Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Jodi Westrick

There are big differences between the state House and Senate on what to do next about the budget crisis facing Detroit Public Schools. 

The district needs a massive influx of state aid to stay open next school year. DPS interim superintendent Alycia Meriweather joined Cynthia Canty on today’s Stateside to explain how she hopes to elevate the quality of education for all Detroit public school students.

Terrance Heath/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Are you unable to resist making judgments about the person who makes a grammar mistake?

Ah, wait till you hear about some interesting new research from the University of Michigan.

It gives us some insight into the personality of the critic.

Robin Queen is professor and chair of the Linguistics Department at the University of Michigan and co-author of the new study along with Julie E. Boland, professor of psychology and linguistics. 

Stateside went on the road for a live show from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit on Thursday, May 12, 2016.

You can watch the live broadcast below as host Cynthia Canty interviews several guests, including:

Why a 36-year-old Michigan oil spill still matters today

May 11, 2016
flickr user mtsn/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A Michigan oil spill is still bringing in new questions, even after its events took place over 30 years ago.

It was around 1980 when Canadian oil transport company Enbridge leaked five barrels of oil into the Hiawatha National Forest. However, they were only able to clean up four of the barrels, leaving the area contaminated to this day.

The same company owns 63-year-old pipelines that run under the Straits of Mackinac, causing concern over the safety of Michigan's shorelines.

Detroit Free Press reporter Keith Matheny joined Cynthia Canty on Stateside to understand why this spill still matters today.

Flickr user anderfhart/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It's been 20 years since the Telecommunications Act of 1996 was passed during the Clinton administration, and the TV and radio industry claims to still feels its effects.

The legislation sparked public controversy because of the changes it brought to broadcasting, having introduced media cross-ownership and being the first update in government policies for communications in over 60 years. Today, smaller, independent programmers continue to compete with growing media giants in securing a hold on the market.

State lawmakers at odds over best DPS rescue package

May 11, 2016
Sen. Goeff Hansen, R-Hart, speaks to reporters on the Senate floor after the Senate passed Senate Bills 710, 711, and 819 - 822, measures that would reform Detroit's public schools.
senatorgoeffhansen.com

Michigan lawmakers are at odds over the best rescue package for Detroit Public Schools, including one plan that could leave the district $80 million in debt by September.

A new memo from State Treasurer Nick Khouri predicts a dark future for DPS if an agreement cannot be reached among lawmakers, with teachers missing paychecks and the district going severely into debt.

flickr user volkspider / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Does a typo or grammatical error really bug you?

Are you unable to resist making judgments about the person who committed that linguistic faux pas?

Well, some interesting new research from the University of Michigan might just teach you a thing or two about yourself. 

Robin Queen is professor and chair of the Linguistics Department at U of M. Queen joined Cynthia Canty on Stateside to offer some insight into the personality of the critic. 

flickr user mtsn/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

There are some new questions bubbling up concerning a decades-old oil spill in the Upper Peninsula.

Around 1980, Canadian oil transport company Enbridge discovered its Line 5 oil pipeline had sprung a leak and spilled an estimated five barrels of oil in the Hiawatha National Forest.

Yes, that’s the same Line 5 whose twin pipelines run under the Straits of Mackinac.

Senators Jim Stamas and Jim Ananich at a hearing on the Flint water health emergency with local officials and members of the public at the University of Michigan
senatorjimstamas.com / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The legislative committee in charge of examining what went wrong with the Flint water crisis has concluded.

When Midland Republican Sen. Jim Stamas was appointed chairman, he promised to take testimony on the mistakes that led to the Flint water disaster "at all levels of government,"and to ensure that something like this never happens again. 

However, neither Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder nor any of the former emergency managers in charge of the city of Flint were called to testify. 

The Asian Tiger Mosquito is a carrier of Zika virus
flicker user coniferconifer / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The state of Michigan is beginning diagnostic testing for three viral diseases: Zika, dengue, and chikungunya.

Each of these is carried by mosquitos, which many Michiganders know are all too common in the summertime. 

