Stateside

this is the correct one

www.michiganadvantage.org

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Are there important jobs going begging in Michigan?

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette.
Bill Schuette / Facebook.com

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

When you hear the term "human trafficking" and let yourself think about what that entails, you might think of it as something that happens overseas, perhaps in exotic places.

U.S. ICE

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

For the very first time in more years than just about anyone can remember, things seem to be lining up in favor of immigration reform.

Ebony Magazine

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Rosa Parks.

She was small in stature, quiet, humble, and yet a woman who made a giant mark on the pages of American history. A woman hailed as a true icon of the civil rights movement.

Her deliberate, well-thought-out act of civil disobedience galvanized the struggle for civil rights, not only here in America, but around the world.

A year later, in 1956, Rosa Parks and her husband Raymond moved to Detroit where she lived until her death in 2005.

We take a closer look at the life and legacy of Rosa Parks with Wayne State University Professor of History, Danielle McGuire.

Her book is entitled "At The Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance: A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power."

She joined us now from the Rosa Parks celebration, the National Day of Courage, at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn.

Today marks the 100th birthday of Civil Rights leader, Rosa Parks. Cyndy talks with history professor Danielle McGuire about the legacy of Rosa Parks life.

And we'll take you inside the bus where Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man in Montgomery Alabama. That simple act of courage helped spark the civil rights movement in the U.S.

And, with immigration reform high on the agenda in Washington D.C., we take a look at just what makes people think the way they do about undocumented workers.

First up on the show, will the State of Michigan expand its Medicaid coverage?

That's the question on the front burner at the Governor's office these days as he prepares to unveil his new budget to the Legislature this week. We talk with reporter Kathleen Gray from the Detroit Free Press about the Governor's upcoming decision.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

RosaParks.com

The following is a summary of an audio segment. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Today marks the 100th birthday of civil rights leader, Rosa Parks.

Back in 1955, the south was segregated.

And on December 1 of that year, a 42-year old seamstress refused to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama and was arrested for it.

That simple act of courage helped spark the civil rights movement in America.

Today, that bus lives in the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn.

Stateside’s Emily Fox takes us on a tour of the exhibit where she talked with museum visitors and Christian Overland, the executive Vice President of the Henry Ford Museum.

Michigan Sheriffs' Association

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

There has been a change of heart, or at least of policy, at Michigan's Secretary of State's office.

Word came down late last week that thousands of children of undocumented immigrants in Michigan will now be eligible for a driver's license or official state ID.

This was quite a reversal of the stand that had been taken by Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson who now says a review of new federal guidelines convinced her to change the policy.

Cyndy spoke with Miriam Aukerman, staff attorney with the ACLU of Michigan, to talk about the change of policy.

Thomas Anderson / Flickr

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Is the State of Michigan going to expand its Medicaid coverage? That's the question on the front burner at the Governor's office these days as he prepares to unveil his new budget to the Legislature this week.

Cyndy spoke with Detroit Free Press reporter Kathleen Gray who helped break down the Medicaid program in the state and talked to us about the pros and cons of expanding Medicaid coverage to another half a million people.

The Affordable Care Act will assist states in expanding their Medicaid eligibility limits for adults to 133 percent of the Federal Poverty Level, (that's and income of about $14,860 per year for one person).

Stateside: ACLU files suit against right-to-work legislation

Jan 31, 2013
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Today the ACLU filed a lawsuit against right-to-work legislation.

Michigan Public Radio's Jake Neher spoke with Cyndy about the suit and its potential implications.

“They say for about four hours on the day right-to-work started moving through the legislature, the doors were closed. They say that that violates the Michigan Constitution which guarantees the residents of Michigan the right to assemble. There were people from the public inside at the time, they just weren’t letting in others," said Neher.

According to Neher, people across the state feel as if their voices are underrepresented.

“The people that brought this bill up say that they’re concerned that a win-or-take-all system for votes leaves people in certain parts of the state without a voice,” said Neher.

Stateside for Thursday, January 31, 2013

Jan 31, 2013

Sandra Bernhard is appearing at The Ark in Ann Arbor this Friday and Saturday. We spoke with Bernhard about growing up in Michigan and her overall career.

We discussed Super Bowl advertisements with Mike Bernacchi and Bob Kolt.

Michigan Public Radio's Jake Neher provided a look at Michigan legislation with a specific focus on right-to-work.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

wikimedia commons

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish humanitarian credited with saving tens of thousands of Jews during World War II.

To Me There’s No Other Choice,” the exhibition currently at the University of Michigan, celebrates Wallenberg’s achievements and spirit.

Ingrid Carlberg will be among the presenters at the exhibition. Carlberg is the author of “There is a room  waiting for you here.”

