Stateside

Education
4:56 pm
Wed November 28, 2012

Stateside: Improving students' access to higher education

Johnson insists we view all students as potential college candidates
user BES Photos Flickr

Students’ transitions to college are often determined by the rigor of their high school education.

How a student views attending college is often shaped by the adult voices around them.

Today, we spoke with Brandy Johnson and Nathan Daun-Barnett.

Johnson, the Executive Director of the Michigan College Access Network and Barnett, a professor of Higher Education Administration at the University of Buffalo both stressed the importance of an informed body of high school students to better ensure their college attendance.

The Michigan College Access Network’s goal  is to boost the percentage of Michigan residents with post-secondary degrees or credentials to 60% by 2025. According to Johnson, Michigan still has further to go.

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Politics & Government
4:51 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Michigan State Professor of Economics Charley Ballard spoke with us today. He addressed the state's improving economy and helped clarify the fiscal cliff's implications.

Graduating from college brings with it many things- four years of academic achievement, a degree, and for some, substantial financial debt.

Continuing our student debt conversation we spoke today with Detroit Free Press financial columnist Susan Tompor. Joining us also was Pam Fowler, Executive Director of Financial Aid at the University of Michigan.

Ed Wargin is telling a Great Lakes story through his film photography endeavor, The Fresh Coast Project. We spoke with Wargin about his Project's goals and the joys of shooting in film.

Education
4:37 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Stateside: Paying off a degree of debt

For some, attending a college such as Western Michigan University results in massive financial debt
user TheKuLeR Wikimedia Commons

Graduating from college brings with it many things -  four years of academic achievement, a degree, and for some... substantial financial debt.

Continuing our student debt conversation we spoke today with Detroit Free Press financial columnist Susan Tompor. Pam Fowler, Executive Director of Financial Aid at the University of Michigan, also joing us.

According to Tompor, one of the primary reasons students fall so deeply into debt is their failure to record the money they borrow.

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Economy
4:34 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Stateside: Per capita income increases in Michigan, still below national average

Though far from fully repaired, Michigan's economy is improving
sushina flickr

A new report from the United States Commerce Department found that economic recovery is occurring in Michigan. According to the survey, per capita personal income rose in nearly every Michigan county last year.

Charley Ballard, Michigan State University Professor of Economics explained that although improving, Michigan’s economy still has further to go.  

Ballard began by defining the factors of per capita income.

“It’s their wages and salaries. It also included dividends and social security. It doesn’t include Medicare. They add up all of the income of all the people in Michigan and then divide by the number of people,” said Ballard.

Though improved, Michigan is still well below the national average of per capita income.

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Arts & Culture
4:29 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Stateside: Michigan's shores documented in the Fresh Coast Project

Ed Wargin's Fresh Coast Project captures the Great Lakes in all their glowing beauty
Ed Wargin

Photographer Ed Wargin is enchanted by the Great Lakes; he endeavors to document all 10,000 miles of their shores with his Fresh Coast Project.

The project's aim is to celebrate the beauty of the Great Lakes through the ephemeral medium of film photography.

"I've realized we often look at the Great Lakes in parts and pieces. The goal of the project is to try to look at the Great Lakes as one story," said Wargin.

Wargin hopes his shots of gleaming sunsets will  inform people of the state's abundant resources and thereby promote their preservation.

Hear Wargin further discuss his Fresh Coast Project on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Politics & Government
5:32 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Stateside for Monday, November 26, 2012

Stateside for Monday, November 26, 2012

Today we spoke with Nolan Finley of the Detroit News about Detroit City Council. According to Finley, there is dire need for reform within the Council.

Michigan-born Dana Falconberry makes folk music that is both mystical and enveloping. Falconberry spoke with Cyndy about her latest album, "Leelanau," and how Michigan influences her music.

Though you may not have known, Michigan owns the blueprints of the World Trade Center. Michigan Radio's Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta further explained how this came to be.

Although increasingly expensive, college educations continue to prove valuable. 

Addressing the long-term value of a college education was University of Michigan’s Vice Provost Martha Pollack and Don Heller, Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University.

Arts & Culture
3:46 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Stateside: Dana Falconberry's "Leelanau" soundscapes

Dana Falconberry's music draws from the lush landscapes of the Leelanau Peninsula
Alicia Vega

Listening to Dana Falconberry's lush music, it becomes clear the artist draws inspiration from Michigan's western coast.

We spoke today with Falconberry about her latest record, "Leelanau," and the role that Michigan's landscapes play in her music.

"It's so beautiful up there, it's easy to be inspired by the land," said Falconberry.

With track titles like "Pictured Rocks" and "Sault Ste Marie," Falconberry's latest is in many ways a musical homage to a state beaming with beauty.

