WUOMFM

takata

Key Safety Systems
Key Safety Systems

Takata Corp., the Japanese air bag maker embroiled in a massive global recall linked to at least 22 deaths, said Thursday that its president has resigned now that its acquisition by U.S. mobility safety company Key Safety Systems has been completed.

Takata’s president, Shigehisa Takada, said in a statement that as of Wednesday he was succeeded by Yoichiro Nomura, its chief financial officer.

The State of the Takata Airbags

Michigan and 23 other states have settled their lawsuit against airbag maker Takata. 

But the states aren't going to try to collect the money. 

Takata is going bankrupt, so it has limited money for fines, paying automakers for recalls, and compensating victims. 

The states won't go after the $650 million settlement to protect the funds that are available for victims. Twenty-two people have been killed and hundreds of people have been injured with the defective Takata airbags in their vehicles deployed with too much force, spraying them with metal fragments.

The State of the Takata Airbags

The largest automotive recall in history continues, and millions of cars with potentially deadly airbags are still on the road.

A federally appointed independent monitor overseeing the recall in the U.S. just issued a new report, entitled "The State of the Takata Air Bag Recalls."  You can find a link to that report here.

But first, a warning about that report if you're at all squeamish. 

The monitor, John Buretta, didn't hold back when describing the gruesome injuries of the 13 (now 14) known victims killed in the U.S. when the Takata airbags in their cars exploded, sending shards of metal at high speeds towards them.

wikipedia

Honda is stepping up its effort to get some of the most dangerous recalled cars in the country repaired.

Tests have shown that the early-issue Takata airbags in these vehicles have up to a 50% chance of exploding in the face of the driver in a crash:

\
NHTSA

DETROIT - Attorneys for people suing air bag maker Takata and five automakers say the car companies knew that the company's products were dangerous yet continued to use them for years because they were inexpensive.

The allegations against Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Ford and BMW were made in a document filed Monday with a federal court in Miami. The court is handling pretrial evidence-gathering in dozens of lawsuits against Takata and the automakers. The document says the allegations are partly based on auto company documents.

A deployed airbag.
Bee Forks / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The company responsible for selling defective airbags has pleaded guilty to a federal fraud charge.

At a press conference in Detroit, Sandra Moser with the U.S. Department of Justice said Takata willfully manipulated test data to make it look as if its airbags were safe, and sold them to automakers intentionally.

“Takata was supposed to be selling products that save lives,” Moser said. “Not pushing into the marketplace products increase the risk of harm to consumers."

\
NHTSA

Every recall is a safety recall, as one of my favorite auto industry analysts, Michelle Krebs of Autotrader says.

But there is a lot of recall fatigue out there. And it's dangerous. Autotrader's recent survey finds that 40% of people are ignoring recalls because they think the recall is "not important."

So let's cut through that recall fatigue right now. 

The largest recall in automotive history just got bigger.

General Motors and Ford Motor Company this week recalled nearly four million cars with passenger-side Takata airbags.

Takata airbags can inflate with too much force, especially if the cars have been driven in hot, humid areas for a long time. 

GM issued the recall of "certain 2007-2011 vehicles" grudgingly. The automaker believes its designs protect the airbags from heat and moisture. From its statement:  

A deployed airbag.
Bee Forks / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Automakers have added another 12 million cars to a massive recall involving defective airbags.

Takata-made airbags can inflate with too much force and explode. Shrapnel from the devices has killed 13 people, 10 of those in the United States. More than 100 people have been injured.

The total number recalled over the defect is now about 36 million cars in the U.S. and 70 million globally. 

Twelve of the fatal accidents have occurred in Honda vehicles. One death occurred in a Ford pickup in Georgia in December, 2015.

deployed front airbags
Flickr user Mic / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

There have been at least eight people killed in accidents related to defective airbags made by Takata. The potential number of vehicles affected by these Takata air bags has been boosted to more than 32 million, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

But the watchdogs at NHTSA are keeping a wary eye on another safety issue brewing with airbags. What happens when airbags age?

The average age of vehicles on the road is more than 11 years old, and according to auto journalist and publisher of TheDetroitBureau.com Paul Eisenstein that's the oldest average age we've ever experienced.  

Robert Donovan / Flickr

DETROIT (AP) - Automakers and governments are releasing the models covered by a massive expansion of a Takata air bag recall announced last week.

deployed airbag
Dimland

Honda is expanding a recall of cars with Takata airbags that have the potential to explode.

Six people have been killed by shrapnel from airbags deploying with excessive force in Honda vehicles.

Other automakers are affected by the issue, but none as much as Honda.

The Epoch Times

Honda Motor Company will run newspaper and radio ads as well as Facebook posts to get the word out about a potentially lethal defect in millions of its cars.

Since 2008, Honda has recalled 5 million vehicles with airbags manufactured by Japanese supplier Takata.  The airbags can rupture during deployment, sending shrapnel towards the driver and in some cases the front seat passenger.