teeth

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State officials are looking at a potential new source of data on lead exposure in Flint: baby teeth.

Assessing the effects of Flint’s lead tainted tap water in children is tricky. Blood lead tests only tell part of the story. 

State Health Department director Nick Lyon says studying baby teeth could help.

“The concept would be as children’s teeth fall out there is a potential that you could use information from that going forward as part of a lead registry,” Lyon said.

Lyon says the idea of studying baby teeth is still in its early stages.

Dental bus to provide services to kids in Wayne County

Jun 15, 2015
Pieter Vanhaecke / flickr creative commons

Kids across Wayne County are expected to receive access to dental health services via a new bus.

The Delta Dental Foundation gave the University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry  $584,907 for a bus, and four portable dental chairs.

Faculty and students from the University will travel on the bus and provide a variety of dental services at different schools. The chairs will be used to treat children at the schools.

 Teri Battaglieri is with the Delta Dental Foundation. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report says preventable dental treatment is taking a bite out of Michigan hospital emergency room budgets.

The Anderson Economic Group study says in 2011, about 7,000 people with cavities, abscesses, and other preventable dental problems showed up in Michigan ERs.  About 1,000 needed to be hospitalized.

MARQUETTE, Mich. (AP) - A Michigan inmate who blamed prison officials for his bad teeth has another cavity to fill: a $353 bill for his failed lawsuit.

A judge has ordered Jerry Flanory to pay for transcript costs, copy fees and a nominal $20 for the state's cost of the one-day trial. The money will go to the state of Michigan.

Flanory claimed his teeth and gums suffered because he was cut off from toothpaste at a prison in the Upper Peninsula. The state denied the allegations and said the Flint man had only five teeth when he entered prison.

MARQUETTE, Mich. (AP) - An inmate who blames Michigan prison officials for gum disease is getting his day in court.

Jerry Flanory's lawsuit against three people is going to trial Monday in federal court in Marquette. He claims he lost a tooth in 2006 and suffered gum disease because he was denied toothpaste as a punishment for not attending prison classes.

The state says the doomed tooth was already loose and that Flanory had access to plenty of toothpaste.