Stateside

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Stateside: Investigating Michigan's homicide rate

Jan 15, 2013
http://jmc.msu.edu/alumni/madisonian.php?id=23

Though the national homicide rate has declined over the past decades, many Michigan cities are struggling to follow the trend.

Dayne Walling, Mayor of Flint and Gregg Barak, Professor of Criminology at Eastern Michigan University and author of "Violence and Nonviolence: Pathways to Understanding" spoke with Cyndy about the state’s homicides.

“Homicide rates across the country are down to about 4.8 per 100,000…Here in Michigan, the state as a whole is at 6.2. In Detroit, it’s eight times higher…I’m not that surprised in terms of Detroit. Its rate today is no higher than it was when we were identified as the murder capital of the world,” said Barak.

Stateside for Monday, January 14, 2013

Jan 14, 2013

Theresa Flores is working to eliminate human trafficking.

We spoke today with Flores about trafficking's presence at the Auto Show.

What would wolf hunting mean for Michigan? Adam Bump of the Michigan DNR spoke with Cyndy about the hunt.

Michigan is now the fifth-fattest state in the country. This is no cause for celebration, so put down that cake. 

Dr. Tom Peterson of Helen DeVos Children's Hospital addressed possible ways of reducing our state's waistline.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

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Stateside: Michigan is now fifth most obese state in America

Jan 14, 2013
ObesityinAmerica.org / The Endocrine Society and The Hormone Health Network

It is estimated that nearly 50 percent of Michigan residents will be obese by 2030.

But don’t throw your salad out in reckless abandon just yet.

There is hope for your waistline, said Dr. Tom Peterson.

Director of Quality, Safety and Community Health at DeVos Children’s Hospital, Peterson helped organize ShapeMichigan.

According to Peterson, obesity is a relatively new problem.

Stateside: What Upper Peninsula wolf hunt means for Michigan

Jan 14, 2013
Tracy Brooks/Mission Wolf/USFWS

Gray wolves in the Upper Peninsula are a step closer to being hunted this fall.

A new state law designating wolves as game animals in Michigan passed late last year.

Adam Bump of Michigan Department of Natural Resources spoke with Cyndy about the implications of hunting wolves.

“The focus was to give the DNR the full range of options for wolf management," said Bump.

Bump noted the conflicts the wolves created.

“There certainly is a lot of conflict that exists surrounding wolves. We’ve had consistent depredations where wolves are praying on livestock.”

traffickfree

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Though largely unrecognized and difficult to pin a number to, human trafficking occurs in Michigan. Theresa Flores says the practice increases during events like the North American International Auto Show.

Flores heads Save Our Adolescents from Prostitution (S.O.A.P), a group actively working to rescue young girls and boys from trafficking.

S.O.A.P. is making a visit to the Auto Show in an attempt to reduce the prostitution that can plague large events like this.

Imagine what you might know about physical space and tranquility if you lived in a drug house, an abandoned building, or jail.

That’s the experience for many of the women who stay at the Women and Family Treatment and Shelter at Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries. They often come from intense circumstances to the shelter, in order to make big changes in their lives.

The shelter is housed in a former convent. On the third floor everything reeks of fresh paint. A professional paint company has donated the paint and man power to paint the walls. The long hallway is now sky-blue and the twenty rooms where the women live now have fresh coats of cotton-candy pink and lemon-yellow paint.

Terry Grahl runs the non-profit Enchanted Makeovers and she’s making this large-scale renovation happen by coordinating a symphony of volunteers and businesses. She got a church in Taylor to making curtains for all the rooms. An artist from Georgia is coming in to paint murals on the walls and the shelter is also getting new ceiling fans and new floors.

Stateside for Thursday, January 10, 2013

Jan 10, 2013

For part three of her investigation of Detroit's homeless population, Michigan Radio's Kyle Norris looked at a series of homeless shelter renovations.

What is "dark money?" We spoke with Rich Robinson today about secretive campaign funding.

Michigan is making wine. Check out our podcast to hear about the specifics of our state's wine production.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

Stateside: Dark money in campaign funding

Jan 10, 2013
User: penywise / MorgueFile

There is an ongoing trend of furtive campaign funding in Michigan.

Rich Robinson, executive director of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network, said voters should demand transparency from their elected officials and their funding.

Robinson called this undisclosed funding “dark money.”

And the two biggest sources of it are, according to Robinson, Michigan’s Democrat and Republican parties.

“My basic premise is that people don’t spend large amounts of money in politics for philanthropic motives. Essentially, they’re advancing their own interests in politics,” he said.

