taxes

Politics & Culture
4:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Stateside for Monday, April 14, 2014

Today, Gov. Rick Snyder rolled out a new statewide recycling plan that aims to increase recycling across the state. Michigan is seventh among the eight Great Lakes states in its recycling performance, and the governor as well as recycling activists agree that we can do a lot better. 

The intersection of college athletics and college academics often causes controversy. To what degree are student athletes allowed to get away with lighter class loads in order for them to play? Paul Barrett of Bloomberg Businessweek joined us to answer that very question.

Tax day is tomorrow and procrastinators out there are scrambling to file. Detroit News Finance Editor Brian O'Connor joined us to explain how we can decrease our chances of being audited. 

On the West Coast during World War II, hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans were put in internment camps. Matt Faulkner, an author and illustrator for kids, tells the story of these internments in his most recent graphic novel, Gaijin. 

Economy
3:46 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

How to decrease your audit odds

It's that time of the year again: tax time is upon us.
Credit levistaxes.com

It's here, or at least it's almost here: Tax day is tomorrow, April 15. 

You procrastinators are likely waiting until the proverbial 11th hour to file. Others may be already opening the envelope with their refund check. 

But lurking in the back of many minds is that nagging question: Will I get audited? 

In actuality, your likelihood of being audited is pretty low, about one in 100, although as your income increases, so do your odds. 

Let's find out how to decrease your chances of being audited, and the dos and don'ts if the IRS decides to take a closer look at your tax return.

Today we're joined by Detroit News Finance Editor Brian O'Connor. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
3:27 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Gov. Snyder signs bills so Michigan cities don't lose revenue

The bipartisan legislation Gov. Rick Snyder signed Friday incorporates a recent deal worked out among his administration, municipalities and business leaders to fully reimburse cities for their lost personal property tax revenue with other state revenue.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has signed legislation designed to ensure local government budgets aren't hurt if manufacturers and small businesses get planned tax cuts.

A phase-out of taxes on industrial machinery starts in 2016 and is underway for small businesses with equipment. The tax cuts will be halted if a statewide vote fails in August.

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Families & Community
1:37 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

State of Opportunity has a new project and needs your tax stories

Credit R. Kurtz / flickr

We're getting ready for a new project here at State of Opportunity, and we're excited about it.

We'll take the experiences of families in towns and cities around the state and turn them into useful news – the kind of news that usually travels between two people when they talk about the way things really work.

Part of what makes this project work are stories and insights from you and the people you know. 

Right now, we're looking for stories about taxes.

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Opinion
10:33 am
Fri February 28, 2014

If Michigan legislators cared, they would end their tax hike on the poor

In an apparent attempt to pander to voters, the Michigan Legislature is rushing to pass an election year income tax cut. This is a little baffling, because the voters don’t want one.

The state has a budget surplus – on paper, anyway – of a little less than a billion dollars. Two weeks ago, an EPIC-MRA poll found only 11% of the voters thought a tax cut was a good idea. The rest were divided about evenly between those who wanted it to go to schools and those who want it to go to our roads.

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Politics & Government
2:43 pm
Sat January 18, 2014

Snyder: Michigan pension tax will stand despite surplus

Gov. Rick Snyder (R-MI) (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - Gov. Rick Snyder says he won't reconsider a controversial tax on income of certain Michigan retirees.

Michigan has a large budget surplus, but Snyder tells The Detroit News that revisiting the 2012 tax is not on his radar. He calls it an issue of fairness, saying pensions shouldn't be treated differently for tax purposes than other retirement income.

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Politics & Government
10:37 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Fees set to increase for Michigan birth, death, marriage records

user The Geary's Flickr

If you need a vital record in Michigan, you'll likely pay more.

MLive's Jonathan Oosting reports a bill recently passed by the state Senate now heads to Gov. Snyder's desk:

Under House Bill 4786, the basic fee for a vital record search will rise from $26 to $34, while an authenticated copy of a birth, death, marriage or divorce record will rise from $29 to $42. Creation of new birth or death certificate will rise from $40 to $50.

Recent budgets for the Department of Community Health have assumed $5.5 million a year in vital records collections, but according to the Senate Fiscal Agency, revenues have come up short in recent years, leaving a $1.5 million structural deficit that the increased fees are designed to remedy.

