Stateside

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Stateside for Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Nov 27, 2012

Michigan State Professor of Economics Charley Ballard spoke with us today. He addressed the state's improving economy and helped clarify the fiscal cliff's implications.

Graduating from college brings with it many things- four years of academic achievement, a degree, and for some, substantial financial debt.

Continuing our student debt conversation we spoke today with Detroit Free Press financial columnist Susan Tompor. Joining us also was Pam Fowler, Executive Director of Financial Aid at the University of Michigan.

Ed Wargin is telling a Great Lakes story through his film photography endeavor, The Fresh Coast Project. We spoke with Wargin about his Project's goals and the joys of shooting in film.

Stateside: Paying off a degree of debt

Nov 27, 2012
Western Michigan University's Main Campus
user TheKuLeR / Wikimedia Commons

Graduating from college brings with it many things -  four years of academic achievement, a degree, and for some... substantial financial debt.

Continuing our student debt conversation we spoke today with Detroit Free Press financial columnist Susan Tompor. Pam Fowler, Executive Director of Financial Aid at the University of Michigan, also joing us.

According to Tompor, one of the primary reasons students fall so deeply into debt is their failure to record the money they borrow.

sushina / flickr

A new report from the United States Commerce Department found that economic recovery is occurring in Michigan. According to the survey, per capita personal income rose in nearly every Michigan county last year.

Charley Ballard, Michigan State University Professor of Economics explained that although improving, Michigan’s economy still has further to go.  

Ballard began by defining the factors of per capita income.

“It’s their wages and salaries. It also included dividends and social security. It doesn’t include Medicare. They add up all of the income of all the people in Michigan and then divide by the number of people,” said Ballard.

Though improved, Michigan is still well below the national average of per capita income.

Stateside: Michigan's shores documented in the Fresh Coast Project

Nov 27, 2012
Ed Wargin

Photographer Ed Wargin is enchanted by the Great Lakes; he endeavors to document all 10,000 miles of their shores with his Fresh Coast Project.

The project's aim is to celebrate the beauty of the Great Lakes through the ephemeral medium of film photography.

"I've realized we often look at the Great Lakes in parts and pieces. The goal of the project is to try to look at the Great Lakes as one story," said Wargin.

Wargin hopes his shots of gleaming sunsets will  inform people of the state's abundant resources and thereby promote their preservation.

Hear Wargin further discuss his Fresh Coast Project on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside for Monday, November 26, 2012

Nov 26, 2012

Today we spoke with Nolan Finley of the Detroit News about Detroit City Council. According to Finley, there is dire need for reform within the Council.

Michigan-born Dana Falconberry makes folk music that is both mystical and enveloping. Falconberry spoke with Cyndy about her latest album, "Leelanau," and how Michigan influences her music.

Though you may not have known, Michigan owns the blueprints of the World Trade Center. Michigan Radio's Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta further explained how this came to be.

Although increasingly expensive, college educations continue to prove valuable. 

Addressing the long-term value of a college education was University of Michigan’s Vice Provost Martha Pollack and Don Heller, Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University.

Stateside: Dana Falconberry's "Leelanau" soundscapes

Nov 26, 2012
Alicia Vega

Listening to Dana Falconberry's lush music, it becomes clear the artist draws inspiration from Michigan's western coast.

We spoke today with Falconberry about her latest record, "Leelanau," and the role that Michigan's landscapes play in her music.

"It's so beautiful up there, it's easy to be inspired by the land," said Falconberry.

With track titles like "Pictured Rocks" and "Sault Ste Marie," Falconberry's latest is in many ways a musical homage to a state beaming with beauty.

Listen to Falconberry's interview and music in our podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Nolan Finley's call for Detroit City Council reform

Nov 26, 2012
Detroit City Council
Detroit City Council / Facebook

Nolan Finley is concerned about Detroit City Council.

In a recent Detroit News editorial, Finley claimed that Detroit Corporate Council Krystal Crittendon “must go.”  

Finley spoke with Cyndy about Detroit’s drastic need to reform its Council.

“The mayor has finally got the message that you have to cooperate or this won’t end well. City Council is still under the delusion that it has power and can escape the consequences of decades of bad management,” said Finley.

user: jdurham / morguefile

Though expensive, the lifetime return of a college education continues to be unequivocal.

On today's show, University of Michigan Vice Provost Martha Pollack and Michigan State University College of Education Dean Don Heller address the long-term value of a college education.

They both say state funding cuts continue to propel tuition increases.

“Our state funding at University of Michigan on a per student basis has declined by 50%,” said Pollack.

Stateside for Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Nov 21, 2012

Thanksgiving is tomorrow and Stateside has it covered.