According to Robinson, citizens have a right to know where the money comes from.

Stateside: The great grape state

Jan 10, 2013
user farlane / flickr

Michigan is the fourth-largest grape producing state.

This is good news for wine lovers.

According to the Michigan Grape and Wine Industry Council, there are 101 commercial wineries producing more than 1.3 million gallons of wine annually.

Christopher Cook, Chief Restaurant Critic and Wine Writer for Hour Magazine, spoke with Zoe Clark about the state’s growing industry.

“When our auto industry was in so much trouble, the wine industry was beginning to boom. In the past decade it has come the distance and has now reached a point in quality and size where it is being recognized across the country,” said Cook.

Stateside for Wednesday, January 9, 2013

Jan 9, 2013

What does 2013 have in store for Michigan politics?

Saul Anuzis, former chairman of Michigan Republican Party, and Debbie Dingell, President of D2 Strategies, spoke with Zoe Clark about the upcoming political year.

Detroit News' Daniel Howes addressed what Krystal Crittendon's removal means for Detroit City Council.

As city budgets dwindle, Michigan’s police departments are making cuts to their programs.

“Every police department in the state is smaller today than it was ten years ago,” said Robert Stevenson.

(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

What does 2013 have in store for Michigan politics?

Saul Anuzis, former chairman of the Michigan Republican Party, and Debbie Dingell, President of D2 Strategies, spoke today with Zoe Clark.

They addressed the importance of Democrats and Republicans collaborating on key issues for the state.

Dingell predicted an ardent strategy from Democrats.

“The air is not cleared and will be an issue for the next two years. The challenge for Democrats is to develop a strategy that gets at the core of the issue but doesn’t hurt Michigan in the process,” said Dingell.

“The biggest challenge for all of us is, how do we do what’s right and what’s best for Michigan? How do we move forward on good public policy where we actually have common ground?” said Anuzis.

Stateside: Dwindling budgets affect Michigan police departments

Jan 9, 2013
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

As city budgets dwindle, Michigan’s police departments are making cuts to their programs.

“Every police department in the state is smaller today than it was ten years ago,” said Robert Stevenson.

Stevenson, who is Executive Director of Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police, said this is due to a combination of a reduction in revenue and reduced property tax values.

“When there is less money coming in, there has to be reductions and typically, public safety, police and fire take up more than 50% of a city’s total expenditures, therefore they’re hit the hardest.”

He saw few immediate solutions to the cuts.

Stateside for Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Jan 8, 2013

Michigan Supreme Court Justice Diane Hathaway will resign on January 21st. We spoke with University of Detroit Mercy Law School professor Larry Dubin about her resignation and the future of the Court.

Do you have your flu vaccination? Dr. Dean Sienko of the Michigan Department of Community spoke about all things flu season.

We spoke with Heidi Alcock and Tom Goddeeris about neighborhood revitalization in Detroit and how we can all improve our surroundings.

Hear these stories and more on today's podcast.

Stateside: Entering flu season equipped with vaccination

Jan 8, 2013
user the consumerist / Flickr

Audio Pending...

Flu vaccinations are invaluable for anyone aiming to stay healthy this winter.

Dr. Dean Sienko, Interim Chief Medical Executive for the Michigan Department of Community Health, stressed the importance of vaccinations.

“It looks like this is going to be one of our worst flu seasons in the past decade. The important thing is that citizens take this seriously.”

According to Sienko, only 20% of the Michigan population has been vaccinated. He recommended that almost everyone over six months of age receive a vaccination.

Stateside: Concerned residents and their neighborhood improvements

Jan 8, 2013
http://www.grandmontrosedale.com/business.html

Detroit's revitalization is a recurring topic on Stateside.

The city's vacant buildings are an interactive lesson in real estate and community maintenance.

Today, Stateside focused on neighborhood improvement and community engagement.

Heidi Alcock of the Detroit Vacant Property Campaign and Tom Goddeeris of the Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation shared their revitalization goals.

Alcock started the Detroit Vacant Property Campaign to reduce the amount of abandoned buildings in Detroit- improving both property value and morale.

“One vacant property can be very dangerous on an otherwise stable block,” said Alcock.

“Beginning with the mortgage foreclosure crisis we’ve seen vacancy rate go from about 2% in 2000 to 11% in 2010. Probably the biggest impact it’s had on our community is that it has driven values down,” said Goddeeris.

Eridony / flickr

Michigan Supreme Court Justice Diane Hathaway will resign January 21.

