Stateside

Politics & Government
4:52 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside for Monday, November 19, 2012

Stateside for Monday, November 19th, 2012

Nine months after the implementation of Michigan welfare reform, the number of Michigan families receiving state checks plummeted to the lowest level in more than 40 years. We spoke with Michigan Radio's Lester Graham and Ron French of Bridge Magazine about the cuts and their implications.

A lame-duck session for Lansing is in effect. Today, David Eggert talked about potential  for Michigan politics. Eggert writes for MLive and was joined by Michigan Radio's Jack Lessenberry.

Anne Dohrenwend, author of “Coming Around: Parenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender
Kids," spoke with Cyndy about parenting a gay child.  Joining her was Mike Neubecker of the support group PFLAG.

Economy
4:32 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: Welfare benefit reform takes effect, thousands in Michigan are impacted

Michigan's welfare reform impacted nearly 15,000 families
user Penywise morguefile

Stateside talks with Ron French and Lester Graham about changes to welfare in Michigan.

Nine months after a Michigan welfare reform was implemented, the number of Michigan families receiving state checks plummeted to the lowest level in more than 40 years.

More than 9,000 Michigan families were removed from cash assistance last fall, a number that has recently grown to 15,000.

Ron French, writer for Bridge Magazine, addressed the cuts.

“Last fall, the legislature reformed welfare in a way that put time limits on welfare recipients. The legislature wanted to enforce a limit of 48 months on welfare recipients. The legislature and governor wanted to move more people to the workforce," said French.

"But what happened is that the Department of Human Services took it a step further and really kicked off more people than would have been otherwise."

Michigan Radio’s Lester Graham noted the effect the cuts had on families’ ability to pay essential bills.

“Suddenly we saw 11,000 families kicked off of cash assistance, which meant they couldn’t pay their utilities or rent,” said Graham.

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Health
4:11 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: LGBT Parenting

A healthy relationship with one's gay child is of great importance
user Marlith Flickr

A child's decision to discuss his or her sexuality with a parent is a defining moment.

A parent's reaction can have critical effects on the confidence and health of their child.

Author Anne Dohrenwend addressed the ways one should communicate with a homosexual child.

Her new book, “Coming Around: Parenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Kids,” assesses healthy relationships between parents and their gay children.

Mike Neubecker of PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) also spoke with Cyndy.

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Sports
3:37 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: A growing Big Ten

The Big Ten Conference now includes Maryland and Rutgers

The Big Ten Conference will soon include 14 teams.

Michigan Radio's John U. Bacon addressed the conference's decision to bring Maryland and Rutgers into its competitive network.

“On the Michigan chat boards, it is 98% apocalyptic disgust. It should be noted, that is in great contrast to Nebraska joining last year. They are not against expansion, per se,” said Bacon.

The potential financial gains are of great interest to the conference, said Bacon.

“The whole reason why they are doing that is the Big Ten Network’s footprint. This can add up to around $200 million dollars. I can think of no other reason why they would do it,” said Bacon.

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Politics & Government
3:32 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: Addressing Michigan's lame-duck session

Though in a lame-duck session, there exists the possibility for action in the capitol
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Michigan lawmakers are currently in a "lame-duck" session.

With some politicians nearing the ends of their terms, a mixed sense of delay and progress pervades Lansing.

David Eggert, political contributor for MLive and Michigan Radio’s Jack Lessenberry talked about the typical work ethic of a lame-duck period.

“Some of these folks won’t be coming back, so I think they feel somewhat liberated and also under pressure to get things done,” said Lessenberry.

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Politics & Government
5:10 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside for Thursday, November 15, 2012

Stateside for Thursday, November 15, 2012

Today we investigated health insurance exchanges, an integral part of the Affordable Care Act.

Helping define the exchanges was  Helen Levy, a Research Associate Professor at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

Michigan Radio Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta helped assess the politics behind the new policies.

Mike Draper has Midwest respect. Draper spoke about the region and his book, "The Midwest: God's Gift To Planet Earth."

Opening at 555 Nonprofit Gallery this weekend is "Jailed Humanity: In Support of an American's Quest for Freedom from an Iranian Prison." Talking about the exhibition and her detainee brother was Sarah Hekmati.

Veteran Glenn Dickerson was recently awarded the Knight of the Legion of Honor medal for his service in World War Two. Cyndy spoke with Dickerson about the war and the honor surrounding the medal.

Economy
4:30 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside: Health insurance exchanges a key part of Affordable Care Act

Health insurance exchanges will allow insurance buyers to shop thoroughly for the right plan
user striatic Flickr

Health insurance exchanges, a crucial part of the federal Affordable Care Act, will have a great impact on Michigan residents.

