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user: shawncampbell / Flickr

Today is Twitter's 8th birthday.

Naturally, everyone is celebrating by participating in self-indulgent retweets of the first thing they ever said.

Here's ours from early 2009.

SpecialKRB / flickr

Think, for just a moment, of the many ways we capture moments of our lives and share them with everyone.

Snap a photo on your smartphone and in seconds, it's up on Twitter or Facebook or Instagram for friends, family and followers to see.

But what is going to happen to those moments and memories someday in the future when Instagram or Tumblr or Facebook or Flickr no longer exist?

These days, we are constantly being told how great the so-called new media are. Thanks to smart phones, the Internet, Twitter, Facebook, and all the rest of it, we can all share everything with everyone in the world at a nanosecond’s notice. That is to say, without thinking about it.

On occasion, this has allowed journalism to break new records getting the story first. But more often, it has allowed us to break new records in getting things wrong, in embarrassing ourselves and doing harm to others.

One horrible example of this happened last weekend. U of M President Mary Sue Coleman addressed the crowd at Michigan Stadium during the halftime game against Nebraska.

Flickr user rutty / Flickr

Ever since the rise of Facebook we’ve heard the warning: be careful about what you put on Facebook, watch what you post online. What if a prospective employer checks out your Facebook page and sees something that tanks you for that new job?

But, in his recent article in Crain’s Detroit Business, writer Chris Gautz tells us it’s the employer who needs to tread lightly and carefully in looking at social media, or the online presence of potential hires, and he warns companies to be careful in taking action against employees for their Facebook or Twitter postings.

Chris Gautz joined us today to tell us more.

Listen to the full interview above.

This is what nearly 6,000 University of Michigan graduates look like (courtesy of commencement speaker Dick Costolo's Twitter):

Costolo made a point to live tweet the photo before he began his address to the class of 2013.

dickcdick costolo Commencement @umich

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) - Twitter chief executive Dick Costolo took a picture of thousands of graduates at the University of Michigan - and then tweeted it, of course.

Costolo joked to the crowd that it "should only take a second." The Michigan alumnus was back on campus Saturday to receive an honorary doctor of laws degree. He told graduates to be bold, figure out what they love to do and "go do that."

user joi / wikipedia

I still get the question from relatives, "what do you use Twitter for?"

Twitter is no Facebook, so the value of a 140 character "tweet" just doesn't appeal to them as much as status updates, "likes," and photo albums from friends and loved ones.

But while not as meteoric as Facebook (more than 1 billion users worldwide), Twitter's base of users continues to grow - there are now more than 500 million Twitter users worldwide.

In its most recent report, the Pew Research Center found that 15 percent of online adults user Twitter:

...the proportion of online adults who use Twitter on a typical day has doubled since May 2011 and has quadrupled since late 2010.

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo (or @dickc) is a University of Michigan graduate (#goblue). He will return to campus this Friday to talk about his business (Nov. 16).

Researchers at Michigan State University are exploring the use of Twitter in the classroom.  

The study suggests Twitter will change the way people communicate in the classroom.

State lawmakers are discussing whether to limit employers' ability to demand passwords to social media sites.

A bill would bar companies from asking employees or job applicants to hand over passwords to their Twitter, Facebook or other accounts.

West McGowan / Flickr

Update 5:30 p.m.

Have you ever heard a radio reporter "Tweet" a story?

Michigan Radio's Jennifer Guerra shows us how:

12:08 p.m.

People are all a-Twitter about the social media company opening an office in downtown Detroit.

The office will be located in the M@dison Building on Broadway Street. The building is owned by Quicken Loans Chairman, Dan Gilbert.

This from a press release from Rock Ventures LLC, another company run by Gilbert:

"Twitter coming downtown is exactly the kind of innovative company Detroit needs to advance our vision of becoming one of the most exciting high-tech and web-centered corridors of growth and activity found anywhere," said Gilbert, Chairman of Rock Ventures and Quicken Loans, and Majority Owner of the NBA's Cleveland Cavaliers.

"Twitter chose Detroit because of the city's growing, young and energetic environment.  This is further proof that the country is starting to wake up and take notice – if you want to create a thriving, growing tech business, downtown Detroit is one of the best places to be," Gilbert added.

Twitter is headquartered in San Francisco.

The Detroit office will help "marketers and advertising agencies in Detroit leverage Twitter's Promoted Products suite of advertising products."

The company expects to hire more employees as it grows.

A fake Twitter account has been made for Michigan Budget Director John Nixon. The FakeJohnNixon account started last week and has already posted almost 150 tweets. The Associated Press reports:

The fake account notes that Nixon is Michigan's highest-paid state employee and is consuming Michigan's economy "one big gargantuan bite at a time." It adds, "Just call me Budget Crunch."

A spokesman for Nixon says the budget director "has a great sense of humor" and realizes the tweets aren't to be taken seriously.

There's also a FakeRickSnyder Twitter account on Gov. Rick Snyder with fewer posts.

Rosh Sillars / Flickr

This morning, Chrysler's twitter feed featured something that grabbed people's attention, and not in a good way.

The tweet featured an expletive. A bad one. From the Detroit Free Press:

"The official Twitter account of Chrysler brand vehicles dropped the F-bomb this morning in an off-color update from an employee at the automaker’s social media agency."

"The post read: 'I find it ironic that Detroit is known as the #motorcity and yet no one here knows how to (expletive) drive.'"

"While the tweet has since been deleted, the original post was retweeted by several people on the popular social network, including Twitter user @tverma29, making it impossible to erase from the Web."

CNET suggested that it might have been Eminem causing the mischief, but it turns out that the offending tweeter worked for Chrysler's social media agency of record. From WXYZ:

"The company says that an investigation determined that an employee of their 'social media agency of record, New Media Strategies' posted the tweet Wednesday morning. That employee, who was not identified, has been terminated.

Which is a shame, because it really seemed like Eminem.

-Brian Short, Michigan Radio News

Is Twitter overated?

Dec 10, 2010
Twitter bird logo icon illustration
Matt Hamm - flickr user

Hash tags, retweets, favs, overheard, nudges... to the uninitiated it's like learning Sanskrit.

To the initiated, it's a modern day language.

But a new study finds that Twitter is not used as often as commonly thought.

The Pew Research Center focused a survey exclusively on Twitter. Previously Pew asked respondents whether they used "the Internet to use Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others?"