The news came after the state’s Judicial Tenure Commission unveiled a 19-page complaint accusing her of money laundering, fraud and tax evasion.

“It is an event that has never happened and I think is of very great consequence,” said Larry Dubin of University of Detroit Mercy Law School.

“There is an adversarial relationship between the Judicial Tenure Commission and judges they eventually go after.”

The Michigan Supreme Court opens its 2012 session this week.
Subterranean / Flickr

Michigan Supreme Court Justice Marilyn Kelly retired this week.

The 74-year-old Kelly couldn't run again because the State Constitution bars judicial candidates from seeking office if they're over 70 years of age.

Justice Kelly stated her satisfaction with her time served in Michigan.

“I’ve been delighted to help shape the law in this state…I think the courts made some good decisions over the years,” she said.

According to an independent annual audit, Detroit's deficit recently reached almost $327 million.

Detroit Free Press editorial writer Nancy Kaffer addressed the city’s dire financial status.

Kaffer said Detroit is closer to having an emergency financial manager, but was unsure as to how soon it would happen.

“There is a relatively dysfunctional relationship between the Mayor and the Council... you really have to have everybody on board together to get some of the dramatic changes they’re looking for,” said Kaffer.

Stateside: The state of our waste

Jan 7, 2013
skatebiker / Wikimedia Commons

Mark Kurlyandchik, author of “Waste Matters,” is tracking his trash.

Kurlyandchik’s recent Hour Magazine article investigated Michigan’s treatment of its waste materials.

Some of his findings were striking.

“The average American produces almost four and a half pounds of trash a day. The U.S. makes up four percent of the world’s population, but we generate 30 percent of the global waste,” he said.

Kurlyandchik noted the country’s culture of consumerism as a reason for this large amount of waste.

Stateside for Monday, January 7, 2013

Jan 7, 2013

Today, we spoke with Mark Kurlyandchik about where our waste goes. His recent Hour Magazine article, "Waste Matters" investigated the state of landfills in Michigan.

Are you ready for the Red Wings?

Michigan Radio's John U. Bacon spoke today about the NHL's comeback.

Does Detroit need a financial manager? Detroit Free Press writer Nancy Kaffer spoke about the city's economic situation.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

Stateside for Thursday, January 3, 2013

Jan 3, 2013

Today, Michigan Radio's Kyle Norris brought us to a center that teaches vogue dancing to LGBTQ children.

The Detroit News' Daniel Howes and Michigan Radio's Jack Lessenberry discussed Congress' recent fiscal cliff agreement and what it means for Michigan businesses.

How did the Auto Industry fare in 2012? Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton provided a recap.

All of those stories and more on today's Stateside.

Kyle Norris

Matthew Dawson is the kid wearing sunglasses inside, in the middle of the day. He’s in a room full of about twenty kids who flip, dip, and cat-walk in a dance style known as “vogue.” (For a quick reference, think Madonna’s “Vogue” video from 1990.)

He says this style of dancing is a powerful way for him to express himself. “One of the emotions I say I put into my vogue is anger. I feel like I put it into vogue so I won’t have to put it into other things that are not very constructive.”

Matthew Dawson says as an LGBTQ young person, if he danced like this in the outside world—or on the street—he would not be safe.  And these vogue dancers find safety in their dance community.

Among the many voices at the Ruth Ellis Center is Adesola Akinleye, a professional dancer and choreographer. She contacted the center  to be of service to the LGBTQ young adults who come there.

She teaches them ballet.

But the youth have also been teaching her about the world of vogue dancing.

Listen to Michigan Radio’s Kyle Norris audio postcard above.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Higher education at the core of Michigan's revival

Jan 3, 2013
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Creating cities with educated populations will play a large role in Michigan's revitalization.

Lou Glazer, President and co-founder of Michigan Future Inc., says that globalization and technology are more powerful in creating a new Michigan than politics or policy.

“You have to be inventing what’s next," he said.

Glazer's new agenda aims to create a city in which talent wants to live.

To do so, he claims, there has to be a high population of college-educated citizens.

“The places that are doing the best... have a community DNA that values learning, entrepreneurship and being welcoming to all," said Glazer.

For more of Glazer's interview, listen to the audio above.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Congress passed a bill Tuesday that would prevent the U.S. from falling over the 'fiscal cliff.'

Addressing the bill’s impact on Michigan were Daniel Howes of the Detroit News and Jack Lessenberry of Michigan Radio.