Listen to Falconberry's interview and music in our podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Politics & Government
3:42 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Stateside: Nolan Finley's call for Detroit City Council reform

Detroit News writer Nolan Finley says Governor Snyder must take control of Detroit's City Council
Detroit City Council Facebook

Nolan Finley is concerned about Detroit City Council.

In a recent Detroit News editorial, Finley claimed that Detroit Corporate Council Krystal Crittendon “must go.”  

Finley spoke with Cyndy about Detroit’s drastic need to reform its Council.

“The mayor has finally got the message that you have to cooperate or this won’t end well. City Council is still under the delusion that it has power and can escape the consequences of decades of bad management,” said Finley.

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Education
3:17 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Stateside: Amidst growing tuition fees, education value remains stable

University of Michigan's tuition growth reached 5.09% said Pollack
user: jdurham morguefile

Though expensive, the lifetime return of a college education continues to be unequivocal.

On today's show, University of Michigan Vice Provost Martha Pollack and Michigan State University College of Education Dean Don Heller address the long-term value of a college education.

They both say state funding cuts continue to propel tuition increases.

“Our state funding at University of Michigan on a per student basis has declined by 50%,” said Pollack.

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Politics & Government
5:05 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Stateside for Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Stateside for Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Thanksgiving is tomorrow and Stateside has it covered.

We spoke with Detroit News's Bill Loomis about the history of Thanksgiving feasts.

Detroit's Thanksgiving Parade has a vibrant history; Author Romie Minor spoke with Cyndy about the parade and its place in American culture.

Author Keith Taylor provided his three winter reading recommendations. Listen to our podcast to discover the titles!

We thank you for listening to Stateside. Have a wonderful weekend and we'll speak again on Monday.

Arts & Culture
4:50 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Stateside: Thanksgiving spreads your great-grandmother would recognize

Turkeys were amongst a vibrant spread of dishes served throughout Thanksgivings of the 1800's
Rebecca Williams Michigan Radio

Cyndy talks with Bill Loomis, author of "Detroit's Delectable Past"

With the exception of a few wild selections, the Thanksgiving spreads of today closely resemble those of the 1800’s.


Bill Loomis, author of “Detroit’s Delectable Past,” claimed our ancestors had a taste for animals of considerable size- such as the bear.


During the 19th century, animals were killed specifically for the Thanksgiving meal.


Cuts of chicken, duck, fish, quail and squirrel were served with mounds of squash and other root vegetables.

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Arts & Culture
3:59 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Stateside: Detroit's historic parade of thanks

Santa holds the key to the city of Detroit before the crowds on Woodward Ave. at the conclusion of the parade (c. 1960)
Tony Spina Wayne State University

Cyndy talks with Romie Minor, author of Detroit's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

On a glinting Thanksgiving morning with sidewalks stuffed with families, the Detroit Parade floats by in a procession of color and sound.

You know the day- the pre-feast anticipation and relief of a  long weekend- these are among the things combining to make the morning special.

For Detroit, America's Thanksgiving Parade has a long tradition of brilliantly beginning the weekend.

Today we spoke with Romie Minor. He is a librarian and archivist at the Detroit Public Library. He wrote a book about the  Detroit's parade called Detroit's Thanksgiving Day Parade, co-authored with his wife Laurie Ann Tamborino.

According to Minor, the parade has existed in various forms since 1924.

Although it faced financial collapse at several points throughout its existence, the parade continues to thrive today.

While many of the floats' themes have evolved over the years, the gleeful expressions of children continue to remain consistent.

“When I look at the photos over the years, you see that look of awe on all the children’s faces. It doesn’t matter which decade, the face expression remains the same and it’s just great. It will be that way tomorrow,” said Minor.

-Cameron Stewart

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Arts & Culture
3:58 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Stateside: Keith Taylor's top three winter reads

"Cold" by John Smolens is one of Taylor's three recommended winter reads
johnsmolens.com

Cyndy talks with Keith Taylor about three of his recommended winter reads

As cold weather begins biting our fingers, reveries of fireside reading become common and lingering.

Keith Taylor writes both poetry and fiction; he coordinates the undergraduate program in creative writing at the University of Michigan and is the poetry editor for Michigan Quarterly Review.

Taylor knows Michigan literature-  so we asked him to compile a list of his three recommended winter reads. 

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Politics & Government
4:54 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Stateside for Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Today we addressed the pressing news surrounding Judge Hathaway. Michigan Radio's Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta spoke with Cyndy about the Judge's future.

A growing number of Chinese students are choosing to study at Michigan universities. We spoke with Peter Briggs, director of MSU’s Office of International Students and Scholars and Jing Cui, an undergrad student at MSU about the relationships between American and international students.