To better explain the exchanges, we spoke with Helen Levy. A research associate professor at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

Levy is well-versed in the fine points of the Affordable Care Act.

“A Health insurance exchange is a marketplace designed to bring together people who want to buy insurance and companies that want to sell it to them,” said Levy.

The sites on which the plans will be featured will follow the templates of other marketplace sites.

“It’s going to look something like Travelocity but for health insurance. You can scroll through the policies and see what the different premiums are. The exchanges are intended to include community rating. It’s a key part of making affordable insurance available to everyone,” said Levy.

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Arts & Culture
4:25 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside: Art exhibit addresses Michigan detainee

"Jailed Humanity" draws artists from across the country to spread awareness of Amir Hekmati
http://www.facebook.com/events/362885770472100/ 555 Gallery

Opening this weekend at the 555 Nonprofit Gallery and Studios is “Jailed Humanity: In Support of an American's Quest for Freedom from an Iranian Prison."

The exhibit aims to raise awareness of detainee Amir Hekmati’s situation.

Upon visiting family in Iran, Flint resident Hekmati was detained by the Iranian government and accused of being a spy.

In January, Hekmati was sentenced to death. Two months later, Iran’s Supreme Court found the verdict against Hekmati was incomplete and overturned the death sentence.

To this day, Hekmati sits in an Iranian prison, awaiting a new trial.

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Arts & Culture
4:23 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside: Veteran receives highest honor from French government

Glenn Dickerson displayed his newly awarded medal for Cyndy
Mercedes Mejia

When Glenn Dickerson shakes hands, he feels he is representing every soldier with whom he once fought.

The World War II veteran shook many hands on Tuesday as he was awarded the Knight of the Legion of Honor medal.

“I feel with that medal I represent others’ feats, those who didn’t make it back," said Dickerson.

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Arts & Culture
4:17 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Stateside: An author's love letter to the Midwest

Mike Draper's new book revels in the rich cultural history of the Midwest
raygunsite.com

To Mike Draper, the Midwest is a mystery.

Draper is the author of “The Midwest: God’s Gift to Planet Earth,” a jovial investigation of the region and the major figures who have come from it.

Deemed by those on the coast as “flyover country,” the states of the Midwest receive the portrayal of a land populated only by farmers and fried food junkies.

But the image is a false one.

Without the Midwest, New Yorkers would have no planes in which they could fly across the country.  

“The Midwest is viewed as the American Gothic farmland, which as a region, is only a minority of it. The Midwest has never been a primarily agriculture economy,” said Draper.

When doing his research for the book, interesting Midwesterners seemed to manifest themselves in every corner of the history books through which Draper flipped.  

The Wright Brothers and Henry Ford reinvented the ways Americans could inhabit the world.

Using their literary prowess, authors like Ernest Hemingway and Mark Twain formed new standards for American fiction.

With such rich cultural icons as these, one begins to wonder how anyone could dismiss the Midwest as plain or timid.

It is a question Draper raises throughout “God’s Gift.”  

And with its mysterious beauty, the Midwest provides its answers on every page of his book.

-Cameron Stewart

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Politics & Government
5:13 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Stateside for Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Stateside for Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Distracted driving continues to persist throughout the country. Drivers' seemingly innocent glances at their phones while on the road can have hazardous consequences. To address this issue, we spoke with NPR's Sonari Glinton and Dr. Paul Green, a research professor at U of M’s Driver Interface Group.

Last night, the Detroit Board of Education voted to break their contract with the Education Achievement Authority. Michelle Richard of the Public Sector Consultants and Don Heller, Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University assessed the effects of the Board's decision.

Gambling is big business in Michigan. Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody investigates the lawsuit filed by Attorney General Bill Schutte that challenges the right of the Sault Ste Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians to build a casino in Lansing.

Also on today's show- Harvard Business School professor William George examines the turnaround of the auto industry in America.

Politics & Government
4:27 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Stateside: A big event for the Big Three

Harvard professor William George will participate in the Henry Ford's new event
www.hbs.edu

Being presented this week at the Henry Ford Museum is a case study called “The Big Three Roar Back." The aim of the event, organized by Harvard's Business School, is to examine the comeback of the American auto industry.

One of event's organizers is Harvard Business School professor, William George.

George spoke with Cyndy about the Big Three's revival and other industries of concern.

Listen to the segment in our podcast above.

Transportation
4:11 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Stateside: When the phones endanger the roads

Distracted driving persists throughout drivers across the country
C. Todd Lopez Photo courtesy of U.S. Army

You may want to rethink those seemingly innocent glances at your phone while driving.

Distracted driving continues to be a problem for many of those on the road today.

NPR's Sonari Glinton discussed the relationship many drivers have with their phones and how one’s urge to stay connected should not consume one’s commute.

