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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Stateside 7.14.2016

Jul 14, 2016

Today, we talk with a man as he walks to the Republican National Convention. He's looking for the Midwestern political voice. And, we hear how animal waste from factory farms is contaminating Lake Erie.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.13.2016

Jul 13, 2016

Today, we talk with a Vietnam vet from Ypsilanti who will receive the Medal of Honor on Monday. And, a Syrian refugee family shares their memories of home.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.12.2016

Jul 12, 2016

Today, we learn about how educational opportunity can improve the lives of inmates. And, we look at the history of bathrooms in America.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

A student inmate reads in class
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

For a convicted felon, getting a shot at an education might begin in prison.

Typically that means job training or a GED.

But a new program offers something more often associated with quiet campuses and ivy-covered walls.

The Calvin Prison Initiative is bringing the liberal arts and theology to inmates at a west Michigan prison.

Stateside 7.11.2016

Jul 11, 2016

Today, on our Next Idea series, we discuss public spaces and how, if used creatively, they could make more Detroiters feel like they belong in their own city. And, we talk about what to do if you're pulled over with a concealed weapon in Michigan.

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:

Left: SUZANNA SHKRELI FOR CONGRESS/FACEBOOK Right: mikebishop.house.gov / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This week the Democratic party chose a candidate for the 8th Congressional District. 

29-year-old Suzanna Shkreli is seeking to replace actor Melissa Gilbert, who has unofficially withdrawn for health reasons.

Shkreli has never held political office. She's an assistant prosecutor in Macomb County.

 A mural by Louis Delsarte at the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic site.
Flickr user yooperann/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

This week, violence and race have hit us in a way many of us have never seen.

Violence and race, though, are not new. The Detroit Journalism Cooperative has been looking at the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Some of the core issues then are some of the issues we're still struggling with today.

You've got to understand the history to really understand what's happened this week.

Flickr user TS Elliott/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Race is very difficult for people to talk about.

Many white people want to believe we’re in a post-racial society. After all, we have an African-American president.

Many black people note the inequalities that exist, the segregation that exists.

How can Americans begin to have a real discussion about race when we’ve been comfortable in our own beliefs about that subject for so long?

John Dingell, 29, is sworn in as a member of Congress in 1955 by House Speaker Sam Rayburn of Texas
John Dingell website

When he retired, John Dingell was the longest-serving congressman in U.S. history.

He was sworn in on Dec. 13, 1955 which began a long career that lasted through 11 presidencies until the Democrat retired at the end of 2014. In retirement, he's not showing any signs of slowing down as he took some time from "celebrating the hell" out of his 90th birthday to join Lester Graham on Stateside.

An Occupy Wall Street protester records police in 2011.
flickr user Paul Stein / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We likely would not know about the killings of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge or Philando Castile in Minnesota if not for the video recordings. 

In April, MLive published a story that dives into the question of whether police can order you to delete a recording on your phone after you've captured video of a police action.

The story refers to a case in which two of the officers who are accused of beating and falsely arresting the wrong person were undercover. A uniformed officer told people who'd recorded the scene to "delete it for the safety of the officers."

ACLU of Michigan Legal Director Michael Steinberg joined us today to talk generally about whether or not police can order you to delete a recording or seize your phone or camera. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Bourbon Fruit Smash

1-2 slices ginger (optional)
Fruit (8-10 blueberries, 2-3 strawberries, 4 peach slices, etc)
3-5 leaves mint or other fresh herb
2 oz Bourbon
1/2 oz lemon juice, or to taste
1/2 oz simple syrup, or to taste

Muddle ginger well (if using), then add fruit and herbs and muddle again. Combine remaining ingredients in shaker with ice. Shake, strain into ice filled old-fashioned glass.

Left courtesy of michigan.gov/Right courtesty of Michigan Attorney General's office

This week, State Attorney General Bill Schuette announced that if Governor Snyder wants to appeal a court decision regarding teacher pay, he'll have to hire his own attorney.

The AG is sitting this one out.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us today to discuss the ever-widening split between Michigan's two top Republicans. 

Michigan roads
User nirbhao / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

While many of us were getting ready for the holiday weekend last Friday afternoon, Governor Snyder announced his veto of a road funding bill that would have given some relief to 45 large cities.

Senate Bill 557 was sponsored by Republican Senator Marty Knollenberg of Troy. It was unanimously approved by the House and Senate, a feat remarkable in and of itself.

It would have repealed a requirement that larger cities pay for part of the state's cost for highway construction projects within their border.

Yet, the governor hauled out his veto power to whack the road bill.

U of M and MSU will face off on Oct. 29
FLICKER USR MARK DELL https://flic.kr/p/8HGMDv

What's that sound you hear?

It might be Wolverine fans chortling and Spartan fans growling as ESPN unveils its Future Power Rankings for college football. 

Every year, the network peers into the future to try to predict which college football programs are going to thrive and succeed.

This year, ESPN ranks U of M fifth, while Michigan State takes 10th place. 

According to Waller, opiate addiction is a chronic neurological disorder.
FLICKER USER KEVINKARNSFAMILY https://flic.kr/p/PyK3i

"Minding Michigan" is Stateside's ongoing series that examines mental health issues in our state. 

In 2014, Michigan became the first state to create a set of detailed guidelines for treating people addicted to heroin and other opioid drugs. 

The guidelines were praised by many in the treatment community as being clear, understandable and taking addiction treatment in Michigan to the next level.

Dr. Corey Waller is the doctor who wrote those guidelines. 

Courtesy of Save the Flags

When the Civil War broke out in April 1861, Michigan was one of the states to quickly answer the call for volunteers. 

