Stateside

Stateside
4:39 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

The band Art in America returns after 30 years

Art in America the band back in the 1980's.

Imagine this - a Detroit rock band from the 1980's disappears from the music scene, until a producer in England rediscovers them and helps them put out a new album.

Well, that’s what happened to our next guests. They call themselves Art in America. The band name for three siblings from Michigan, Chris, Dan and Shishonee Flynn. After nearly 30 years they are out with a new album called The Hentschel Sessions.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:11 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

On today's show, we took a look at key election results from around the state, from marijuana to gay rights. How did you vote?  And what's the take away from Election 2013?

Then, we spoke with Michigan singer-songwriter Stewart Franke as he takes us inside his battle with leukemia.

And, we talked Michigan beer. A new film looks at the craft beer scene in our state.

First on the show, it has been quite a journey for a candidate who got booted off the primary ballot, was going to fold his tent and walk away, then was urged to mount a write-in campaign, swept the primary and today, is the new Mayor-Elect of Detroit.

Mike Duggan has become Detroit's first white mayor in 40 years, beating Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek has covered the Duggan campaign and was at the victory party last night. She joined us today.

Stateside
4:58 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

New film about Michigan beer to premiere at the Fillmore Theatre

There's an intriguing movie premiere happening Thursday night at the Fillmore Theatre on Woodward in downtown Detroit.

"The Michigan Beer Film" will be screened along with samples of some of the Michigan brews featured in the film.

We're always happy to talk about Michigan beer here on Stateside, so we welcomed the producer and director of "The Michigan Beer Film", Kevin Romeo. He joined us today from Kalamazoo. 

Listen to the full interview about.

Stateside
4:55 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Jack Lessenberry on the Election Day 2013 results

The Secretary of State says 95.5% of eligible voters are registered
Lars Plougmann Creative Commons

Former medical center chief Mike Duggan will be the next mayor of financially troubled Detroit, beating Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon 55% to 45%. Duggan will be Detroit's first white mayor since Coleman Young was elected in 1973 as the city's first black mayor.

So, we heard from Mike Duggan and results from around the state, we looked today for some perspective on what these results mean for Michigan.

Jack Lessenberry - Michigan Radio's Political Analyst - joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:45 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith talks about the Saugatuck-Douglas vote

Signs for and against the proposed merger are seen all over Saugatuck and Douglas.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith talks about the Saugatuck-Douglas vote

We turn now to the West Side of the state.

That's where Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith has been following a ballot proposal calling for the merger of Saugatuck and Douglas, two smaller cities just south of Holland.

Lindsey Smith joined us today to talk about what the voters said.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:38 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody talks about votes to decriminalize marijuana

Voters approved the use of medical marijuana in 2008.
USFWS

Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody talks about votes to decriminalize marijuana

Marijuana was on the ballot on Lansing, Jackson and Ferndale, and voters in all three cities said "yes" to decriminalizing pot.

Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody joined us today to talk about the impact of this vote.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:36 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek talks about Mike Duggan's win in Detroit

Mike Duggan

Sarah Cwiek talks about Mike Duggan's win in Detroit

It has been quite a journey for a candidate who got booted off the primary ballot, was going to fold his tent and walk away, then was urged to mount a write-in campaign, swept the primary and today, is the new Mayor-Elect of Detroit.

Mike Duggan has become Detroit's first white mayor in 40 years, beating Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek has covered the Duggan campaign and was at the victory party last night. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:15 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Michigan musician tells the story of his battle with leukemia

Stewart Francke
Twitter

An interview with musician Stewart Francke.

Whenever you talk about the key players in Michigan's music scene, one of the names that inevitably comes up is that of Stewart Francke.

Born in Saginaw, he's made his home, raised his family and built his music career in Metro Detroit.

Writer and critic Jim McFarlin calls Stewart Francke "Detroit's workingman's troubadour," a title he's earned and maintained over decades of making his music.

But today we are going to hear about another journey Stewart Francke has been on, a journey into the world of cancer. A journey that began when he was diagnosed with leukemia that forced Stew and his family and circle of friends to join together to wage a ferocious battle.

He's now telling the story of his cancer battle in his e-book from Untreed Reads. The title says it all, "What Don't Kill Me Just Makes Me Strong."

Stewart Francke joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:32 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Putting apples to sleep in Michigan

Apples from an orchard in Ottawa County.
dailyinvention Creative Commons

Yes, you heard that right.

See, last year was a true "annus horribilis" for apple crops - with that cold, wet spring and hot summer drought.