Politics & Government
3:54 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Fiscal health of local goverments gradually improving, but many still in bad straits

Percentage of jurisdictions overall reporting they are better or less able to meet their fiscal needs in current year compared to previous year, 2009-2013.
Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy UM's Ford School of Public Policy

Michigan's cities, towns, and villages are seeing an overall improvement in their ability to meet their financial needs, but hundreds continue to struggle. That's according to an annual report by the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at the University of Michigan's Ford School of Public Policy.

The report finds that smaller municipalities are having a tougher time than those with populations of more than 30,000. And municipalities in central Michigan and the southern lower Peninsula have been particularly hard hit.

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Politics & Government
4:24 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Weekly Political Roundup: Rough road ahead for transportion funding

Wikimedia Commons

Each week we take a look at Michigan politics with Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, and Susan Demas, columnist for MLIVE.com.

Governor Snyder has been calling for increased funding for Michigan roads to the tune of $1.2 billion a year. This is one of the items he has not gotten a lot of traction on so far from lawmakers on either side of the political aisle.

According to Sikkema, the last time Michigan increased fees and a tax for transportation funding was back in 1997.

"The reason we keep going back to this sales tax issue is because Michigan is relatively unique. It has a sales tax on top of its state and federal gas tax and that sales tax doesn't go to roads it goes to schools and revenue sharing. There are only about three or four states in the country where all the taxes at the pump don't go to roads. Michigan is one of them," he said.

Are better roads, better for business?

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Opinion
8:44 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Medicaid expansion does not equal government expansion

Lessenberry commentary for 8/2/2013

Yesterday I talked about Washington’s offer to expand Medicaid to many Michiganders who currently have no health insurance. The government has offered to make the program available to many poor, but not officially poverty-stricken, Americans.

States who participate will pay only a fraction of the cost. This would immediately provide health care to hundreds of thousands who don’t now have it, and be extremely beneficial to virtually everyone, including employers, who would have a healthier work force.

Though some states sensibly ratified this almost immediately, Michigan has dragged its feet, largely because of bitter ideological opposition to anything that seems to be “government” health care. I said yesterday that this was irrational and was harming our state.

But while I heard from many people who agreed, not everybody did. One woman said I just didn’t understand that this would be terrible because it would be an expansion of government. In fact, the Tea Party has denounced more Medicaid as tyranny.

Well, I think that’s nonsense; I don’t think extending an already existing benefit to more people is expanding government.

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Politics & Government
10:17 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Legislation would allow petition campaigns to cap public employee benefits

Leon Drolet
Wikipedia

There’s legislation pending in Lansing that would allow voters to amend local charters to cap public employee compensation and benefits.

Courts have held that local initiatives don’t trump collective bargaining rights.

Former state Representative Leon Drolet heads the Michigan Taxpayers Alliance. He says the legislation is an effort to get around that, to let voters run ballot drives and amend city charters.

“There would still be a collective bargaining process,” Drolet explained. “They would still set benefit levels, but there would be a cap on what the city could agree to, and what could be part of that negotiating process. Right now, there’s no cap.”

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11:32 am
Tue July 16, 2013

When it comes to the federal pool of money, Michigan is a giver, not a taker

Lead in text: 
Michigan is a net giver when it comes to dollars leaving the state in federal taxes. According to the Economist, from 1990 to 2009, $1.23 trillion went out of the state in federal taxes, while $1.03 trillion in federal spending came into the state during that time frame.
  • Source: Economist
  • | Via: Michael Olson - American Public Media
Where federal taxes are raised and spentSOME American states receive more in federal spending than they pay in federal taxes; others receive less. Over twenty years...
Politics & Government
2:00 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

How a change in immigration laws could give Michigan an economic boost

A protest for immigration reform
user: Boss Tweed Flickr

Michigan could get a boost in new tax revenues if the federal government approves proposed changes to immigration laws.

That’s according to a new report.  

The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy predicts Michigan could gain $35 million dollars a year in new sales, property and income tax revenues, under the immigration changes.

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Business
5:01 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Michigan lawmakers look for ways of closing the online sales tax loophole

psmag.com

Michigan lawmakers are looking at how to get online retailers to collect state sales taxes.

Currently, shoppers are supposed to report any sales taxes they owe on online purchases, and pay them with their income tax.

But most people don’t.

