Stateside

Stateside
4:52 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Canadian photographer finds art in Detroit's decaying buildings

A photo from Jarmin's Detroit exhibit.
Philip Jarmin Facebook

Anyone who has spent time driving around the city of Detroit has seen ruined buildings. They can be found just about everywhere within the city limits.

Among those decaying buildings can be found some of the finest examples of early 20th century architecture, the kinds of buildings that remind us that Detroit was once known as the “Paris of the Midwest.”

Canadian photographer Philip Jarmain first discovered these disintegrating beauties while he was a student at the University of Windsor. And ever since 2010, Philip Jarmain has been documenting these vanishing early 20th century buildings.

Twenty of his fine art prints were recently on exhibit at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco, with interest in these large format architectural photographs certainly fueled by the headlines surrounding Detroit’s bankruptcy filing.

The exhibit was called American Beauty: The Opulent Pre-Depression Architecture of Detroit.

Philip Jarmain joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:29 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, October 31st, 2013

Governor Snyder and Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr both took the stand this week at Detroit's bankruptcy eligibility hearings. That's as business leaders met in the city to discuss the future. We'll take a look at these two contrasting events later on today's show.

And, just how was Halloween celebrated decades and decades ago in Michigan? We'll find out.

Also, starting tomorrow, families who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, are going to have to tighten those proverbial belts even more.

That's because a temporary boost in the food stamp funding is expiring as of November 1, and that means SNAP recipients will see their benefits shrink.

Melissa Smith is a Senior Policy Analyst for the Michigan League for Public Policy.

Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
4:10 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Forecaster says get your snow shovels ready

If you are in a part of Michigan that gets lake effect snow, you might want to get your snow shovel out from the back of the garage.

 MLive Meteorologist Mark Torregrossa thinks we could be in for an early dose of lake effect snow.

Stateside
4:01 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

What business leaders have to say about Michigan's economy

Detroit skyline.
user: jodelli Flickr

This week, the Business Leaders for Michigan, the state’s most prominent business roundtable, met in Detroit.

The group offered an in-depth “report card” of how Michigan is recovering from the implosion suffered during the recession. They also outline what it’ll take to boost Michigan’s presence as a money-generating state.

We talked with Daniel Howes, a business columnist with the Detroit News, about Michigan's current business climate — and where things go from here.

Stateside
4:00 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Cuts to food stamps will reach low-income Michiganders this week

Michiganders who rely on food stamps to grocery shop will be impacted by cuts to the SNAP program.
Pneedham Flickr

  Starting this Friday, families who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are going to have to tighten their belts even moreA temporary boost in food stamp funding will expire on November 1, meaning SNAP recipients will see their benefits shrink.

What does that mean here in Michigan in terms of dollars and cents? Is the economy recovering enough in Michigan that people will be able to weather the loss in benefits?

Melissa Smith is a Senior Policy Analyst for the Michigan League for Public Policy. She talked with us about the impact of the food stamp cuts in the state.

Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
3:09 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

New MSU exhibit presents hundreds of Alan Lomax Michigan folksongs

Alan Lomax
Wikipedia

 Famed folklorist Alan Lomax prowled through Michigan on his legendary 10 year cross-country trip, collecting American folk music for the Library of Congress. In that collection is a lively reel by a fiddler named Patrick Bonner recorded on Beaver Island, Michigan in 1938.

Now, Alan Lomax’s hundreds of Michigan recordings are being presented in a traveling exhibition from Michigan State University. It’s called Michigan Folksong Legacy: Grand Discoveries from the Great Depression.

Read more
Stateside
10:15 am
Thu October 31, 2013

The history of Halloween in Michigan

Flickr user Terry.Tyson Flickr

 You drive around most neighborhoods these days and there is absolutely no doubt we love Halloween.

Once upon a time, you carved a pumpkin, popped in a candle and put it on your porch to greet trick or treaters.

Now, homes are decked out with giant webs and big spiders, ghouls and witches, and don't forget the lights. Halloween is now second only to Christmas for consumer spending.

Just when and where did this all begin? And how far back does Halloween go here in Michigan?

We turn to historian and contributor to the Detroit News Bill Loomis for the answers. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:22 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Michigan is home to five national parks and there are lots of open spaces where you can camp, hunt and enjoy nature. But, yesterday, an Oklahoma Senator recently said two Michigan landmarks are a prime example of wasteful federal spending. We found out what’s behind the senator’s reasoning and whether there is some truth to his concerns.