That led to a terrible apple harvest.

This year has brought an abundant supply, but that good news presents new challenges for Michigan growers.

Like how to store all that fruit before it goes to sale.

So, there's this technique: "lulling apples to sleep." 

*Listen to to the audio above.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

How yoga studios can impact the cultural landscape of a city

Practicing the warrior pose.
Tomas Sobek Flickr

Back in the 1990s, we began to see coffee shops pop up in cities all around Michigan — Starbucks, Caribou, Biggby.

Now, a similar trend is happening with yoga studios, here in Michigan and nationwide.

As the Washington Post’s Lyndsey Layton put it:

“To track the economic transformation of Washington, here's a simple rule: Follow the yoga mats.”

How do yoga studios change the cultural landscape of a city? Are these changes positive or are long-time residents being kept away from the table?

Read more
Stateside
4:31 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Rep. Kildee weighs in on proposed nuclear waste disposal facility on Lake Huron

Bruce Power Ontario Power Generation

Rebecca Williams of Michigan Radio's Environment Report first told you last year that Ontario Power Generation has proposed building a nuclear waste disposal facility at its Bruce Nuclear Power Site.

 The site near the city of Kincardine and would be located less than a mile from Lake Huron. If approved, the site would house 52 million gallons of low and intermediate level nuclear waste. Among those expressing alarm about this proposal are Congressman Sander Levin, Gary Peters, John Dingell, and my next guest, Congressman Dan Kildee, Democrat from Flint Township. *Listen to the audio above.

Environment & Science
4:31 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

MDNR official says he misspoke when talking about Michigan wolves

Al Warren

On yesterday's program, we spoke with MLive writer John Barnes about his series of stories this week on the upcoming managed-wolf hunt in the Upper Peninsula. The managed hunt is a first for Michigan.

 During the interview, John Barnes referred to a statement made by the MDNR's fur-bearer specialist, Adam Bump. In an interview last May with Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody, Bump told him about ways in which wolves were frightening residents of Ironwood, in the Upper Peninsula, but in speaking with John Barnes,Bump said he misspoke. Adam Bump joins us to explain just how that happened.

Stateside
4:30 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Royal Oak's Pete Wurdock has a new collection of short stories

Royal Oak writer Pete Wurdock has just published his fourth book. It's a collection of short stories, all of them set in Northern Michigan.

 The collection is entitled "Bending Water and Stories Nearby" and it's as interesting to hear what it took for Pete to get this stories written as it is to actually read these 14 stories. Pete Wurdock joined us in the studio. *Listen to the audio above. 

Stateside
4:30 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Where are the women in Michigan politics?

The chamber of Michigan's House of Representatives in Lansing. Leaders in the Michigan legislature and Governor Granholm are close to an agreement on the budget.
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

On this Election Day - Here's a question worth exploring: where are the women in Michigan politics?

The number of women in the State Legislature has now dropped to a 20 year low.  There are only four women serving in the Senate, and 24 in the House.

And that puts Michigan at 36th in the nation in terms of female State Senators and Representatives.

And when you look to Washington, the gender ratio in Congress isn't much better.

Barb Byrum joined us today. She’s the Ingham County Clerk, and she served in the State House of Representatives from 2007 to 2013.

Politics & Culture
3:26 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

On this Election Day 2013 we focus on women in politics - or, the lack-thereof.

The number of women in the Michigan Legislature is at a 20 year low.

We'll ask why and what the consequences might be, later in the show.

And yoga and gentrification. We'll explore what an increase in yoga studios in a city like Detroit can mean for long-time residents.

But first, plans by a Canadian power company to store nuclear waste underground right near Lake Huron have drawn the attention of some members of Michigan's Congressional delegation.

As we first told you on Stateside this past August, Ontario Power Generation has proposed building a nuclear waste disposal facility at its Bruce Nuclear Power Site. That's near the city of Kincardine, which is located less than a mile from Lake Huron.

If approved, the site would house 52 million gallons of low and intermediate level nuclear waste.

Those expressing alarm about this proposal are Congressman Sander Levin, Gary Peters, John Dingell, and my next guest, Congressman Dan Kildee, Democrat from Flint Township.

Politics & Culture
4:57 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Stateside for Monday, November 4th, 2013

Voters in Detroit go to the polls tomorrow, and no matter who gets elected to be that city's next Mayor, crime will be one of the problems they'll have to tackle. On today's show, we looked past the city's financial struggles to curbing the violence in Detroit.

