WUOMFM

Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Today on Stateside, we discuss whether people will revolt when artificial intelligence comes for white-collar jobs. We also get an update on the Hepatitis A outbreak continuing in southeast Michigan, and we learn what to do if you're sexually harassed at work. 

Today on Stateside, we hear why Michigan could soon be the only state to not mandate financial disclosures from lawmakers. And, we discuss whether the Democratic Party is taking black voters for granted.

Today on Stateside, we hear from an opponent of the recreational marijuana ballot proposal, and we discuss former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar's sentence to 60 years in federal prison. We also talk about whether "passive homes" are the future, and how dog sledding joined the pack of popular winter sports in Michigan.

Who might run to replace U.S. Rep. John Conyers in Congress? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, we discuss a survey that shows sexism and sexual harassment persist throughout the auto industry. We also hear why soccer analyst Alexi Lalas doesn't see Detroit winning the bid for an MLS team – or at least, not yet.

In the second edition of UN/DIVIDED, a three-part series from Michigan Radio, we learn why school choice led to school closures in Albion. We also discuss Rep. John Conyers' resignation from Congress.

Today on Stateside, the Lansing State Journal's executive editor explains the front-page editorial that calls on Lou Anna Simon, president of Michigan State University, to resign over her handling of sexual assault and harassment problems. And, the former vice chairman of General Motors explains what he believes self-driving cars will mean for Detroit's future. Also today, we give you the first installment of our series UN/DIVIDED, a look Marshall's takeover of Albion schools and what it's meant for families.

How do you fill a vacant seat in Congress? Should our government work more with the private sector to build roads and bridges? And should the state seize control of local government pension funds? We bring you those answers today on Stateside.

Today on Stateside, a Muslim community leader says President Trump's retweets of anti-Muslim videos is "disappointing" and "disheartening." And, a columnist with the Detroit Free Press explains why we need to "look at who is getting a pass" in sexual abuse investigations.

Today on Stateside, we talk to a physician who nearly died at her own hospital. Now, she's calling on medical staffers everywhere to be more empathetic. Also today, a deer specialist explains chronic wasting disease's impact on animals this year and what the Department of Natural Resources has learned from deer submitted by hunters for testing. And, Enbridge defends its agreement with the state on the Line 5 pipeline.

Today on Stateside, a member of the state Pipeline Safety Advisory Board explains why the state's agreement with Enbridge "mostly goes in the wrong direction." And, in a holiday rendition of Theater Talk, we learn what's playing now on Michigan stages.

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., says the process for handling harassment complaints in Congress needs "immediate changes." And, a Hall of Fame teacher explains why classrooms of the future should not include whiteboards and markers.

Today on Stateside, former MSU and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar pleads guilty to first-degree criminal sexual conduct. Then, Detroit artist Carl Wilson using powerful linoleum prints to tell overlooked stories. And, we'll go back to the first Detroit Lions Thanksgiving Day game. 

Today on Stateside, we discuss the sexual harassment claims about long-time Detroit Democratic Congressman John Conyers. Among other things, the Congressman is alleged to have used taxpayer money to settle a sexual harassment complaint made by a female staffer. And, a professor argues Eastern Michigan University's deal to boost online classes dilutes the value of degrees.

Today on Stateside, the president of Kalamazoo College explains why it's baffling to him that Congress would try to impose a "tax on knowledge." And, we learn how a third-grade reading law could hold back 70 percent of English language learners.

Today on Stateside, we hear how the USDA is working to regain trust of minority and female farmers. And, after thinking his career was over, Jeff Daniels explains he's now busier than ever. 

By rallying hunters, one man has donated more than half a million meals to shelters. He joined Stateside today. Also on the show, we learn why one group is putting books in laundromats and why Detroit's housing demolition program is "partially to blame" for rising lead levels in the city's kids.

As thousands of hunters head out with rifles today, a tiny group of Michiganders heads out with birds instead. We talk with one of those falconers on Stateside​. Also today, an ecologist says biodiversity could be the planet's "insurance policy," but only if we act fast. And, we learn Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar is considering a guilty plea to charges he sexually assaulted young athletes.

Today on Stateside, a pipeline safety expert says the latest Line 5 controversy is about lack of trust and transparency. And, we hear venison recipes and cooking tips from the chef of Traverse City's Trattoria Stella.

If a juvenile lifer maintains his innocence, he may never get out of prison. We learn why that is today on Stateside. And, the executive director of the Michigan Head Start Association says the program's infrastructure is "very solid"despite the 11 centers closing in Southwest Detroit.

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint Township, talks about the tax reform plan being worked out in Washington. Then, are prisoners in Michigan cut out of civil rights protection? The federal court says no. The Attorney General disagrees. Plus, listen to the story of how the U.S. Army air-dropped pianos onto World War II battlefields. 

Today on Stateside, Rep. Upton says the Republican tax plan will make us "more competitive with the rest of the world." We also hear about a program that helps veterans find camaraderie through beekeeping. And, after being released this spring, a former juvenile lifer talks college, forgiveness, and second chances.

Today on Stateside, Gordie Howe's son recalls growing up with Mr. Hockey. Also today, we contextualize some election results and learn how a Harbor Springs boarding school worked to erase Odawa culture until the 1980s. 

Today on Stateside, we learn who is responsible for what roads in Michigan. We also hear how auto insurance costs can vary wildly depending on which side of the street you live. And, we talk to the filmmaker of a new documentary that chronicles the highs and lows of Detroit rapper Danny Brown.

Come next January, Lansing's going to have itself a new mayor for the first time in a dozen years. Today on Stateside, outgoing mayor Virg Bernero reflects on his legacy. Also today, from mailers and commercials to donations, we hear why tracking all of the money in local elections is not easy. And, can soul food be vegan? We learn why Detroit restaurateurs say yes as they serve up meatless favorites.

Today on Stateside, we discuss Amazon's next potential disruption: auto dealerships. We also hear how Detroit's lopsided mayor's race still reveals divisions. And, we discuss the bill that'd scrap state ballast water rules – the ones that help keep out invasive species.

Today on Stateside, Google's education evangelist says he's living proof that education disrupts poverty. We also learn watching TV is good for you – in space, that is. Also today, we hear about a prisoner awaiting resentencing while knowing he could get life without parole again.

Today on Stateside, we learn how Michigan is fighting hepatitis A to prevent its spread. And, we look back at the history of the Mackinac Bridge in honor of its 60th birthday. Also on the show, we discuss the court-martial that begins today for the Marine drill instructor accused of abusing Muslim recruits.

On this Halloween day, we hear how hauntings and paranormal activities abound in Michigan. We also learn about the honor system state legislators have when it comes to spending campaign donations. And, researchers explain what sheep have to do with a possible cure for Huntington's Disease.

Affordable Care Act enrollment opens this week for the first time under President Trump. Today on Stateside, we learn what's changed. And, Michigan Radio's sports commentator discusses the need for higher medical standards in the Big Ten.

Today on Stateside, an author details the "ecological unraveling" of the Great Lakes. We also hear why Detroit was the "obvious choice" for the inaugural Women's Convention, and how state regulators could shift the medical marijuana industry to benefit some and keep others out. Also today, Sen. Gary Peters joins the show and says, "We can't just have an open blank check for military use around the world."

Pages