In fact, when the 1st Michigan Infantry marched into Washington that May, Abraham Lincoln reportedly exclaimed, "Thank God for Michigan!"

This coming Saturday, July 9, we're all invited to the State Capitol to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the return of the Civil War Volunteers and their battle flags, as well as the 25th anniversary of Save The Flags, the effort to preserve and display battle flags carried by Michigan troops in the Civil War.

Photo courtesy of Sean Ahlquist, University of Michigan

The Next Idea

For a child on the autism spectrum, there can be challenges to learning and engaging with the world.

Our latest contributors to The Next Idea are Sean Ahlquist and Leah Ketcheson. They're on a team from the University of Michigan that's developing exciting new technologies to help autistic children tackle those challenges.

The "button wall" at the University of Chicago's 2008 Humanities Day
flickr user Quinn Dombrowski / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Early last year we announced on Stateside the Michigan Humanities Council's pick for the 2015-2016 Great Michigan Read: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel.

Mandel sat down with us in February 2015 to talk about her fantastic futuristic novel set in post-apocalyptic Michigan. 

Shelly Kasprzycki is the executive director of the Michigan Humanities Council. Of books chosen for the Great Michigan Read so far, she told us Station Eleven is "probably the all-time hit."

There is a growing trend of hackers using stolen data to blackmail companies and individuals.
hackNY.org / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

We hear so much about data breaches and hacked passwords, but what is it really all about? What does an attacker do with your passwords, credit card information and other hacked data?

Painting of Louis Pasteur working in his lab, 1885
Albert Edelfelt / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 / Public Domain

Many of us are following the headlines about the Zika virus with mounting alarm.

Before that, it was Ebola. Think back to October 2014, when a New Jersey nurse was quarantined after returning home from caring for Ebola patients in West Africa.

She later sued the state, by the way.

That same month, a Liberian man named Thomas Duncan left his home to visit Dallas, Texas. He left Liberia healthy. Two weeks later he was dead of Ebola, the first person diagnosed with the deadly disease in the U.S.

In 1885 people were equally terrified of rabies.

The current detection rate of chronic wasting disease is low, but Chad Stewart warned that the disease could decimate Michigan's deer population if left unchecked.
flickr user Rachel Kramer / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease that affects deer.

The State Department of Natural Resources is concerned about the spread of CWD through Michigan's deer population. 

Dorothy Aldridge and Sylvia Morgan in front of an exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum​ in Memphis​ showcasing Detroit activist Viola Liuzzo, who was murdered by the Ku Klux Klan while driving black voting rights activists between Selma and Montgom
Eric L. Hood

How do you get students to really appreciate history?

One powerful way is to get those students out of the classroom and take them to historic sites, bringing that history off the page and making it real.

That's the idea behind the Freedom Tour. 

It's Just Politics Logo
It's Just Politics with Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta

Attorney General Bill Schuette has announced that if Governor Snyder wants to appeal a court decision over teacher pay, he's on his own.

Many in Michigan are viewing the announcement as a sign that the relationship between the AG and the governor, once icy, has now all but frozen over.

Pictured Rocks is struggling to adjust to housing and economic changes caused by a surge in tourism.
Jodi Grove / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCL0

 

Pictured Rocks is the main tourist attraction in Munising, Michigan. But a surge in tourism has created challenges for the Munising community.

Some 723,000 tourists appeared last year alone, and the area is struggling to accommodate so many people while maintaining its quality of life.

Munising Mayor Rod DesJardins joined us to talk about how tourism has changed life in the communities near Pictured Rocks.

Detroit's new Red Wings arena under construction.
Rick Briggs / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

A petition drive to get a proposed Detroit city ordinance on the ballot has hit opposition. The ordinance would require that new, large developments that use public money or land return some benefits to the local community. Benefits could include things such as employment preference for neighborhood residents, or health and safety measures.

According to the International Dyslexia Association, as much as 20% of Americans have some symptoms of dyslexia.
pixabay user picjumbo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

By the time they leave kindergarten, kids are supposed to have learned the building blocks of literacy. 

They should be able to connect letters to sounds and spell simple words like "cat" and "book."

But for an estimated one in five children with dyslexia, those basic skills aren't so easy to master.

Shannon Gibney says thanks to adoptee activism, awareness of the challenges of transracial adoptions has changed since she was adopted as a child.
Elizabeth Dahl

Writer Shannon Gibney tackles some very sensitive and emotional subjects in her new young adult novel See No Color.

First, she speaks to us with the voice of a teenage girl, and that alone can present a merry-go-round of turbulent emotions.

Next, that teen, named Alexandra Kirtridge, is an adoptee. And layered over all of that is the fact that Alex is biracial, adopted by white parents as a very young child. 

Flickr user RAY TYLER IMAGES/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

While personnel are still in the military, the doctors they see understand their experiences in combat, or in other situations, might mean they have certain healthcare issues.

Once veterans are out of the military, though, their private physicians might not even think to ask if they’ve served. That’s an oversight one doctor is working to correct.

Flickr user pcurtner/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

For most of Michigan, this has been one of the driest starts to summer we’ve seen in a long time.

With Fourth of July coming up, there are concerns about fires in these dry conditions.

For this reason, Julie Secontine, the State Fire Marshal, has been considering banning fireworks this Fourth of July.

Jacobs said Legislature was "penny wise and pound foolish" in neglecting to add $3 million to the "heat and eat" program in the new state budget.
Flickr user Liz West / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

An advocacy group for low-income people has been going over the new state budget. The Michigan League for Public Policy (MLPP) found some good things in the budget, and a whole lot of federal money left on the table.

Gilda Jacobs, president and CEO of the MLPP, started with the good things:

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