WUOMFM

Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Stateside 7.31.2017

Jul 31, 2017

Today, we hear about the new breast pump that allows moms to "keep on keepin' on" at work, in the car, or while cooking. And, usually people are "called out" for mental illness. We hear from two Michigan poets taking a national tour to "call people in."

Stateside 7.28.2017

Jul 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why the James & Grace Lee Boggs School doesn't shy away from teaching kids about the 1967 rebellion in Detroit. And, we learn why one scientist says academics shouldn't be afraid to "get political." 

Stateside 7.27.2017

Jul 27, 2017

Today, we hear Detroit cast members explain why they hope the new film will spark conversations about race relations. And, nuns recall their role in the 1967 rebellion. They also talk about the injustices still troubling the city today.

Stateside 7.26.2017

Jul 26, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how out-of-touch city leaders energized black pastors to redouble their activism efforts after the 1967 rebellion. And, we learn why cities struggling with unpaid water bills could learn from Philadelphia's new approach.

Stateside 7.25.2017

Jul 26, 2017

Today, we speak with a Great Lakes lawmaker who's tired of waiting for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' overdue study on Asian carp. And, we learn about "After/Life," a play that brings forth women's voices from Detroit's 1967 rebellion.

Stateside 7.24.2017

Jul 24, 2017

Today on Stateside, Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team explains where things stand in the race for governor in Michigan. And, two brothers relive Detroit's 1967 rebellion, which they say helped create a "permanent underclass."

Stateside 7.21.2017

Jul 21, 2017

 

Today on Stateside, a Republican announces his campaign for governor. Plus, we talk with the author of a book that covers 300 years of black history in Detroit, including more than one civil disturbance. 

Stateside 7.20.2017

Jul 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, how the Detroit Free Press owners unveiled a new online look for the paper and outraged its customers. Then, what history teaches us about the tension between Detroit's white police force and its African American citizens.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.19.2017

Jul 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get to know the family at the center of the 1967 unrest in Detroit. And, we take a stroll with the Anishinaabe water walkers as they trek from Minnesota to Quebec to honor and protect the Great Lakes.

Stateside 7.17.2017

Jul 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn how a secretive development could force drastic change on small-town Durand. And, a historian explains how the divide between "White Detroit" and "Black Detroit" led to the city's 1967 rebellion.

Stateside 7.18.2017

Jul 18, 2017

Today, we hear what it was like to be a young, black police officer in Detroit during the 1967 rebellion. We also learn how a Detroit native and former Canadian Football League player ended up in a Chinese jail.

Stateside 7.14.17

Jul 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we talk to a woman who got job training to get into the workforce and ran into another hurdle. Also, in light of the discontent of the working class some conservatives are thinking maybe unions make sense, if they could be tweaked. Plus, we visit with our latest “Artisan of Michigan.”

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.13.2017

Jul 13, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get to know a low-income family that scrapes by on government assistance and odd jobs. And, we hear how this weekend's festival on Belle Isle aims to create community connections through wind, wind crafts, and string.

Stateside 7.12.2017

Jul 12, 2017

Today on Stateside, we answer listener Olivia Cushway's question: "How did Pere Cheney become a ghost town?" And, we hear why there are fewer and fewer avenues to the middle class for low-income families.

Stateside 7.11.2017

Jul 11, 2017

Today, we hear why the state's largest hospital system would prefer to repair the Affordable Care Act, not start from scratch. And, we learn why the Selfridge Air National Guard Base aims to become a home for the new F-35 fighter jet.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.10.2017

Jul 10, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why some alleged victims are furious over former doctor Larry Nassar's plea deal. We also hear why one political consultant thinks the Democratic Party's messaging is still failing to convince voters. And, we learn why Michigan trees are migrating. (Note: It's not all due to climate change).

Stateside 7.7.2017

Jul 7, 2017

  

Today on Stateside, the Genesee County treasurer won't foreclose on homes with unpaid water bills because the "water was poison." And, we hear how treatment and understanding of PTSD are evolving. 

Stateside 7.6.2017

Jul 6, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Wayne County may have a national model for prosecuting crimes against the LGBTQ community. And, we learn about a bipartisan effort to take redistricting out of politicians' hands.

Stateside 7.5.2017

Jul 5, 2017

Today on Stateside, we explore what it means to be black and Muslim in Michigan. We also hear new music from groups in West Michigan, and we learn about the ghost town often called "Michigan's Pompeii."

Stateside 7.3.2017

Jul 3, 2017

Today, Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team breaks down the latest in state politics, including Secretary of State Ruth Johnson's announcement that Michigan will largely comply with the Trump administration's request for very specific voter data. And, we hear how success started with failure in school for a child of proud Haitian parents. He's now head of design for Fiat Chrysler.

Stateside 6.30.2017

Jun 30, 2017

Today on Stateside, we rebroadcast some of our best Friday stories, and we hear about the blight and illegal dumping happening in some Detroit neighborhoods.

Stateside 6.29.2017

Jun 29, 2017

Today, the state sues the city of Flint to force it to accept its own mayor's plan to stay with water from Detroit. Then, the village president of Kalkaska is not backing down from his controversial anti-Muslim Facebook posts. We talk with him and a critic from the group Redneck Revolt.

Stateside 6.28.2017

Jun 28, 2017

Today, in our latest edition of Songs from Studio East, we meet John Holk & the Sequins, a honky tonk-inspired, psychedelic-country pop band. And, we learn how proposed federal and state cuts would be a one-two punch for Michigan environmental programs.

Stateside 6.27.2017

Jun 27, 2017

Today, we hear from a domestic abuse survivor who's fighting to keep her ex-husband behind bars as his parole date approaches. Also, as the Education Achievement Authority dies this week, we discuss what the state's experiment in running a school district has taught us.

Stateside 6.26.2017

Jun 26, 2017

Today on Stateside, an expert explains why vigilance, not panic, is what's needed after a live Asian carp was found near Lake Michigan. And, we hear how a group of veterans on bikes plans to be "extra eyes" in Detroit neighborhoods.

Stateside 6.23.2017

Jun 23, 2017

Today, we talk with a Federal Reserve bank president about why he’s holding town halls to hear from people about the economy. Plus, we find out more about that canceled risk analysis on Enbridge Energy’s Line 5.

Today, we hear from someone working to develop industry standards in the "Wild West" of autonomous cars. And, we take an audio tour of the University of Michigan's driverless shuttles debuting this fall.

Stateside 6.21.2017

Jun 21, 2017

Today, Senator Debbie Stabenow explains why people deserve to know what's in the secret Senate bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. And, we speak with authors of a new book that shows there's more Up North than cherries and sand dunes.

Stateside 6.20.2017

Jun 20, 2017

It's World Refugee Day and today we revisit a Syrian refugee family we met just about a year ago, when they first arrived in Michigan. We hear how they've found some stability in their new home. Also today, we learn what the upcoming vote to replace the Affordable Care Act could mean for the small business community.

Stateside 6.19.2017

Jun 19, 2017

Today, we hear why the state has "a lot to prove" to win convictions for the involuntary manslaughter charges in relation to the Flint water crisis and why changes to our country's Cuba policy could affect Michigan's huge black bean industry. We also hear a young mom sing a lullaby she wrote for her son.

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