Today Carlberg spoke with Cyndy about Wallenberg’s history.

“It was some kind of a coincidence. He was a businessman; he was importing groceries from Hungary. When the Germans marched into Hungary in the spring of 1944, Raoul Wallenberg was alarmed by what was going on. But actually the initiative to go to Budapest and lead a rescue mission came from the American government,” said Carlberg.

Stateside: A story slam competition for entrepreneurs

Jan 30, 2013
http://vimeo.com/entreslam

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Tired of giving the same pitches in the same offices?

Do you have a great idea but lack the environment in which to present it?

Then try Entre-SLAM!

Stateside: Local funding assessed by Michigan Public Policy Survey

Jan 30, 2013
http://www.fordschool.umich.edu/news/?news_id=548

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

One of the major challenges local leaders face is providing services amidst dwindling budgets.

Today we spoke with Tom Ivacko from the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy [CLOSUP] about Michigan’s local services.

“79% of Michigan’s local government leaders told us that, even after the cuts they’ve been making, they’re still satisfied with the overall package of services they deliver,” said Ivacko.

Ivacko noted, however, that many leaders think their citizens remain satisfied.

“We asked local leaders how satisfied their citizens are and they think their citizens are pretty satisfied with the packages today.”

Stateside for Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Jan 30, 2013

Today we spoke with author Ingrid Carlberg about the legacy of Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat credited with saving thousands of Jews in WWII.

Are you an entrepreneur? Heard of Entre-SLAM? We spoke with creators Jeannie Ballew and Christa Chambers-Price and host Al McWilliams about the storytelling competitions.

Tom Ivacko spoke with Cyndy about local leaders and the challenges they could face.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: An app for that ancient manuscript

Jan 29, 2013
[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

There is now an app for reading an ancient text.

The Papyrus App “Picture it: EP” allows one to browse the pages of the oldest existing manuscript of the letters of St. Paul.

Professor Arthur Verhoogt, Associate Professor of Papyrology and Greek at the University of Michigan helped design the app.

“The text is the most ancient manuscript of the letters of Saint Paul that exist. It dates to about [the year] 200,” said Verhoogt.

The texts are kept in a secure vault.

Stateside for Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Jan 29, 2013

Today we discussed Flint's financial status with emergency financial manager Ed Kurtz.

Professor Arthur Verhoogt discussed an iPhone app that allows you to read Epistles of Paul.

We discussed skiing with Mickey McWilliams, the Executive Director of the Michigan Snowsports Industries Association.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Changes to tax refunds may come as a surprise to some

Jan 29, 2013
wikimedia commons

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

For those who have not yet completed your 2012 tax returns- brace yourselves.

In 2011 Governor Snyder signed a tax overhaul package that included $1.4 billion  in additional income taxes and $1.7 billion in business tax cuts.

Stateside for Monday, January 28, 2013

Jan 28, 2013

Today, Roland Zullo of the Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and Economy at the University of Michigan and Vincent Vernuccio of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy spoke about future right-to-work legislation.

Detroit Free Press journalist Jim Schaeffer provided Stateside with an update on Kwame Kilpatrick's trial.

Professor Rosina Bierbaum contributed recently to the National Climate Assessment. We spoke with Bierbaum about the Assessment and its findings.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Right-to-work legislation takes effect on March 27

Jan 28, 2013
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

On March 27, Michigan will become the 24th state to adopt right-to-work legislation.

Roland Zullo of the Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and Economy at the University of Michigan and Vincent Vernuccio of The Mackinac Center for Public Policy spoke with Cyndy today about the legislation.

Stateside: Scientists draft a National Climate Assessment

Jan 28, 2013
Tart cherries, the main cherry crop in Michigan.
Emily Fox / Michigan Radio

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

More than 240 scientists contributed to a new draft report of the National Climate Assessment. The report addresses the country’s changing climate and is the third federal climate review since 2000.

Stateside for Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Jan 23, 2013

Today we spoke with Devon Akmon about this weekend's Arab Film Festival in Dearborn.

And Michigan Radio's Jennifer Guerra and Dustin Dwyer are investigating Michigan's education system for our State of Opportunity project. They spoke today with Cyndy about early childhood education.

Be sure to catch Dwyer's documentary, which airs tomorrow at 3 p.m, on Michigan Radio.

We also spoke with two Reverends about shelters and their vital functions in the winter.

Listen to these stories and more on today's Stateside.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Documenting a region in flux at the Arab Film Festival

Jan 23, 2013
http://www.half-revolution.com/pictures.html

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

The 2013 Arab Film Festival opens Thursday in Dearborn.

Eight films will be screened at the Arab American National Museum.

Jane M Sawyer / morgue file

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Governor Snyder announced his plan to increase funding for early childhood education during last week’s State of the State.