 And, we found out about a "flipped school" - one of the first in the nation. Students watch lectures at night and do homework during the day in class.  And, a Grand Rapids park millage will take park funding out of the city's general fund. We spoke with one of the supports of the millage to find out why voters should consider it. Also, a Canadian photographer found beauty in the ruins of Detroit. He joined us to talk about his exhibit. 

First on the show, one of the most emotionally charged issues in Michigan in 2013 has been wolves.

After teetering on the brink of extinction, the gray wolf population has rebounded so much so that earlier this year, Governor Rick Snyder signed a law that allows a first-ever state wolf hunt in the Upper Peninsula.

That historic hunt begins November 15.

Forty-three wolves can be shot in three UP zones where officials say they have the most problems.

During the legislative debate on the wolf hunt, lawmakers from the UP spoke with passion about the "fear" their constituents had of the wolves, worrying for the safety of livestock, pets, even small children.

Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody spoke with the point man on wolves for the DNR. Adam Bump told Steve that wolves had become very accustomed to life in Ironwood.

"So you have wolves showing up in backyards, wolves showing up on porches, wolves staring at people through their sliding glass doors, while they're pounding on it, exhibiting no fear."

But an MLive investigation into the historic wolf hunt raises some serious questions about the debate, about claims made by opponents, and about the DNR's Bump.

John Barnes is reporting on this for MLive in a series called "Crying Wolf," and he joined us today.

Stateside
4:55 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Macomb County high school see success in 'flipped classroom' education strategy

TeachingWorks, a national organization based at U of M, aims to develop a nationwide system for all teaching programs, so that teachers are prepared the minute they walk into the classroom.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

There is a high school in Macomb County that has grabbed the attention of educators across the country.

Three years ago, Clintondale High School became the very first in the country to be a "flipped school."

Kids watch teachers' lectures at home as much as they want or need, and class time is when teachers are there to help with what we would otherwise call "homework."

One education expert says maybe online is controversial, but the flipped classroom is a new strategy nearly everyone agrees on. It can be a very good thing for students and teachers.

Read more
Stateside
4:55 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Questioning the claims made by Michigan's wolf hunt advocates

The federal government wants to turn management of gray wolves in the western Great Lakes over to the states.
USFWS

One of the most emotionally charged issues in Michigan in 2013 has been the wolf hunt.

After teetering on the brink of extinction, the gray wolf population has rebounded so much so that earlier this year, Governor Rick Snyder signed a law that allows a first-ever state wolf hunt in the Upper Peninsula.

That historic hunt begins November 15.

Forty-three wolves can be killed in three zones in Michigan's Upper Peninsula where officials say they have the most problems.

During the legislative debate on the wolf hunt, lawmakers from the U.P. spoke with passion about the "fear" their constituents had of the wolves, worrying for the safety of livestock, pets, even small children.

Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody spoke with the point man on wolves for the DNR. Adam Bump told Steve that wolves had become very accustomed to life in Ironwood.

"So you have wolves showing up in backyards, wolves showing up on porches, wolves staring at people through their sliding glass doors, while they're pounding on it, exhibiting no fear."

But an MLive investigation into the historic wolf hunt raises some serious questions about the debate, about claims made by opponents, and about the DNR's Bump.

John Barnes is reporting on this for MLive in a series called "Crying Wolf," and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:55 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Grand Rapids millage dedicates funding for parks

Douglas Park in Grand Rapids.
Facebook

Election day 2013 is a big day for those who want to see better parks in Grand Rapids.

A coalition is hoping to get voters to approve a dedicated millage for city parks.

The millage campaign has raised the conversation: just what do people want in their city? And how much are they willing to pay to have a good park system?

Steve Faber is the executive director of the Friends of Grand Rapids Parks and he's a member of "Neighbors for Parks, Pools and Playgrounds," the citizen advocacy group proposing this millage. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

What is driving the violence in Detroit and Flint?

Joy VanBuhler Flickr

Election Day 2013 is close at hand.

And that's when Detroit voters will decide whether their next Mayor will be Mike Duggan or Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

The winner of the election will inherit the huge challenge of what to do about the crime rate in Detroit.

At least 386 people were murdered in the city last year, and recent FBI statistics put Detroit neck and neck with Flint for the top spot of most violent cities in America.

The high crime rate means those folks who can are getting out of these cities, which makes the economic downward spiral even worse.

What can be done? And do we really know what is driving the violence in cities like Detroit and Flint?

Michigan State University sociologist Dr. Carl Taylor joined us today from East Lansing. His new book "Third City" looks at the challenges in post-industrial Detroit and Michigan. 

Listen to the full interview above.

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