State Representative Eileen Kowall’s bill would put the responsibility on the online retailer.   She’s quick to say this is not a tax increase, just making sure that the taxes that are owed are being paid.

Kowall says the current system puts Michigan’s ‘bricks and mortar’ retailers at an unfair disadvantage.

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Politics & Government
8:26 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Democrats call for repealing some state taxes

House Democratic Leader Tim Greimel
Official portrait

State House Democrats spent “tax day” pushing a plan to repeal several state tax policies.
 

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Business
11:38 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Michigan processes shorter corporate tax returns

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan says the new corporate income tax returns it's processing are much shorter in length than other business tax returns.

The state Department of Treasury says the returns submitted to date average 17 pages. That's 41 fewer pages than the average Michigan Business Tax return.

The Corporate Income Tax approved in 2011 took effect for the 2012 tax year. Some businesses still file an MBT return because they qualify for certain tax credits.

The state says some MBT returns are longer than 1,000 pages.

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Politics & Government
7:37 am
Mon February 25, 2013

In this morning's news: Budget cuts, Detroit bankruptcy, taxes

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Michigan could loose $140 million if federal budget cuts happen Friday

"The White House says Michigan faces about $140 million in losses if an automatic federal budget cut takes effect Friday, and U.S. Sen. Carl Levin says he's hopeful the deadline pressure will prompt Congress to raise money by closing some tax loopholes. The cuts include $67.7 million in gross pay to 10,000 civilian Defense Department employees in Michigan and $42.2 million to K-12 and disability education programs in the state," the Associated Press reports.

Bankruptcy planning for Detroit

"It appears that officials are laying the groundwork for a so-called 'managed bankruptcy' in Detroit—though they hope that won’t actually happen. A process for going through chapter nine municipal bankruptcy is laid out in the state’s new emergency manager law that kicks in next month. Governor Snyder acknowledges that bankruptcy might be the only way to reduce Detroit’s long-term debt—estimated at more than $14 billion," Sarah Cwiek reports.

Taxes impact low and moderate earners this year

"Changes to Michigan's tax structure are hitting low and moderate earners hard this year. Lawmakers approved changes in 20-11 that cut 1-point-6 billion dollars in business taxes, but raised taxes on individuals. Low-income families could be the hardest hit, with the elimination of the child tax deduction, and a reduction in the Earned Income Tax Credit," Vincent Duffy reports.

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Politics & Government
11:11 am
Mon February 18, 2013

Where do Michigan's tax dollars go?

Where do our taxes go?
John-Morgan creative commons

Ever wonder where your Michigan tax dollars go?

MLive’s Jonathan Oosting has an article today that breaks it all out.

He notes that:

Michigan is one of eight states that levies a sales tax on fuel purchases, but it does not devote any of that revenue to road maintenance or repairs.

Read more
Politics & Government
9:56 am
Sat February 16, 2013

Tax increases affecting more Michigan residents

(file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - In the height of tax season, many Michigan residents owe more money to Lansing.

Some major income tax changes approved 21 months ago by Gov. Rick Snyder and lawmakers are just now starting to hit taxpayers filing their state returns.

Homeowners and renters used to qualify for a credit if their household income was no more than around $83,000 a year. Now they don't get it unless their total household resources are $50,000 or less.

A state tax deduction for children is gone. So is a special exemption for seniors.

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Politics & Government
3:05 pm
Fri December 21, 2012

Michigan Gov. Snyder touts major accomplishments in 2012

Michigan Gov. Snyder talks about 2012 accomplishments with reporters today.
Gov. Snyder Twitter

Governor Snyder says despite mounting political tension, his second year in office brought about many major accomplishments.

During a year-end roundtable with the press today, the governor touted a number of policies he says will move the state forward.

They include an agreement to build a new international crossing in Detroit, a phase-out of the state’s tax on industrial equipment, and a regional transit authority for southeast Michigan.

Snyder had to be asked before he made any mention of some of 2012’s controversies, including the new “right-to-work” law, and emergency managers.

He says lawmakers in 2013 should not let those issues get in the way of bipartisanship.

"That’s the start of the process to bring people back together, to say ‘we’re looking beyond just people saying they’re fighting, but we should be looking to service our citizens,’" said Snyder. "Because what really matters is customer service to our citizens, not hard feelings over some other particular issue."

The governor also said the “right-to-work” law is already attracting attention from businesses looking to move to Michigan.

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