Stateside

Arts & Culture
5:27 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

Stateside: Gifts For 20 recognizes those lost in Sandy Hook tragedy

This week's local hero, 11-year-old Noah Hudson-Peralta, started Gifts for 20 to honor the victims of the Sandy Hook shooting.

11-year-old Noah Hudson-Peralta wants to remember the young boys and girls who lost their lives in the Sandy Hook tragedy. 

He came up with the idea of Gifts For 20 in honor of the twenty children who passed away.

On Saturday, December 22nd, "Sandy Hook Day", Noah encourages everyone to give presents to disadvantaged children by donating to the Toys for Tots drive in their local area.

Listen to our interview with Noah and his father Ryan Hudson-Peralta above. 

Politics & Government
5:25 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

Stateside for Thursday, December 20, 2012

Stateside for Thursday, December 20, 2012

It has been a momentous year for Michigan.

Today we looked back at the stories that made political headlines with Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta.

The Detroit News' Bill Loomis spoke with Cyndy about various holiday feasts of the 19th century.

Noah Hudson-Peralta, our local hero, started a program for those affected by the Sandy Hook tragedy.

And Michigan Radio's Mercedes Mejia provided a look at aquaponics in Detroit.

We thank you for a great 2012, and look forward to speaking again with you in 2013!

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Transportation
5:05 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

Stateside: A 2012 review of the auto industry

The auto industry had some big stories in 2012.

Stateside spoke with Michelle Krebs, senior analyst at edmunds.com, and Tracy Samilton, auto beat reporter for Michigan Radio about this past automotive year. 

Sales are up in Detroit's 'Big Three' automotive companies, and the companies are adding jobs.

One of the biggest themes this year was fuel efficiency, especially with the new government Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards.

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Offbeat
5:34 pm
Wed December 19, 2012

Stateside: Two firefighters' impressions of "BURN"

Chris Palm and Tony Angelucey shared their experiences of fighting fires
detroitfirefilm.org

Firefighter Chris Palm and Sergeant Tony Angelucey spoke with Cyndy about "BURN" and their accounts of putting out fires.

It’s possible to leave “BURN” feeling as if you’ve just combated the inferno of multiple house fires.

The documentary- which utilizes actual footage of Detroit firefighters- is strikingly realistic, unlike previous films of its kind.

Firefighter Chris Palm and Sergeant Tony Angelucey shared their accounts of entering burning buildings.

Though an experienced firefighter, Angelucey was pleased with the shift of perspective the film afforded him.

“It was shocking to see what we do. We’re always doing it, so we don’t usually get to sit back and watch it unravel,” he said.

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Politics & Government
5:09 pm
Wed December 19, 2012

Stateside for December 19, 2012

Stateside for December 19, 2012.

Adie Tomer, a Senior Research Associate at the Brookings Institution, says that implementing a mass transit system in Detroit is entirely possible. Hear Tomer's reasons in today's podcast.

Detroit News' Daniel Howes provided Stateside with a look ahead at the coming year's political agenda.

Firefighter Chris Palm and Sergeant Tony Angelucey spoke with Stateside about fires in Detroit and the film, "BURN."

And Bridge Magazine's Rick Haglund explained why both firefighters and police officers were exempt from right-to-work.

Politics & Government
4:52 pm
Wed December 19, 2012

Stateside: Police and fire unaffected by right-to-work in Michigan

Police offers and firefighters were exempt from right-to-work. Why? Rick Haglund of Bridge Magazine provided the answers
jalopnik.com

Two groups, police officers and firefighters, were exempt from the right-to-work legislation.

Rick Haglund of Bridge Magazine said the exemption dates back to the late 1960's.

“Police and firefighters have a special recognition under state law called Public Act 312, which prevents firefighters and police officers from striking. It goes back to 1969, and the person who introduced the legislation was Coleman Young, who at that time was a State Senator," he said.

This act prevented them from striking but gave them binding arbitration.

However, those opposed to right-to-work are still wondering why these  groups were exempt.

According to Haglund, they have reason to be curious.

“It turns out that Michigan is the only state that does this. There are no other right-to-work states that do a carve out for police and fire,” said Haglund.

For more of Haglund's interview, listen to our above podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Transportation
4:04 pm
Wed December 19, 2012

Stateside: Mass transit a possible option for the state

A light rail system proposed in Detroit.
screen grab from YouTube video

Adie Tomer spoke with Stateside about the possibility of mass transit in Michigan.

Michigan’s  Regional Transit Authority will attempt to redesign travel throughout the state.

Adie Tomer, a Senior Research Associate at the Brookings Institution, says implementing a mass transit system in Detroit is entirely possible. Tomer says the state has put spending highway infrastructure ahead of spending on mass transit.