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Education
3:48 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Stateside: Education Achievement Authority faces loss of Detroit Public Schools

The EAA will await the news concerning the Detroit Board of Education's contract
User Motown31 Creative Commons

Last night, the Detroit Board of Education voted to break their contract and pull out of the Education Achievement Authority.

The Board’s decision will greatly affect the EAA, whose initial goal was to provide educational care to struggling schools throughout Michigan.

Don Heller, Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University, insists the Detroit Schools’ exit will greatly disrupt the EAA.

“If the Detroit Public Schools pull out of the EAA it will be a major blow,” said Heller.

Michelle Richard, who specializes in Educational Policy at Public Sector Consultants, echoed Heller’s remarks.

“My biggest concern is in the short-term and in lending legitimacy to the EAA’s effort, this just causes more confusion. The legislature is currently looking at codifying the EAA and are looking at how they could continue to expand this effort state-wide,” said Richard.

Listen to the audio above or to our podcast to hear more about the state of the EAA.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Politics & Government
5:23 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Today we looked at the economic situation in Detroit.

Daniel Howes, Detroit News business columnist, addressed what needs to be done within the city to ensure its financial stability.

University of California, Berkeley professor, Harley Shaiken analyzed the state of  labor unions today and where they are headed in the future.

For Eli Neuberger,  Old News is great news. The Ann Arbor District Library's project, Old News, archives printed items in its expansive database. Cyndy spoke with Neuberger about the project's goals.

Continuing our look at homelessness in Michigan, we spoke with Greg Nelson about his experience with poverty and how he transcended its debilitations.

Economy
4:51 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Stateside: Detroit's financial predicament

Detroit's handling of its financial situation is of great importance to both the state and country
Mike Russel

Detroit’s financial status is once again on the brink of devastation.

The city’s program management director, William Andrews, recently told the advisory board that the city is facing financial crisis.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes assessed the city’s situation, looking at its aging bureaucracy as a potential area of conflict.

The collapse could occur sooner than expected, said Howes, perhaps as soon as December.

“It could happen as early as next month. What’s hanging out there right now is about $80 million in bond proceeds that the State Treasurer's Office is holding  more reforms within the city. There is hope they can move ahead with some reforms that would release around $30 million by the end of the year. It’s really important to note that time is running out for the city,” said Howes.

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Culture
4:46 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Stateside: Old news put to good use

Old News archives out of print items from around Washtenaw County.
T. Voekler

Retired newspapers are finding a new purpose.

Old News, a project started by the Ann Arbor District Library, archives previously published news items throughout Washtenaw County.

Eli Neiburger works for the AADL, and works primarily on the Old News project.

"Libraries are service industries and we want to help people," said Neiburger.

Old News functions as a resource for anyone curious about past news items and family lineage.

"Our goal is to get people the answers to the questions of their own history," said Neiburger.

For more on Old News, listen to the above podcast.

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Economy
4:41 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Stateside: Labor unions' future reliant on cooperation

Unions such as the UAW are still fulfilling their ultimate purpose
Pobrecito33 Flickr

Labor unions have suffered something of an image crisis over the past decade.

People blame their presence for convoluting many political and economic conversations.

But, according to Harley Shaiken, the unions’ place in society is far from extinct.

Shaiken is a professor of education and geography at University of California, Berkeley.

He addressed the problems currently facing labor unions as well as their past triumphs.

“Overall the public opinion polls are favorable when people are asked if they would join a union,” said Shaiken.

According to Shaiken, the economic gloom of states’ economies cannot entirely be blamed on labor unions.

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Culture
4:37 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Stateside: The men with the bomber planes and the man with the camera

Bill Rosnyai flew a B-17 Bomber in the WWII European Theater.
Brad Ziegler

Flying bomber planes over German and Japanese terrain, Bill Rosnyai and Murray Cotter spent much of World War II in the air.

In observation of Veterans Day, Stateside spoke with Rosnyai, a former navigator on a B-17 in Europe and Cotter, a former bombardier on a B-24 in the Pacific.

Joining them was Brad Ziegler, a freelance photographer who has been photographing Michigan’s World War II veterans, particularly as the vets took special “Honor Flights” to visit the World War II memorial in Washington, D.C.

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Politics & Government
4:34 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Stateside: Keeping an eye on China's elections

Xinhuamen, the "Gate of New China." The formal entrance to Zhongnanhai. The palace serves as the Communist Party's headquarters.
User Peng, Yanan Wikipedia

Communist Party leaders are meeting in Beijing for an important shuffling of China’s leadership, including the selection of a new president.

Tom Watkins is the former state school superintendent and has been closely involved in building ties between Michigan and China. Tonight, he’s flying to Beijing to be present for the selection of China’s new president.

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