Stateside

Stateside
5:43 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Warming climate leading to heavier rains in region

Rain is in the forecast for much of Michigan.
Tom Grundy Flickr

This past summer brought us challenging days in terms of heavy rain, thunderstorms, and sewers unable to handle the fast and furious downpours.

And that is giving scientists cause for concern.

Dr Larissa Larsen is an associate professor in the Urban and Regional Planning Program at the University of Michigan and she joined us in the studio.

Listen to the audio above.

Politics & Culture
5:29 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

What if you could build a school from the ground-up? What would it look like? How would it feel? Just what would it be?

On today's show, we talk to a man who's re-imagining what early childhood could look like in Michigan.

And then, the state has signed a deal to lease Belle Isle from Detroit. The island soon becoming Michigan's 102nd state park, but there is plenty of unhappiness in Detroit about the decision. We'll find out why later in the hour.

But first, it's Day Three of the government shutdown. There was an Obama-Biden-Boehner-Pelosi-Reid-McConnell meeting at the White House late Tuesday that yielded nothing that we know of in terms of solving the impasse.

Meantime, Americans continue to express their anger at all sides involved in this stalemate.

We wanted to get some historical perspective and context to all of this. Has America weathered standoffs like this in the past? What can history teach us about the divisions we see now between the President, the House and Senate, Democrats and Republicans -- especially the far-right Republicans.

Is finding common ground possible in Washington in 2013?

For that, he turned to our favorite political-historian -- Gleaves Whitney directs the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University.

Stateside
1:46 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

How much solar energy does it take to cross Australia?

U-M's solar car.
umich.edu umich.edu

Cars running on solar energy might not be in every driveway in the country, but a group of students at the University of Michigan are helping keep the solar power dream alive.

The university’s solar car team, one of the most decorated teams of its kind in North America, is in Australia now, preparing to compete in the World Solar Challenge on Sunday. They’ll be shooting for the fastest time on an 1800-mile race from the top of the continent to the bottom. Teams from across the globe will be using nothing but the sun and a jet-like roadster to get them across the outback.

Read more
Stateside
5:34 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

The government shutdown from the perspective of a former Congressman

Joe Schwarz
Wikipedia

It's day two of the government shutdown.

Joe Schwarz is a former Republican Congressman from southern mid-Michigan. He has been out of office now for about 7 years. He joined us today to give us his perspective on the issue from the outside.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:34 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Congressman Gary Peters on the government shutdown

Gary Peters

It’s day two of the government shutdown.

Democratic Congressman Gary Peters joined us today. He represents Michigan's 14th Congressional district. He’s here to help those of us who are not on the ground in D.C. understand where things stand right now.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:31 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

What can be done about Michigan's overcrowded jails?

California inmates will be housed in a Baldwin prison beginning in 2011
Flickr user Still Burning Creative Commons

When the public hears that a prisoner has been sentenced to serve time in jail, most of us allow ourselves to think that the guilty party will do the time.

But what happens when the number of prisoners who are sentenced outstrips the capacity of that jail? Do you cram in more and more inmates? Relieve overcrowding through early release? Reduce bonds? And what are the repercussions of each of those approaches?

Daniel Manville is an Associate Clinical Professor of Law and the Director of the Civil Rights Clinic at Michigan State University. He joined us today to discuss the issue.

Read more
Stateside
5:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Scrap metal theft is a huge problem for some cities in Michigan

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Imagine this: you go to open the doors of your church one bright morning and realize something is missing, something big. The statue of the crucified Christ has been stripped right off the outside wall.

Or you're driving along a street and you have to navigate your way around big open holes in the street because the manhole covers have been stolen.

Or how about this: the catalytic converter is stripped right out from under the hood of your parked car.

Welcome to the world of scrap-metal theft in Michigan cities.

Nancy Derringer reported on the problem for Bridge Magazine and she joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:20 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

Some thirty years after the County Jail Overcrowding Act was passed, Michigan is still dealing with overcrowding emergencies in jails across the state. On today's show: How do we fix the problem of jails filled to the brim? Do we reduce bonds? Increase rates of early release?

And, when it comes to scrap metal theft, anything goes, from manhole covers to copper Jesus statues. What can Michigan lawmakers do to crack down on these thefts?

Also, Michigan writer Natalie Burg joined us to talk about her new book. It's a memoir of her experience living on a Swedish farm.

First on the show, it’s day two of the government shutdown.

Democratic Congressman Gary Peters joined us today. He represents Michigan's 14th Congressional district. 

And former Congressman Joe Schwarz joined us to give us his perspective on the issue as well.

Politics & Culture
4:55 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

It's October 1st. The beginning of the new state and new federal fiscal years have come in with a bang. The news making headlines across the country: the partial government shutdown. The first federal shutdown in 17 years.

Democrats and Republicans in Washington D.C. were unable to compromise on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.

But, what does this mean for you here in Michigan?

Well, 41% of Michigan's budget comes from the federal government, but a shutdown doesn't mean all of that money will stop flowing immediately - though, it will slow.

Read more
Education
4:49 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Impacts of new school consolidation law felt in northern Michigan

An empty classroom.
Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

A record number of Michigan schools are struggling to stay in the black.

So far, the headlines have focused on the fiscal problems of some of the state’s more populated counties.

A new state law allows state officials to dissolve and consolidate small schools with big problems.

Read more
Stateside
4:45 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

How will the partial government shut down affect Michigan?

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, or "Super Committee," failed to come up with a compromise to reduce the deficit. Michigan members of the Super Committee spoke about the experience.
U.S. Congress congress.gov

We are just hours away from what appears likely to be a partial government shutdown.