Dr. Eden Wells, the chief medical executive for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, joined Stateside to tell us more about the testing and how concerned Michiganders should be.

Former altar girl pens chapbook on clerical sexual abuse

May 10, 2016
Chapbook cover for "The Witness"
Kelly Fordon

Writer and poet Kelly Fordon grew up as a Catholic altar girl in the 1970s, and has published The Witness, a chapbook centered around sexual abuse by Catholic priests.

Chapbooks are used by poets to focus on a single theme or topic. 

Fordon never expected to write against the Catholic Church, but believes that people shouldn't be so quick to defend priests accused of abuse. Fordon joined Cynthia Canty on today's Stateside to discuss The Witness.

flickr user Ted Eytan / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

"What bathrooms can transgendered people use?" has become a hot-button question not only in Michigan, but across the United States.

Public comments pour in as the Michigan Board of Education continues to draft its voluntary guidelines to assist schools in addressing the needs of their LGBTQ students.

flickr user amboo who? / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Gender identity has become a big issue in the public discourse over the last few years. There has been a heated debate over legislation involving so-called "bathroom bills" and others involving the fight for legal protections for members of the LGBTQ community.

Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom are saying that Britain has a long way to go before transgender people achieve equality. Some MPs are seeking to follow the Republic of Ireland's lead and pass laws that would allow people to declare which gender they are, regardless of what doctors or anyone else says.

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero has not spoken about why Lansing's former city attorney Janene McIntyre resigned, nor why she was given $160,000 in salary and accrued benefits upon doing so.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There are still unanswered questions and a growing pile of legal bills swirling around the sudden resignation of Lansing's former city attorney.

Janene McIntyre resigned March 4, but was still paid $160,000 in salary and accrued benefits. Now legal costs related to the separation are mounting.

In the meantime, neither McIntyre nor Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero will say why she left and why she was given such a generous payout. 

Laura Swanson

It’s hard not to picture the movie Taken when someone says “human trafficking” – the women lured into a Frenchman’s car and Liam Neeson’s ensuing action scenes.

But filmmaker Laura Swanson said that narrow idea of what human trafficking encompasses is misleading.

“Certainly that does happen, but that’s not the majority of the cases,” Swanson said. “And I think people really need to start reframing the ways in which they see human trafficking so that we can amend our laws and legal system to accompany what we need to do to get resources and to provide the best support for victims and survivors.”

Swanson’s documentary film Break the Chain aims to do just that – to reframe how we understand human trafficking.

Laura Swanson

When Ingham County Prosecutor Stuart Dunnings III was charged with a wide range of prostitution-related crimes, it managed to refocus attention on sex crimes and human trafficking in Michigan.  Victims of these crimes include people forced to sell their bodies for sex and people used for cheap labor.  

Break the Chain, a new documentary on human trafficking in Michigan, premiers next month. 

Filmmaker Laura Swanson and human trafficking survivor Debbie joined Cynthia Canty on today's Stateside.

 

Sen. Gary Peters joined Cynthia Canty in the studio for today's "Stateside"
Mercedes Mejia

There are some important issues that seem to be mired in Republican resistance on Capitol Hill, federal aid for Flint, and hearings on a new Justice for the United States Supreme Court among them.

Senator Gary Peters, D-Mich., joined Cynthia Canty on today's Stateside to talk about the latest developments and what it might take to get these efforts running through the Senate.

computer screen
Ryan Grimes

The Lapeer City Police Department now has a designated area in its parking lot for internet sale exchanges. 

The area is well-lit and under video surveillance, giving people a safe, neutral place to conduct an exchange. 

Lapeer Police Chief Todd Alexander sat down with Stateside's Cynthia Canty to talk about the practice and offer some advice to those looking to conduct internet purchase exchanges. 

Detroit teachers want a forensic audit, so they held a lemonade stand to raise money and public awareness at Detroit's Eastern Market this weekend.
flickr user Rob Bertholf / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Detroit Public Schools has been controlled by the state since 2009. 

Yet, the latest emergency manager says without an infusion of cash from the state, the district won't be able to meet its financial obligations after June 30. 