 Then, we took a look at a new proposal by a group of Democrats in the Michigan House that would require the state to determine the actual cost of educating a public school student in Michigan. That got us thinking, shouldn't we already know?  We also spoke with Michigan writer Donald Lystra about his new collection of short stories. And, Ann Arbor now has its own Death Café, organized by funeral home guide Merilynne Rush. She stopped by to tell us more about it. But, first on the show, ever since the government unveiled its healthcare.gov website, the headlines surrounding the Affordable Care Act have been about the problems with the way the site was designed and the extreme difficulty Americans have had in getting on the exchange. But what about the Americans that don't need healthcare.gov? The ones who already have plans? To those consumers, President Obama has been saying this since 2009:

“If you like your current insurance, you will keep your current insurance. No government takeover, nobody’s changing what you’ve got if you’re happy with it.”

So why, then, then are some 2 million Americans - about 140,000 in Michigan - getting cancelation letters from their insurers over the past couple of weeks?

Marianne Udow-Phillips directs the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation, a non-profit partnership between the University of Michigan and Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan. She joined us today.

Stateside
4:06 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Michigan author publishes new collection of short stories

Donald Lystra
Facebook

Short stories are in the spotlight in the literary world after Canadian writer Alice Munro recently won the 2013 Nobel Prize in literature. She's widely considered to be the "master of the short story."

The Michigan writer Donald Lystra is just out with his collection of short stories called "Something That Feels Like Truth."

Donald Lystra is an engineer who turned to writing later in life. His debut novel "Season of Water and Ice" won the Midwest Book Award and the Michigan Notable Book Award.

Donald Lystra joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
4:04 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Oklahoma senator points to two Michigan national parks as examples of 'wasteful' federal spending

Isle Royale nature trail.
Wikipedia

Two Michigan landmarks have been targeted by a Republican senator as prime examples of wasteful federal spending.

Each year, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Oklahoma) issues a report on what he feels are the most egregious examples of government waste.

This report points to Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior and Keweenaw National Historical Park in the UP as "wasteful" and not worthy of preservation.

Todd Spangler, Detroit Free Press Washington reporter joined us today to tell us what’s behind Sen. Coburn’s reasoning.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:31 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Why are millions of Americans losing health care coverage?

user mudowp Twitter

Ever since the government unveiled its healthcare.gov website, the headlines surrounding the Affordable Care Act have been about the problems with the way the site was designed and the extreme difficulty Americans have had in getting on the exchange to shop for health insurance.

But, what about the Americans that don't need healthcare.gov? The ones who already have plans? Some 14 million consumers buy their own insurance individually.

And to those consumers, President Obama has been saying this since 2009:

“If you like your current insurance, you will keep your current insurance. No government takeover, nobody’s changing what you’ve got if you’re happy with it.”

So why, then, are some 2 million Americans - about 140,000 in Michigan - getting cancelation letters from their insurers?

Marianne Udow-Phillips directs the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation, a non-profit partnership between the University of Michigan and Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:27 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Ann Arbor has its own Death Cafe

Merilynne Rush
LinkedIn

It's probably safe to say most of us shy away from thinking about and talking about death.

As medical science has developed the technology to keep us alive longer it seems we have become more and more squeamish about death itself, even though - you got to admit - it is the one thing in life that happens to each and every one of us.

There is a movement trying to change that: the Death Café. Merilynne Rush is a home funeral guide, and she has brought the Death Café to Ann Arbor.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:25 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

How much does it cost to educate a student in Michigan public schools?

Last month, the Michigan House Democrats School Reform Task Force unveiled a new proposal that would require the State Department of Education to determine the actual cost of educating a public school student in Michigan.

That got us wondering: do we really not know how much it costs to educate a student in our state? And if so, why not?

Michael Addonizio is a professor of education at Wayne State University, and he joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:12 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Want to learn Ojibwe? There's an app for that

Ever wanted to learn Ojibwe? Well, there’s an app for that.

The Ojibwe, also known as Anishinaabe people, make up one of the largest groups of Native Americans in the United States, with many living here in Michigan.

Darrick Baxter, president of Ogoki Learning Systems, helped design this free app that could go a long way towards keeping the Ojibwe language alive. 

Here's a video showing how the app works:

Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
4:10 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Did the government shutdown hurt Michigan Republicans?