The U.S. Senate, controlled by Democrats, and the Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives, have been unable to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.  If no agreement is reached today, which appears likely, the government begins shutting down at midnight.

David Shepardson, Washington D.C. based reporter for the Detroit News, joined us today from Washington.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:36 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Employers should be careful about what they see on social media

Flickr user rutty Flickr

Ever since the rise of Facebook we’ve heard the warning: be careful about what you put on Facebook, watch what you post online. What if a prospective employer checks out your Facebook page and sees something that tanks you for that new job?

But, in his recent article in Crain’s Detroit Business, writer Chris Gautz tells us it’s the employer who needs to tread lightly and carefully in looking at social media, or the online presence of potential hires, and he warns companies to be careful in taking action against employees for their Facebook or Twitter postings.

Chris Gautz joined us today to tell us more.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:31 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Livingston County is getting a pinball museum

Flickr user Needle Flickr

Clay Harrell has made saving pinball machines from the scrap heap his mission.

He has been collecting, repairing, and restoring pinball machines -- rescuing unwanted old machines and bringing them back to their former glory.

Now he’s moving his formidable pinball collection into a vacant VFW Hall in Green Oak Township in Livingston County. There he plans to create a private museum of pinball machines.

Clay Harrell joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:21 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Stateside for Monday, September 30th, 2013

Special Education students and their families in Michigan are about one month into the new school year and they're feeling the impact of the federal sequester cuts. Today, we looked at the cuts to special ed funding and find out what it means to schools and students.

 

And, a look at social media etiquette and your job--what's allowed and what's not.

And, one Detroit musician, and AP reporter, talks about his family's deep roots in Motown.

Also, we spoke with one man who has made it his mission to save pinball machines from the scrap yard. He plans to open up a private pinball museum.

First on the show, we are just hours away from what appears likely to be a partial government shutdown.

The U.S. Senate, controlled by Democrats and the Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives, have been unable to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution to fund the federal government.  If no agreement is reached today, which appears likely, the government begins shutting down at midnight.

David Shepardson, Washington D.C. based reporter for the Detroit News, joined us today from Washington.

Stateside
4:12 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Sequester cuts by Congress have hit special education students in Michigan

user BES Photos Flickr

The start of the new school year has brought unpleasant and unwelcome surprises for the parents of Michigan children with special needs.

That's because the federal sequester has hit special education, in the words of our next guest, "like a ton of bricks."

A new round of special ed cuts were forced by a 5% reduction in federal funding of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and now parents and special education students are seeing what that means.

With some 6.5 million disabled children from ages 3 to 21 getting services funded by the IDEA, this is something being felt across the country.

Marcie Lipsitt is the co-chair of the Michigan Alliance for Special Education. As the mother of a son with special needs, she has been a state and national advocate for disabled children. She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:38 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

AP reporter becomes a singer-songwriter-musician in his off hours

Jeff Karoub
Twitter

His name is Jeff Karoub. You've heard him here on Stateside in his role as an Associated Press reporter covering the Detroit area.

But today, we met a "different" Jeff Karoub. We met the singer-songwriter-musician who has just won a grant from the Knight Foundation for a project he calls "Coming Home To Music."

Jeff Karoub joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
9:13 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Electronic musician inspired by family & place

"If I couldn't make music, I would not be a happy person."
Shigeto/Facebook

Michigan has a history of some pretty sweet music. One surprising genre that is Pure Michigan is techno. The art form was invented by three young men from Belleville in the 1980s (specifically Kevin Saunderson, Derrick May, and Juan Atkins, aka the Belleville 3, and you can listen to some classic Detroit techno here).

Read more
Stateside
4:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Federal judges send letter to Congress outlining problems with sequestration

Detroit Legal News

Many of us have not noticed the sequestration cuts by Congress, but they’re being felt within the federal court system. Eighty-seven judges have signed a letter outlining the problems caused by the cuts and they’ve sent it to Congress.

One of those judges is the Chief Judge for the United States District Court of the Eastern District of Michigan.

We spoke with him today about how the cuts are being felt. Listen to our conversation with him above.

Stateside
4:37 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Messing with the plans to merge Chrysler and Fiat

The U.S. government is no longer invested in Chrysler.
Ricardo Giaviti Flickr

Without a doubt, the automakers of Detroit are healthier, but in the midst of better cars and trucks and much better sales is some machinations with Chrysler.

When Fiat, led by Sergio Marchionne, allied itself with Chrysler, it seemed to solve problems for both companies. But Marchionne has a rocky relationship with Chrysler workers represented by the United Auto Workers.

Now, Chrysler’s retiree health care trust is offering $100 million worth of shares in filing for an initial public offering in the U.S. They want to take Chrysler public. That really messes with Marchionne’s plans to merge Chrysler and Fiat.

Detroit News columnist Daniel Howse wrote about that today and joined us today.

Stateside
4:35 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Feds coming to Detroit to help the city take advantage of grant dollars

Detroit.
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

White House officials are meeting with Detroit and Michigan officials tomorrow and the feds are expected to bring some money.

It’s not being called a Detroit bailout, but it is expected to include federal and private funds to help Detroit demolish abandoned buildings, support police and some transportation projects.

The Detroit Free Press has been reporting on efforts to leverage as much federal help as possible. Todd Spangler with the Freep joined us today.

One of the problems Detroit has had is getting grants -- not keeping within the requirements of the grant and having to send money back to Washington. Part of the meeting tomorrow at Wayne State University is to help Detroit handle the grant money better and to take advantage of other money that might be available to help- without crossing that line of being a bailout. 

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