Mark Binelli's new book, "Detroit City is the Place to Be: The Afterlife of an American Metropolis" is a patient analysis of the multifaceted city. We spoke with Mark about some of the greatest Detroit personalities.

And Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith investigated Benton Harbor's recent millage rejection.

Education
4:49 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

Stateside: International students continue to attend Michigan universities

Michigan State University receives a high number of international applicants each fall
larrysphatpage flickr

Peter Briggs of MSU's Office of International Students and Scholars and Jing Cui, an undergrad student at MSU talk with Cynthia Canty.

An increasing amount of Chinese students are enrolling in American universities.

Because more Chinese students are now graduating from high school than ever before, there exists the demand for collegiate opportunities.

“It’s a strong reflection of the Chinese middle class. There is also a liberalization of U.S. visas to allow Chinese students to come here,” said Peter Briggs.

Briggs directs Michigan State University’s Office of International Students and Scholars.

Sharing her story was study abroad was Jing Cui. An undergrad student at MSU, Jing Cui considered America upon attending a Chinese university for a year.

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Politics & Government
4:52 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside for Monday, November 19, 2012

Stateside for Monday, November 19th, 2012

Nine months after the implementation of Michigan welfare reform, the number of Michigan families receiving state checks plummeted to the lowest level in more than 40 years. We spoke with Michigan Radio's Lester Graham and Ron French of Bridge Magazine about the cuts and their implications.

A lame-duck session for Lansing is in effect. Today, David Eggert talked about potential  for Michigan politics. Eggert writes for MLive and was joined by Michigan Radio's Jack Lessenberry.

Anne Dohrenwend, author of “Coming Around: Parenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender
Kids," spoke with Cyndy about parenting a gay child.  Joining her was Mike Neubecker of the support group PFLAG.

Economy
4:32 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: Welfare benefit reform takes effect, thousands in Michigan are impacted

Michigan's welfare reform impacted nearly 15,000 families
user Penywise morguefile

Stateside talks with Ron French and Lester Graham about changes to welfare in Michigan.

Nine months after a Michigan welfare reform was implemented, the number of Michigan families receiving state checks plummeted to the lowest level in more than 40 years.

More than 9,000 Michigan families were removed from cash assistance last fall, a number that has recently grown to 15,000.

Ron French, writer for Bridge Magazine, addressed the cuts.

“Last fall, the legislature reformed welfare in a way that put time limits on welfare recipients. The legislature wanted to enforce a limit of 48 months on welfare recipients. The legislature and governor wanted to move more people to the workforce," said French.

"But what happened is that the Department of Human Services took it a step further and really kicked off more people than would have been otherwise."

Michigan Radio’s Lester Graham noted the effect the cuts had on families’ ability to pay essential bills.

“Suddenly we saw 11,000 families kicked off of cash assistance, which meant they couldn’t pay their utilities or rent,” said Graham.

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Health
4:11 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: LGBT Parenting

A healthy relationship with one's gay child is of great importance
user Marlith Flickr

A child's decision to discuss his or her sexuality with a parent is a defining moment.

A parent's reaction can have critical effects on the confidence and health of their child.

Author Anne Dohrenwend addressed the ways one should communicate with a homosexual child.

Her new book, “Coming Around: Parenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Kids,” assesses healthy relationships between parents and their gay children.

Mike Neubecker of PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) also spoke with Cyndy.

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Sports
3:37 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: A growing Big Ten

The Big Ten Conference now includes Maryland and Rutgers

The Big Ten Conference will soon include 14 teams.

Michigan Radio's John U. Bacon addressed the conference's decision to bring Maryland and Rutgers into its competitive network.

“On the Michigan chat boards, it is 98% apocalyptic disgust. It should be noted, that is in great contrast to Nebraska joining last year. They are not against expansion, per se,” said Bacon.

The potential financial gains are of great interest to the conference, said Bacon.

“The whole reason why they are doing that is the Big Ten Network’s footprint. This can add up to around $200 million dollars. I can think of no other reason why they would do it,” said Bacon.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Politics & Government
3:32 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Stateside: Addressing Michigan's lame-duck session

Though in a lame-duck session, there exists the possibility for action in the capitol
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Michigan lawmakers are currently in a "lame-duck" session.

With some politicians nearing the ends of their terms, a mixed sense of delay and progress pervades Lansing.

David Eggert, political contributor for MLive and Michigan Radio’s Jack Lessenberry talked about the typical work ethic of a lame-duck period.

“Some of these folks won’t be coming back, so I think they feel somewhat liberated and also under pressure to get things done,” said Lessenberry.

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