The U.S. Capitol.
user kulshrax Flickr

Now that the 16-day government shutdown has been solved — at least for the time being — analysts are trying to assess the political cost of the standoff between the White House and congressional Democrats versus Republicans, who attempted to derail funding for the Affordable Care Act as a condition for funding the rest of the government.

As the standoff dragged on, the country slid towards a fiscal default, Americans aimed their fury at Congress. And though polls show many expressed anger at all parties in the standoff — from the President to, essentially, everyone in the House and Senate — the brunt of citizen anger appeared aimed at Republicans.

Read more
Politics & Culture
4:06 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

It appears the political buzz and chattering class have moved away from the government shutdown and the debate over the debt-ceiling to problems with the Affordable Care Act's website and allegations of NSA spying on U.S. allies.

But political operatives and campaign managers haven't moved on. They're continuing to focus on the shutdown, and how to make it work for them - for their campaigns - come 2014.On today's show we look at how Republicans in Michigan's Congressional delegation could feel the impact from a disastrous few weeks in D.C.And, then, trying to keep a language alive? There's an app for that. We talk to a man who's helped to design an app that will teach you Ojibwe - the language of some Ojibway living in Michigan.But first on the show we look at Flint's new Master Plan. It's the first one in more than 50 years.Last night, the Flint city council approved the plan, which calls for stabilizing neighborhoods hard hit by blight and creating new opportunity for business investment.Scott Kincaid is the President of the Flint City Council, and he likes it.

Read more
Stateside
4:01 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Father-daughter duo embark on new adventure — starting a band

Emily and San Slomovits
Arbor Web Arbor Web

An interview with San and Emily Slomovits.

Traditional wisdom has it that kids aren’t especially into their parents’ music.

But that’s not the case for Sandor and Emily Slomovits of Ann Arbor. Just this year Emily released an album with her father San, “Innocent When You Dream.”

The daughter-dad duo has been making the rounds, sharing the stage at venues like The Ark in Ann Arbor.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:00 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

The surprising history of the restaurant menu

A table at a restaurant.
user Biodun themedicalhealthplus.com

The surprising history of the restaurant menu

We've started noticing something when we've been going out to eat.

These days, instead of handing out a menu in the traditional plastic-coated paper, some restaurants are handing us iPads.

Chili's Grill and Bar has been testing tablets that allow diners to order their drinks, desserts and pay the bill without having to flag down a waiter. It's been so successful in the 180 or so test restaurants that the company plans to install tablet menus at most of its 1,266 restaurants in the United States.

In Ann Arbor, the Real Seafood Company recently began using tablet menus.

And that got us wondering about menus and going out to eat. What does the way a society eats at restaurants say about us?

Listen to full interview above.

Stateside
3:58 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Will this new plan help Flint grow?

Flint's skyline.
Flint Michigan Facebook.com

On Monday, the Flint City Council approved a new master plan — the first new plan in more than 50 years.

The plan calls for stabilizing neighborhoods hit hard by blight, and creating new opportunities for business investment.

City officials and residents have spent the last two years coming up with the plan. Flint, about 50 miles northwest of Detroit, has been under state oversight since 2011. The city currently is dealing with $3 million in structural debt.

Will this new plan help Flint grow?

Listen to full story above.

Politics & Culture
5:11 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Stateside for Monday, October 28th, 2013

Prescription-free emergency contraception is supposed to be available over-the-counter, across the country, for women of all ages.

But, for some, where you live matters. On today's show we found out about the uneven access to Plan B in Native American communities.

And the Yankee Air Museum has been given more time as it tries to save part of an historic factory. Will the Willow Run bomber plant be saved?

And we met a woman using graffiti in a very unique way.

Have you heard “The Michigan Poem?” We spoke to the Kalamazoo performance duo who wrote it.

Also, we took a look at child passenger safety laws and how to keep kids safe during car rides.

First on the show, we turned to Detroit's Mayoral election. Voters in Michigan's largest city will head to the polls one week from tomorrow.

Within that race for Mayor  is the issue of race. There is a white candidate: Mike Duggan - former Detroit Medical Center CEO, and a black candidate: Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

As part of the Detroit Free Press' endorsement of a Mayoral candidate, our next guest penned yesterday's column in the Freep about the complex role that race is playing in this election.

Stephen Henderson is the Editorial Page Editor for the Detroit Free Press, and he joined us today.

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