"One of the consequences of building out so many highways… is an underinvestment relative to those highway miles for public transit. In many ways, this left Detroit as one of the few cities without a major mass transit system," said Tomer.

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Politics & Government
5:11 pm
Tue December 18, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, December 18, 2012

The Grand Rapids School Board last night gave unanimous approval to a major restructuring plan. Superintendent Teresa Weatherall Neal spoke with Cyndy about the future of Grand Rapids schools.

Saul Anuzis, the former Chairman of the Michigan Republican Party and Debbie Dingell, a Democratic National Committeewoman, shared their thoughts on Michigan's 2013 political agenda.

Early 20th century steam ships traveling from Chicago to South Haven carried some promiscuous passengers. Historian Larry Massie wrote a November article entitled “Floating Gomorra" for Encore Magazine, in which he investigates these ships and the people who frequented them.

Kyle Norris aired the first installment of her investigation of Detroit's homeless population. Listen to our podcast to hear Norris experience.

Education
5:07 pm
Tue December 18, 2012

Stateside: Grand Rapids restructures its districts to save money, improve education

The Grand Rapids School Board approved a district restructuring plan
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

On Monday, The Grand Rapids School Board unanimously approved a district restructuring plan. Recommended by Superintendent Teresa Weatherall Neal, the plan aims to both improve student achievement and save money.

The “Transformation Plan” attempts to reinvent the school district by closing ten buildings, reopening one elementary and reforming other programs. The plan will save more than $22.4 million over five years, with at least half being re-invested in replicating and expanding effective school programs.

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Politics & Government
4:21 pm
Tue December 18, 2012

Stateside: Lame duck concludes, 2013 comes into focus

After the frenzy, all is quiet inside the Michigan House of Representatives.
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

Lansing’s lame duck session has ended, allowing politicians to focus on their 2013 agendas.

To better understand what both parties will discuss, we heard from Saul Anuzis and Debbie Dingell.

Anuzis is the former Chairman of the Michigan Republican Party and Dingell is a Democratic National Committeewoman.

Dingell expressed concern over the speed with which right-to-work legislation passed.

“People in Michigan were stunned by many of the bills that passed so quickly without discussion,” said Dingell.

“The lame duck session every two years is something where a lot of bills move very quickly. I don’t think anybody was surprised…” said Anuzis.

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Offbeat
4:06 pm
Tue December 18, 2012

Stateside: Sailing on a ship of pleasure

Similar steam ships sailed equipped with alcohol and swing music in the early 20th century
holger.ellgaard

Early 20th-century steam ships traveling from Chicago to South Haven carried some promiscuous passengers.

Historian Larry Massie wrote a November article entitled “Floating Gomorra" for Encore Magazine, in which he investigated these ships and the people who frequented them.

In his article, Massie said that South Haven, a Mecca for Chicago tourists, placed a ban on alcohol.

This ban, said Massie, carried no authority on board the steam ships.

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Investigative
3:56 pm
Tue December 18, 2012

Stateside: Med team brings "street medicine" to Detroit's homeless

Street Medicine is a mobile medical clinic that services Detroit
streetmedicine.org

Several Wayne State University students started Street Medicine Detroit in May.

They’d heard about a similar program in Pittsburg and they were inspired. They partnered with a Detroit non-profit called Neighborhood Service Organization and together they created a mobile medical clinic.

Philip Ramsey is a community outreach specialist with NSO. (Rumor has it that if you’re trying to locate a specific homeless person, and you give Ramsey the vaguest of details, he can go out and find that person who might be living in a tent next to highway.)

It’s Ramsey’s job to drive the med team around the streets and back-alleys of Detroit and to help them locate homeless people who are in need of medical services.

So once a week, the van rumbles down Michigan Avenue past prostitutes on the corners and a young man pushing a baby stroller.  Ramsey helps the team find people who are lying down on the ground or sitting on the curb. He says additional clues that someone may be homeless are people with dirty clothes and uncombed hair, or people who are openly drinking.

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Politics & Government
5:31 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

Stateside for Monday, December 17, 2012

Stateside for Monday, December 17, 2012

Governor Rick Snyder must decide whether to approve or veto legislation that would allow concealed pistols in churches, day care centers and public schools. Michigan Public Radio Bureau Chief Rick Pluta spoke with Cyndy about the legislation.

Writer Micki Maynard sees parallels between New Orleans and Detroit- both cities share similar stories of revitalization and growth. Hear what Maynard said Detroit could learn from New Orleans.

Throughout the week we will be airing a series of stories Michigan Radio's Kyle Norris compiled on homelessness in Detroit. Today was Norris' introduction to the piece, as she discussed the various things that compelled her to write the story.

How would consumers in America function without paper currency? Miles Kimball, Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan, advocates the switch from paper to electronic currency. Hear Kimball's interview in today's podcast.