Michael Byers introduces his English 346 class.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Some say you can mark the day the “golden age of radio” ended.

CBS Radio aired the final episode of the radio drama Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar at 6:35 p.m. on September 30th, 1962.

(You can find that last episode here.)

One English teacher at the University of Michigan says there’s a lot to learn from that era.

Mexican and U.S. flags
Flickr user Ken Bosma

Throughout this year's presidential campaigns, there's been a lot of talk about immigration in this country. We've heard proposals ranging from reform that would be a roadmap to citizenship, to building a wall between the United States and Mexico.

We've had immigration arguments for a long time, about as long as the U.S. has been a country, and these debates always escalate when the economy takes a downturn. 

When there are labor shortages, we turn to Mexico and encourage immigration. But the moment the economy tanks, we want to send those workers packing back to Mexico. 

prison cells
Thomas Hawk / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

There's a category in which Michigan beats countries like China, Russia, Thailand, Cuba and Iran. Michigan imprisons its citizens at a far higher rate.

And Michigan is actually below the national average. States such as Louisiana, Georgia, Texas and Mississippi imprison as many as one out of every 100 residents. 

The U.S. turns to incarceration much more readily than the rest of the world. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Mojito recipe:

  • 2 sprigs of mint
  • 1 oz. simple syrup 
  • 2 oz. white rum
  • 1/2 lime (quartered)
  • club soda

Directions:

Strip the leaves from one sprig of mint. Place in shaker cup. Put lime quarters on top of mint. Muddle. (Putting the limes on top of the mint helps prevent bruising the mint which causes it to be bitter.) Add simple syrup and rum. Shake. Strain into high ball glass filled with ice. Add club soda until filled. Garnish with other sprig of mint.

Donald Trump
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

The Republicans have one candidate left standing for the party's presidential nomination.

Senator Ted Cruz and Governor John Kasich both suspended their campaigns this week, leaving Donald Trump as the presumptive nominee.

Betsey Stevenson is a co-author on the study
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Last month the New York Times published a piece entitled Equality in Marriage Grows, and So Does Class Divide

It reveals whom we choose to marry, generally, has changed over the decades and now it's more often a marriage of equals rather than a bread-winner marrying a homemaker. 

Crowd waits to hear President Obama speak in Flint, Michigan.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Governor Rick Snyder stepped before a crowd of thousands of Flint residents Wednesday in advance of President Obama's speech at Northwestern High School.

The reaction was not warm. 

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joins us to talk about what it will take to end the free-for-all of political games and blame-shifting in the ongoing water crisis. 

Emails released by the governor's office indicate that Michigan State Police are monitoring social media for threats against public officials.
flickr user Glen Schaillie / HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

Emails recently released by Gov. Rick Snyder's office indicated that Michigan State Police were aware that a Copper City man made a potentially threatening Facebook post against Snyder over the Flint water crisis. 

The Flint Journal reports that a state police senior intelligence analyst alerted commanders about the post. The man who wrote the post was on probation after being involved in a 12-hour armed standoff with police.

There was an effort to charge the man with violating his probation, but a judge ultimately decided not to move ahead with the violation. 

pixabay user cocoparisienne / Public Domain

University of Michigan researchers are trying to figure out what exactly it takes to get people to care about climate change. Their study is published in Nature Climate Change

What they found seems to refute the popular line of thinking that culture is the biggest factor in whether we care and are willing to do something about climate change.

Michigan House of Representatives
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

It took 15 hours and an all-nighter, but the state House narrowly managed to approve a package of six bills aimed at fixing the Detroit Public Schools. 

Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta sit down with us today to talk about the bills, and about how the House and Senate have different views about how to keep DPS doors open. 

From top left clockwise: Evan Murphy, Donaver Cricket, Riley O'Brien, Devyn Farries
Michigan Radio

The issues facing transgender people have received a lot of attention lately. This is due, in large part, to the "bathroom bills" that have been proposed in state and local governments.

Michigan is one of those states with a transgender bathroom bill in the works that would require transgender individuals to only use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their birth sex, unless they have written consent from a parent or guardian.

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