Michigan Radio’s Jennifer Guerra and Dustin Dwyer are researching education in Michigan through the State of Opportunity project.

They spoke with Cyndy today about the benefits of early childhood education.

According to Guerra, there were waves of both skepticism and excitement after Gov. Snyder talked about early childhood education in his State of the State address.

Stateside: Fending off bitter temperatures with shelters

Jan 23, 2013
Homeless man
SamPac / creative commons

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

During these frigid weeks the warmth of a home is invaluable.

But for the homeless, these winter conditions pose life-threatening challenges.

Reverend Chico Daniels, president and chief executive of Mel Trotter Ministries and Cass Community Social Services  executive director, Reverend Faith Fowler, spoke with Cyndy about the necessity of homeless shelters in the winter.

“In the Cass Corridor we have a warming center for 50 homeless women and children. Beyond that we have two regular shelters and some transitional housing,” said Fowler.

Rick Pluta / Michigan Public Radio

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Among the flood of bills passed in the waning days of 2012 came House Bill 5711.

The bill was signed by Gov. Snyder last month and became law (Public Act 499 of 2012).

Dr. Lisa Hope Harris Assistant Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the University of Michigan spoke with Cyndy about the new law and its implications for the state.

“There are four components to the new law. The first is that health centers that provide 120 or more surgical abortions per year and advertise those abortions be licensed as free-standing surgical centers. The law does include waivers… Clinics will very likely be able to comply with this regulation. That means that women are unlikely to be directly affected by the component of the new law.”

Emily Fox / Michigan Radio

When someone from out of town travels to Detroit, the usual destinations might be the Fox Theater for a concert, or Comerica Park for a Tiger’s game. But how do you explore the city on a deeper level without the double decker busses and big tour companies that many big cities have?

When Hostel Detroit opened its doors in April of 2011, its mission was to give its guests a behind the scenes look of the city and take visitors to places that would otherwise be overlooked.

Stateside for Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Jan 22, 2013

Today is the 40th Anniversary of Roe Versus Wade. That landmark decision made access to abortion services a federal constitutional right, rather than a matter of state-by-state policy.

Dr. Lisa Hope Harris spoke with Cyndy today about Michigan Bill 5711 and how it could affect the state.

Also, John Bebow, president and chief executive of the Center for Michigan and Amber Toth,  the outreach director for the Center for Michigan, spoke with Cyndy about Center's education report released today.

Listen to these stories and more on today's podcast.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Study surveys the state of education in Michigan

Jan 22, 2013
http://thecenterformichigan.net/

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio file.

A recent study called “The Public’s Agenda for Public Education” surveyed more than 5,000 Michigan residents to learn how to best improve public education.

John Bebow, president and chief executive of the Center for Michigan and Amber Toth, outreach director for the Center for Michigan, were both involved in the study.

They spoke today with Cyndy about the survey and the state’s future goals for education reform.

“Those who most need that economic ladder that a great education provides, are feeling least well served by today’s system,” said Bebow.

One student with whom Bebow spoke was using dated textbooks.

“We had a student in a community conversation say, ‘my government textbook says Ronald Reagan was the last president.’ We had other people at the opposite end of the spectrum concerned about how we spend money. There are so many concerns expressed. This survey is by no means a lambasting of the education service industry. People are concerned…” said Bebow.

Stateside for Monday, January 21, 2013

Jan 21, 2013

Today we spoke with Jocelyn Benson.

Her group, Military Spouses of Michigan, marched in President Obama's inaugural parade.

Gleaves Whitney provided a history of second inaugural addresses. Guess who gave the shortest.

And Kevin Hofmann spoke with us today about growing up biracial in America.

Listen to these stories and more on today's Stateside.

Stateside: Author Kevin Hofmann on growing up as a biracial child

Jan 21, 2013
http://www.kevinhofmann.com/

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

One very clear aspect of President Barack Obama's story is that he grew up biracial in America.

His mother was from Kansas. His father was Kenyan.

Author Kevin Hofmann grew up in a similar environment.  

He was born in 1967 to a white mother and a black father, just two and a half weeks after the Detroit riots.

He lived in foster care before being adopted by a white family, where he became the fourth of their three children.

Hofmann’s memoir is entitled "Growing Up Black in White."

On “Stateside” today he recalled his adoption experience.

“They had approached the adoption agency and said we want to adopt. They only qualified at that time for what was called ‘hard-to-place’ kids. Back in 1967 and in some places today, biracial children are considered hard-to-place.  So that’s how I came to them. My dad was an associate pastor at a large Lutheran church in Dearborn. Much to our dismay, the church was very vocal about disapproving of having this biracial child in their congregation."

Pages