“The Michigan Republicans in the delegation were clearly split on this… a lot of them didn’t like it. The Bush tax cuts the Democrats spent the last ten years railing against were essentially made permanent for 98% of the tax payers,” said Howes.

According to Howes, much of the state's workers will witness increased taxes this year.

“About 77% of people who work are going to be paying higher taxes,” said Howes.

“Everybody seems to object to paying for things they get… most of the tax increases are restoring the Social Security payroll tax to what it used to be,” said Lessenberry.

Stateside for Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Jan 2, 2013

Welcome back to Stateside!

Congress kicked off 2013 with a deal averting the dreaded "fiscal cliff."

On today's show, Cyndy speaks with Michigan State University economics professor Charley Ballard about what that means for the state.

Also, was 2012 the warmest year on record? And what kind of weather can we expect for 2013?

And finally, it's back-to-school day for students in Muskegon Heights. Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith breaks down the bumpy progress of Michigan's very first, fully privatized school district.

Stateside: Avoiding the fiscal cliff

Jan 2, 2013
Charley Ballard, Michigan State University economist, spoke with Cyndy about the health of Michigan's economy.
Michigan State University

The short-term compromise that Congress passed last night may have averted the immediate impacts of the so-called "fiscal cliff,” but bigger battles lie ahead for Congress and the White House.

Michigan State University Economics professor Charley Ballard spoke with Cindy about the deal and what we can expect in the coming months.

Ballard said he was hoping for a grand bargain, a much more comprehensive effort to deal with the country’s fiscal problems, but that something is better than nothing.

Stateside: Keeping our New Year's resolutions

Jan 2, 2013
normanack / flickr

New Year’s resolutions.

We may groan about them, we may proclaim that we are “above” making them, but it does seem that the New Year brings about a collective longing for a fresh start.

So, how do you keep going strong as the year goes on? And is it possible to turn a good intention into a lifelong, good habit?

University of Michigan psychologist Michelle Segar says the key to success is the ability to see something like exercise as a way to enhance our lives immediately, instead of the means to achieve a long-term goal.

Recovery Park is a project hoping to revitalize the city of Detroit and get people working. 

Gary Wozniak is the President and CEO.  

He has big plans for Recovery Park involving everything from growing Tilapia, to processing foods, and establishing a 30-acre farm scattered throughout the city.

“So the models that we’re looking at are a combination of the community gardening that’s happening in Detroit, the indoor agriculture that’s being promoted by Michigan State University and then a lot of the larger indoor models in Europe, predominately in the Netherlands,” Wozniak says.

A new urban agriculture ordinance will certainly play a big in making this redevelopment project a reality.

The idea started with Self Help Addiction Rehabilitation or (SHAR), a Detroit based substance abuse treatment program. 

SHAR’s mission is to transform individuals with addiction and those recovering a chance at a new life.

Wozniak has a very personal mission as well.


Mercedes Mejia

The Detroit Planning Commission recently approved a new Urban Agriculture Ordinance. The action takes the city a step closer to officially recognizing the dozens of urban farms and gardens scattered across the city.

The ordinance also defines the kinds of projects that would be allowed, such as farm stands, orchards or greenhouses. Stateside’s Mercedes Mejia reports some residents are experimenting with aquaponic systems. It’s a method of growing crops and fish at the same time.

Noah Link: Over here is our chicken coop. We have about 42 chickens and 4 ducks so far. You can hear the ducks – they’ve awfully loud and hungry probably.

Noah Link is the co-owner of Food Field. He lives and works in the Boston-Edison neighborhood in Detroit. I met up with him on his farm called Food Field. It’s on the site of a former elementary school - imagine a small farm tucked away in the city.

 "So if you go a few blocks one way there are huge historical mansions, and you go a few blocks the other way and it’s all run down old shops, and total poverty, and we’re right in between," he says.

Link and his business partner worked on several farms across the country. They knew it wouldn’t be easy to own a farm, but they’re doing the hard work. On the land are different kinds of crops, chickens, a few beehives, and a young orchard of fruit and nuts trees. There’s also a hoop house to grow vegetables year-round.

"And we’ve just built an aquaponic system to be able to raise fish in there, which I’ll show you."

An aquaponic system is a combination of hydroponics and aquaculture - growing plants in water and fish farming.

"And it takes the best of both of those in a self-sustaining system so then rather than having to worry about toxic fish waste to get rid of or keeping it sterile hydroponic environment for your plants, the plants grow out of the waste water from the fish that just get circulated with the pump and they clean out the water to keep it safe for all the fish in the tank," Link says.

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