We spoke with Detroit News's Bill Loomis about the history of Thanksgiving feasts.

Detroit's Thanksgiving Parade has a vibrant history; Author Romie Minor spoke with Cyndy about the parade and its place in American culture.

Author Keith Taylor provided his three winter reading recommendations. Listen to our podcast to discover the titles!

We thank you for listening to Stateside. Have a wonderful weekend and we'll speak again on Monday.

Rebecca Williams / Michigan Radio


With the exception of a few wild selections, the Thanksgiving spreads of today closely resemble those of the 1800’s.


Bill Loomis, author of “Detroit’s Delectable Past,” claimed our ancestors had a taste for animals of considerable size- such as the bear.


During the 19th century, animals were killed specifically for the Thanksgiving meal.


Cuts of chicken, duck, fish, quail and squirrel were served with mounds of squash and other root vegetables.

Stateside: Detroit's historic parade of thanks

Nov 21, 2012
Tony Spina / Wayne State University

On a glinting Thanksgiving morning with sidewalks stuffed with families, the Detroit Parade floats by in a procession of color and sound.

You know the day- the pre-feast anticipation and relief of a  long weekend- these are among the things combining to make the morning special.

For Detroit, America's Thanksgiving Parade has a long tradition of brilliantly beginning the weekend.

Today we spoke with Romie Minor. He is a librarian and archivist at the Detroit Public Library. He wrote a book about the  Detroit's parade called Detroit's Thanksgiving Day Parade, co-authored with his wife Laurie Ann Tamborino.

According to Minor, the parade has existed in various forms since 1924.

Although it faced financial collapse at several points throughout its existence, the parade continues to thrive today.

While many of the floats' themes have evolved over the years, the gleeful expressions of children continue to remain consistent.

“When I look at the photos over the years, you see that look of awe on all the children’s faces. It doesn’t matter which decade, the face expression remains the same and it’s just great. It will be that way tomorrow,” said Minor.

-Cameron Stewart

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Keith Taylor's top three winter reads

Nov 21, 2012
johnsmolens.com

As cold weather begins biting our fingers, reveries of fireside reading become common and lingering.

Keith Taylor writes both poetry and fiction; he coordinates the undergraduate program in creative writing at the University of Michigan and is the poetry editor for Michigan Quarterly Review.

Taylor knows Michigan literature-  so we asked him to compile a list of his three recommended winter reads. 

Stateside for Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Nov 20, 2012

Today we addressed the pressing news surrounding Judge Hathaway. Michigan Radio's Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta spoke with Cyndy about the Judge's future.

A growing number of Chinese students are choosing to study at Michigan universities. We spoke with Peter Briggs, director of MSU’s Office of International Students and Scholars and Jing Cui, an undergrad student at MSU about the relationships between American and international students.

Mark Binelli's new book, "Detroit City is the Place to Be: The Afterlife of an American Metropolis" is a patient analysis of the multifaceted city. We spoke with Mark about some of the greatest Detroit personalities.

And Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith investigated Benton Harbor's recent millage rejection.

larrysphatpage / flickr

An increasing amount of Chinese students are enrolling in American universities.

Because more Chinese students are now graduating from high school than ever before, there exists the demand for collegiate opportunities.

“It’s a strong reflection of the Chinese middle class. There is also a liberalization of U.S. visas to allow Chinese students to come here,” said Peter Briggs.

Briggs directs Michigan State University’s Office of International Students and Scholars.

Sharing her story was study abroad was Jing Cui. An undergrad student at MSU, Jing Cui considered America upon attending a Chinese university for a year.

Stateside for Monday, November 19, 2012

Nov 19, 2012

Nine months after the implementation of Michigan welfare reform, the number of Michigan families receiving state checks plummeted to the lowest level in more than 40 years. We spoke with Michigan Radio's Lester Graham and Ron French of Bridge Magazine about the cuts and their implications.

A lame-duck session for Lansing is in effect. Today, David Eggert talked about potential  for Michigan politics. Eggert writes for MLive and was joined by Michigan Radio's Jack Lessenberry.

Anne Dohrenwend, author of “Coming Around: Parenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender
Kids," spoke with Cyndy about parenting a gay child.  Joining her was Mike Neubecker of the support group PFLAG.

user Penywise / morguefile

Nine months after a Michigan welfare reform was implemented, the number of Michigan families receiving state checks plummeted to the lowest level in more than 40 years.

More than 9,000 Michigan families were removed from cash assistance last fall, a number that has recently grown to 15,000.

Ron French, writer for Bridge Magazine, addressed the cuts.

“Last fall, the legislature reformed welfare in a way that put time limits on welfare recipients. The legislature wanted to enforce a limit of 48 months on welfare recipients. The legislature and governor wanted to move more people to the workforce," said French.

"But what happened is that the Department of Human Services took it a step further and really kicked off more people than would have been otherwise."

Michigan Radio’s Lester Graham noted the effect the cuts had on families’ ability to pay essential bills.

“Suddenly we saw 11,000 families kicked off of cash assistance, which meant they couldn’t pay their utilities or rent,” said Graham.

Stateside: LGBT Parenting

Nov 19, 2012
user Marlith / Flickr

A child's decision to discuss his or her sexuality with a parent is a defining moment.

A parent's reaction can have critical effects on the confidence and health of their child.

Author Anne Dohrenwend addressed the ways one should communicate with a homosexual child.

Her new book, “Coming Around: Parenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Kids,” assesses healthy relationships between parents and their gay children.

Mike Neubecker of PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) also spoke with Cyndy.

Stateside: A growing Big Ten

Nov 19, 2012

The Big Ten Conference will soon include 14 teams.

Michigan Radio's John U. Bacon addressed the conference's decision to bring Maryland and Rutgers into its competitive network.

“On the Michigan chat boards, it is 98% apocalyptic disgust. It should be noted, that is in great contrast to Nebraska joining last year. They are not against expansion, per se,” said Bacon.

The potential financial gains are of great interest to the conference, said Bacon.

“The whole reason why they are doing that is the Big Ten Network’s footprint. This can add up to around $200 million dollars. I can think of no other reason why they would do it,” said Bacon.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Addressing Michigan's lame-duck session

Nov 19, 2012
Michigan's State Capitol in Lansing.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan lawmakers are currently in a "lame-duck" session.

With some politicians nearing the ends of their terms, a mixed sense of delay and progress pervades Lansing.

David Eggert, political contributor for MLive and Michigan Radio’s Jack Lessenberry talked about the typical work ethic of a lame-duck period.

“Some of these folks won’t be coming back, so I think they feel somewhat liberated and also under pressure to get things done,” said Lessenberry.

Stateside for Thursday, November 15, 2012

Nov 15, 2012

Today we investigated health insurance exchanges, an integral part of the Affordable Care Act.

Helping define the exchanges was  Helen Levy, a Research Associate Professor at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

Michigan Radio Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta helped assess the politics behind the new policies.

Mike Draper has Midwest respect. Draper spoke about the region and his book, "The Midwest: God's Gift To Planet Earth."

Opening at 555 Nonprofit Gallery this weekend is "Jailed Humanity: In Support of an American's Quest for Freedom from an Iranian Prison." Talking about the exhibition and her detainee brother was Sarah Hekmati.

Veteran Glenn Dickerson was recently awarded the Knight of the Legion of Honor medal for his service in World War Two. Cyndy spoke with Dickerson about the war and the honor surrounding the medal.

user striatic / Flickr

Health insurance exchanges, a crucial part of the federal Affordable Care Act, will have a great impact on Michigan residents.

To better explain the exchanges, we spoke with Helen Levy. A research associate professor at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

Levy is well-versed in the fine points of the Affordable Care Act.

“A Health insurance exchange is a marketplace designed to bring together people who want to buy insurance and companies that want to sell it to them,” said Levy.

The sites on which the plans will be featured will follow the templates of other marketplace sites.

“It’s going to look something like Travelocity but for health insurance. You can scroll through the policies and see what the different premiums are. The exchanges are intended to include community rating. It’s a key part of making affordable insurance available to everyone,” said Levy.

Stateside: Art exhibit addresses Michigan detainee

Nov 15, 2012
http://www.facebook.com/events/362885770472100/ / 555 Gallery

Opening this weekend at the 555 Nonprofit Gallery and Studios is “Jailed Humanity: In Support of an American's Quest for Freedom from an Iranian Prison."

The exhibit aims to raise awareness of detainee Amir Hekmati’s situation.

Upon visiting family in Iran, Flint resident Hekmati was detained by the Iranian government and accused of being a spy.

In January, Hekmati was sentenced to death. Two months later, Iran’s Supreme Court found the verdict against Hekmati was incomplete and overturned the death sentence.

To this day, Hekmati sits in an Iranian prison, awaiting a new trial.

Stateside: Veteran receives highest honor from French government

Nov 15, 2012
Mercedes Mejia

When Glenn Dickerson shakes hands, he feels he is representing every soldier with whom he once fought.

The World War II veteran shook many hands on Tuesday as he was awarded the Knight of the Legion of Honor medal.

“I feel with that medal I represent others’ feats, those who didn’t make it back," said Dickerson.

Stateside: An author's love letter to the Midwest

Nov 15, 2012
raygunsite.com

To Mike Draper, the Midwest is a mystery.

