women can relate to the witching hour. In the middle of the night, you wake up and have trouble falling back to sleep because your mind is racing. Concerns about the upcoming day, anxiety about the mounting to-do list while, oftentimes, your partner sleeps soundly next to you. The Witching Hour is the title of the first story in a collection of “flash fiction” – not short stories – by Detroit-based writer Desiree Cooper, titled Know The Mother.

Pages