Stateside

this is the correct one

Ryan Elder

One way to prevent accidents might come from redesigning road signs. 

user danielctw / Flickr

Toyota is making changes to its top staff, with more North Americans rising in the ranks.

"For the first time they are elevating some Americans to some very key positions," says Daniel Howes, who recently wrote an article about the changes for the Detroit News.

Today on Stateside:

  • U.S. Sen. Gary Peters discusses working with members from across the aisle on the two bills he has co-signed.
  • Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes tells us about his recent column on Toyota’s inclusion of more North Americans in high-level positions.
Potholes
Peter Ito / flickr

Proposal 1 is the road funding proposal that will be up for a vote on May 5th. The Michigan Chamber of Commerce has long expressed their support for a road funding solution, but they are staying neutral on the proposal.

Gary Peters / Facebook

When he was elected to the U.S. Senate, Gary Peters promised to approach his job in a spirit of bipartisan cooperation. He says that's exactly what's behind the first two bills he has introduced in the Senate.

Flickr user Penn State Special Collections / Flickr

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the confrontation between civil rights marchers and Alabama State Troopers known as Bloody Sunday.

Retired teacher and librarian with Detroit Public Schools Gloria Mills has organized a bus trip to Selma for this weekend's commemoration.

Flickr/Martha Soukup

The Next Idea

Living in Michigan, we experience incivility on a daily basis, from simply driving down pot-hole filled roads to attending public meetings to logging into our social media accounts. This has to change, and not just so our Facebook feeds can feel more like a cocktail party -- though that’s not a bad place to start.

Beyond my ken / Wikimedia Commons

One of the greatest skyscrapers in Detroit is on the auction block.

The Fisher Building and its next-door neighbor, The Albert Kahn Building, have fallen into foreclosure as they struggle with fewer and fewer tenants.

Dan Austin is with the Detroit Free Press, and he runs HistoricDetroit.org.

  Today on Stateside:

  • More on a bill that would require cell phone carriers in Michigan to release location information to police in the event of an emergency.
  • The Fisher Building in Detroit is on the auction block.
  • The ice caves at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Lake Superior.
  • A new book from Andrew Hoffman, How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate
  • Why a teen crisis hotline is communicating by text only.
texting with a cell phone
Alton / Creative Commons

The idea of a teen crisis line isn't new.

But think about it: When's the last time you've seen a teenager pick up a phone, dial a number and call someone?

The average teen sends some 2,000 text messages a month.

Smart phone.
Johan Larsson / Flickr

The bill, if passed, would require cell phone carriers in Michigan to release location information to police in the event of an emergency.

In short, according to this House Fiscal Agency analysis, the bill does this:

The scientific community largely agrees climate change is taking place. Yet the public debate over climate change is often polarizing.

Andrew Hoffman wanted to explore just what causes people to accept or reject the scientific consensus on climate change. The result is his new book How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate.

Hoffman is the Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan. He is also a Professor of Sustainable Enterprise.

user crossn81
Flickr

Before the ice melts, let's take time to celebrate one of winter's great gifts: the sea caves at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore.

Eighteen miles west of Bayfield, Wisconsin is where you can find the island chain in Lake Superior. The islands and the ice have created a breathtaking natural art gallery.

Prison bars.
Thomas Hawk / Flickr

If you are a 17-year-old and you break a law here in Michigan, you’re going to be tried as an adult.

Michigan is one of nine states that tries 17-year-olds as adults.

Today on Stateside:

  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made his much anticipated speech to Congress today.
  • LaughFest 2015 begins Thursday in Grand Rapids. Teresa Thome talks about her upcoming performance.
  • A Michigan State University professor is using “ambigram” designs to explore creative ways of thinking.
  • There are hundreds of kids aged 13 to 17 in Michigan's adult prisons. What's happening inside those prison walls?
Punya Mishra

A Michigan State University professor is using ambigrams to explore creative ways of thinking and playing. "Ambigram is a way of writing words so they can be read in many ways." 

Punya Mishra is a Professor of Educational Psychology and Educational Technology. His designs are being displayed at the MSU Museum. The exhibition is called “Deep-Play: Creativity in Math and Art through Visual Wordplay.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks to Congress.
PBS NewsHour / screenshot from YouTube

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made his much anticipated speech to Congress today. He made his case against a potential nuclear deal being negotiated with Iran by major powers, including the United States.

Watch the speech here.

LaughFest image.
LaughFest

Gilda’s LaughFest 2015 kicks off in Grand Rapids this Thursday (March 5).

The 10-day comedic festival will feature stand-up, comedy films, improv, comedy showcases and more all over West Michigan.

The festival was started by Gilda’s Club Grand Rapids, a survivor support group named after the late comic Gilda Radner.

You can see a full list of the events and venues here.

Today on Stateside:

  • As the debate over gun rights and regulations continues across the country, Michigan is seeing a surge in women with concealed pistol licenses.
  • The city of Battle Creek was in the CBS spotlight last night. Battle Creek police chief Jim Blocker joined us to talk about the new TV show Battle Creek.
  • Writer & publisher Bill Haney has crossed paths with some fascinating Michiganders. He writes about them in his new book, What They Were Thinking: Reflections of Michigan Difference-Makers.
  • Can Detroit be a "Design Mecca?" Michigan has a higher concentration of industrial designers than any other state.
  • Men are vanishing from the workplaces of America and certainly here in Michigan. That group of men aged 25-to-54 who are not working has more than tripled since the last 1960s.

FLICKR USER MARIO.Q / FLICKR

Men are vanishing from the workplaces of America, and Michigan workplaces are a prime example.

The group of unemployed men between the ages of 25 and 54 has more than tripled nationwide since the 1960s. A recent piece in the New York Times explored the lives of these "prime-age" men who are vanishing from the workforce. 

Of those men, 16% are now unemployed. But in Michigan, that number is much higher.

Pages