Draper is the author of “The Midwest: God’s Gift to Planet Earth,” a jovial investigation of the region and the major figures who have come from it.

Deemed by those on the coast as “flyover country,” the states of the Midwest receive the portrayal of a land populated only by farmers and fried food junkies.

But the image is a false one.

Without the Midwest, New Yorkers would have no planes in which they could fly across the country.  

“The Midwest is viewed as the American Gothic farmland, which as a region, is only a minority of it. The Midwest has never been a primarily agriculture economy,” said Draper.

When doing his research for the book, interesting Midwesterners seemed to manifest themselves in every corner of the history books through which Draper flipped.  

The Wright Brothers and Henry Ford reinvented the ways Americans could inhabit the world.

Using their literary prowess, authors like Ernest Hemingway and Mark Twain formed new standards for American fiction.

With such rich cultural icons as these, one begins to wonder how anyone could dismiss the Midwest as plain or timid.

It is a question Draper raises throughout “God’s Gift.”  

And with its mysterious beauty, the Midwest provides its answers on every page of his book.

-Cameron Stewart

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside for Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Nov 14, 2012

Distracted driving continues to persist throughout the country. Drivers' seemingly innocent glances at their phones while on the road can have hazardous consequences. To address this issue, we spoke with NPR's Sonari Glinton and Dr. Paul Green, a research professor at U of M’s Driver Interface Group.

Last night, the Detroit Board of Education voted to break their contract with the Education Achievement Authority. Michelle Richard of the Public Sector Consultants and Don Heller, Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University assessed the effects of the Board's decision.

Gambling is big business in Michigan. Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody investigates the lawsuit filed by Attorney General Bill Schutte that challenges the right of the Sault Ste Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians to build a casino in Lansing.

Also on today's show- Harvard Business School professor William George examines the turnaround of the auto industry in America.

Stateside: A big event for the Big Three

Nov 14, 2012
www.hbs.edu

Being presented this week at the Henry Ford Museum is a case study called “The Big Three Roar Back." The aim of the event, organized by Harvard's Business School, is to examine the comeback of the American auto industry.

One of event's organizers is Harvard Business School professor, William George.

George spoke with Cyndy about the Big Three's revival and other industries of concern.

Listen to the segment in our podcast above.

Stateside: When the phones endanger the roads

Nov 14, 2012
Texting while driving
C. Todd Lopez / Photo courtesy of U.S. Army

You may want to rethink those seemingly innocent glances at your phone while driving.

Distracted driving continues to be a problem for many of those on the road today.

NPR's Sonari Glinton discussed the relationship many drivers have with their phones and how one’s urge to stay connected should not consume one’s commute.

User Motown31 / Creative Commons

Last night, the Detroit Board of Education voted to break their contract and pull out of the Education Achievement Authority.

The Board’s decision will greatly affect the EAA, whose initial goal was to provide educational care to struggling schools throughout Michigan.

Don Heller, Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University, insists the Detroit Schools’ exit will greatly disrupt the EAA.

“If the Detroit Public Schools pull out of the EAA it will be a major blow,” said Heller.

Michelle Richard, who specializes in Educational Policy at Public Sector Consultants, echoed Heller’s remarks.

“My biggest concern is in the short-term and in lending legitimacy to the EAA’s effort, this just causes more confusion. The legislature is currently looking at codifying the EAA and are looking at how they could continue to expand this effort state-wide,” said Richard.

Listen to the audio above or to our podcast to hear more about the state of the EAA.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside for Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Nov 13, 2012

Today we looked at the economic situation in Detroit.

Daniel Howes, Detroit News business columnist, addressed what needs to be done within the city to ensure its financial stability.

University of California, Berkeley professor, Harley Shaiken analyzed the state of  labor unions today and where they are headed in the future.

For Eli Neuberger,  Old News is great news. The Ann Arbor District Library's project, Old News, archives printed items in its expansive database. Cyndy spoke with Neuberger about the project's goals.

Continuing our look at homelessness in Michigan, we spoke with Greg Nelson about his experience with poverty and how he transcended its debilitations.

Stateside: Detroit's financial predicament

Nov 13, 2012
Mike Russel

Detroit’s financial status is once again on the brink of devastation.

The city’s program management director, William Andrews, recently told the advisory board that the city is facing financial crisis.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes assessed the city’s situation, looking at its aging bureaucracy as a potential area of conflict.

The collapse could occur sooner than expected, said Howes, perhaps as soon as December.

“It could happen as early as next month. What’s hanging out there right now is about $80 million in bond proceeds that the State Treasurer's Office is holding  more reforms within the city. There is hope they can move ahead with some reforms that would release around $30 million by the end of the year. It’s really important to note that time is running out for the city,” said Howes.

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