Economy
4:11 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

Stateside: Stories shared between two recovering cities

New Orleans
sassycrafter Flickr

New Orleans and Detroit share a common story of recovery.

After Hurricane Katrina's devastation, New Orleans resembled Detroit post-economic crisis.

Writer Micki Maynard spoke with Cyndy about similarities she has seen between the two cities.

“Many people think that what happened in Detroit is the equivalent of an economic storm,” said Maynard.

Maynard has witnessed an influx of people moving from other cities to both New Orleans and Detroit, bringing with them fresh ideas of growth and innovation.

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Politics & Government
3:59 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

Stateside: Reconsidering Michigan's proposed gun legislation

Governor Synder's decision to pass or veto the recent gun bill will affect schools and churches
flickr

Governor Snyder is considering a bill that would allow concealed pistols in churches, public schools and daycares.

Michigan Public Radio Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta outlined the various aspects of the legislation.

“One of the trade-offs in this legislation would be that schools would no longer be open-carry areas. But they would be someplace where you could carry a concealed pistol if you took more classes," said Pluta.

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Investigative
2:40 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

Stateside: Investigating Detroit's homeless population

Money awarded to help homeless veterans.
user anonymonous Flickr

Airing this week will be a series of stories Michigan Radio’s Kyle Norris compiled on Detroit’s homeless population.

To introduce the series,  Norris spoke with Meghan Takashima of the Corporation for Supportive Housing.

They spoke about some of the misconceptions people have about those without a home.

Norris began by noting her inspiration for the stories.

“Something is drawing me to these stories…when I’m with homeless people I have to be real, I have to be a human first and a reporter second,” said Norris.

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Economy
12:36 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

Stateside: Moving to an electronic currency

Miles Kimball says a switch to electronic currency would benefit the economy
sushi ina flickr

How would consumers in America function without paper currency?

Miles Kimball, Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan, advocates the switch from paper to electronic currency.

“The thing you want to do is make it so we can stimulate the economy with monetary policy. A lot of people don’t realize that the reason we’ve had such a long recession is because the Federal Reserve was not able to lower the interest rate because of the way our system uses money. If you tried to make the interest rate negative, which would be what is needed to stimulate the economy, then people would just keep money under the mattress. Because of that, the Federal Reserve is not able to lower the interest rate low enough to get the economy moving.”

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Politics & Government
5:27 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Stateside for Thursday, December 13, 2012

Stateside for Thursday, December 12, 2012

Today we investigated Michigan's busy lame duck session. Michigan Radio's Jack Lessenberry and Bill Ballenger of "Inside Michigan Politics" spoke about some of the legislation and its long-term effects.

One of the reform policies is that of Blue Cross Blue Shield. Peter Luke of Bridge Magazine spoke with Cyndy about Blue Cross' future and its policy changes.

Michigan had a significant role in the Underground Railroad. Today we spoke with Dr. Roy Finkenbine about some brave Michiganians who worked to free slaves.

Representative Dan Benishek claims that cuts to our country's defense budget would not sacrifice our safety. Listen to our podcast to hear his reasons.

Economy
3:38 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Stateside: Where Michigan stands in the fiscal cliff

Does this resemble the 'cliff' we are fast approaching?
wikimedia commons

Stateside talks fiscal cliff

With the approaching "fiscal cliff" comes the concern of protecting Michigan’s businesses.  

We spoke today with Susan Tompor of the Detroit Free Press about the fiscal cliff.

Tompor noted that many companies are not laying off their workers.

“Back in November we had Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford Jr. state that it was vitally important that they work on this bipartisan agreement for the economy. When you’re selling big-ticket items, it’s a key issue. Will consumers need to cut back if we got over the fiscal cliff? Right now, according to Mark Zandi [Chief Economist, Moody’s Analytics], he doesn’t see that companies are cutting back. The reason is that it would be costly to lay off workers now to prepare for what might be a temporary problem. Instead Zandi said that, overall, businesses are more likely to cut back on investing in heavy equipment as a stop-gap measure,” said Tompor.

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Politics & Government
3:36 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Stateside: An unusually active lame duck session

Bill Ballenger and Jack Lessenberry provided an assessment of this year's lame duck session
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

There is an abundance of political action in this year’s lame duck session.

Bill Ballenger of “Inside Michigan Politics” and Michigan Radio’s Jack Lessenberry spoke with Cyndy about the recent legislature coming out of the Capitol.

According to Lessenberry there were several reasons for right-to-work being passed.

“The legislature will be marginally more Democratic next time. Some of the people who were voting are people who aren’t coming back. It was a campaign year and some of the stuff that might have gotten done earlier didn’t get done,” said Lessenberry.

“Legislators have been working on a lot of these bills for a year and a half,” said Ballenger.

Ballenger noted the role of partisan politics in the lame duck session.

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