tyree guyton

The "Taxi House" in the Heidelberg Project.
Heather Phillips / Flickr

Another fire has been reported at the Heidelberg Project in Detroit.

The "Taxi House" was burned inside and in the rear, according to the Detroit News. The paper reports it's the 12th fire in 18 months at the Heidelberg Project.

Security cameras and security patrols were put in place in the last year after a string of arsons struck the project.

Lauren Abdel-Razzaq of the Detroit News reported that Tyree Guyton, the artist behind the decades-old installation, was sweeping up outside the burned house on Sunday afternoon.

More from the News:

Although the art installation's brainchild wasn't saying much about the fire, he was sending a message by standing out front of the house cleaning up what he could: He's standing strong and not going anywhere.

"Mother Teresa said, 'what you spend years building may be destroyed overnight. Build it anyway,' " Guyton said. "That's all I want to say."

He declined to say whether any suspects have been spotted on the organizations security cameras. 

After the string of arsons, the Cultural Landscape Foundation has listed the Heidelberg Project as "among the most endangered in the United States."

Heidelberg Project

This morning's fire marks the 11th house in the Heidelberg Project to be damaged by suspected arson. The project is an outdoor art installation on Detroit's east side.

The house, called the Birthday Cake House, was a vacant home on Heidelberg Street that Tyree Guyton, Heidelberg's creator, had boarded up and beautified.

Katie Hearn is the marketing and communications director from the Heidelberg Project.

Emily Fox / Michigan Radio

An open air art installation in Detroit has become the subject of a suspected arson rampage.

It's had 6 suspicious fires in 7 months.

The fires have demolished several homes that are key to the art project, but the artist behind the project says he’s energized by the wreckage and is ready to begin another stage of his art project.

The Heidelberg Project is on the east side of Detroit and takes over two city blocks.

The "House of Soul" was destroyed by fire this morning.
Heidelberg Project / Facebook

This Tweet came from The Heidelberg Project this morning:

Richard Faulder / Flickr

Your junk is definitely another man's treasure.

Artist Tyree Guyton wants your old shoes for a new Heidelberg Project installation.

A message was posted on the project's Facebook page:

The word is out! Seeking shoe donations for April's "Street Folk" installation -- more details on the project coming soon.

The Detroit News reports:

Old shoes may be brought to the Heidelberg Project office at 42 Watson in Detroit, MI 48201. The office is open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday to Friday. The shoe collection will continue through mid-to-late March.

The Heidelberg Project is two blocks of art installations along Heidelberg Street on Detroit's east side.

Starting in 1986, artist Tyree Guyton converted abandoned houses along his street into pieces of art by painting them and installing various pieces of junk on the houses and up and down the street.

The Heidelberg Project was first maligned by city officials (the city demolished some of the art in 1991), but is now celebrated.

The Detroit News reports that Tyree Guyton will be "honored with a 25-year retrospective of his work at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. The display opens March 30."

Here's more about the project and Guyton: