University of Michigan

Politics & Culture
5:02 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Stateside for Monday, November 18th, 2013

When we talk about Detroit's bankruptcy filing, the point seems to almost always be made that this is historic. That Detroit is the largest city in U.S. history to seek bankruptcy protection. But, that was almost not the case. In the mid 1970's New York City was on the brink of financial crisis. On today's show: What can Detroit learn from New York's comeback?

And, as of today, the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers will no longer sell sugar-sweetened drinks. It's a not-too-subtle push to get healthy, but is it taking away our choice as a consumer? Is it going too far?

Also, the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame has just announced its latest list of inductees. We took a closer look at one of these influential Michigan women.

First on the show, Republicans in Lansing are split over whether people who bankroll so-called “issue ads” should be allowed to remain anonymous.

Issue ads attack or support politicians or causes without using what are called “magic words" like “vote for” or "oppose." Unlike campaign ads, the money behind issue ads can be anonymous.

But, late last week, Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson proposed new rules that would require disclosure of issue-ad donations.

Johnson said, too often, issue ads are just thinly disguised political ads, and people should know who is paying for them.

But, many Republicans disagree. In fact, within hours of Johnson's proposal, the GOP-led Senate acted quickly to amend a campaign finance bill that would make Johnson's new rules illegal.

Rich Robinson, Executive Director of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network, and Jonathan Oosting, Capitol reporter for MLive.com, joined us today.

Stateside
5:02 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

University of Michigan Health Services to stop selling sugary drinks

Flickr user fimoculous Flickr

If you find yourself craving an icy-cold cola or some ginger ale, maybe a Frappuccino coffee, should you be able to crack open a can or a bottle when you want? Even if you know it’s not good for you?

The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers say maybe not. So, starting today, you will no longer be able to indulge that sweet tooth of yours. They will become one of the first in Michigan to stop selling all sugar-sweetened beverages, with the goal of giving us a not-too-subtle nudge over to healthier drinks.

Theresa Han-Markey has been a registered dietician for over 20 years. She is the Bionutrition Manager at the Michigan Critical Research Unit and she’s the Internship Director for Dietetics at U of M. She joined us today to give us a closer look at this sugar crackdown.

Listen to the full interview above.

Transportation
6:12 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

U-M sets goal of driverless car network by 2021

The University of Michigan has announced a collaboration with government and business to make its hometown of Ann Arbor the first American city with a shared fleet of networked, driverless vehicles by 2021. 

The school says its Mobility Transformation Center is pursuing the goal of having a driverless vehicle system in operation within eight years.

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Education
2:16 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

University of Michigan announces $4 billion fundraising goal

University of Michigan president Mary Sue Coleman announced a $4 billion fundraising goal at a press conference today.
Credit Sarah Kerson / Michigan Radio

That's the largest fundraising goal ever for an American public university, and university officials say $1.7 billion has already been raised during what they call a two-year "silent" phase. Included in that $1.7 billion are several high-profile donations from alumni like Stephen Ross and President Mary Sue Coleman herself.

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Sports
2:22 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Michigan and Michigan State set trend by having neurologists on the sidelines

Can you spot the neurologist on the field?
user CedarBendDrive Flickr

No doubt about it — heads are sure to collide on Saturday’s football game between the University of Michigan and Michigan State University.

But when heads collide on the field at Spartan Stadium, two neurologists will be on the sidelines, making sure no concussed player gets back in the game.

Both Jeff Kutcher, an associate professor of neurology at Michigan’s medical school, and David Kaufman, the chairman of the neurology department at Michigan State, will be working on the field for Saturday’s game.

According to the New York Times, while many Big Ten schools have medical consultants for their athletic teams, only Michigan and Michigan State keep them on the sidelines at all games.

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Economy
4:34 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Government shutdown hurt confidence in economy, study says

Holiday shoppers.
Lizzie Williams Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce

Americans are less optimistic about the economy in the wake of the partial government shutdown earlier this month.

That information is coming from the University of Michigan’s "Index of Consumer Sentiment", which measures how confident consumers are in their economy.

Experts say the latest drop in consumer sentiment may impact the holiday shopping season.

From the Associated Press:

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Offbeat
2:09 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Watch the Ohio State Marching Band bring Michael Jackson to life

MJ taking shape.
Ohio State TV YouTube

Marching bands around the nation, be warned. Ohio State has taken it up a notch.

Scroll to 4:12 to see Michael Jackson take shape, and then... moonwalk!

It shows what you can do with 230+ band members - or "pixels" for those in the stands.

It's cool and all, but Michigan has a jet pack guy!

(H/T HuffPo Detroit)

Stateside
4:02 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

The University of Michigan was selected for the 'Gershwin Initiative'

George Gershwin
Flickr user hto2008 Flickr

That's George Gershwin himself at the piano, playing his 1924 composition "Rhapsody in Blue."

As important as George Gershwin and his brother Ira are to the history of American music, there has never been a definitive edition of their joint body of work.

That is about to change.

The entire music world sat up and took great notice of the announcement that the Gershwin family and the University of Michigan have formed a partnership called "The Gershwin Initiative" that will ultimately bring Gershwin's music to students and audiences around the world.

Mark Clague is Associate Professor of Musicology at the U of M School of Music, Theatre and Dance, and he will be the editor-in-chief of the George and Ira Gershwin Critical Edition. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Education
4:58 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

University of Michigan: Good finances this year, $11.5 billion in holdings

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) - The University of Michigan says its financial position is looking pretty good, with a three-quarter-billion-dollar increase in its net worth in the latest year.

The university's financial report released last week shows that the Ann Arbor school's net holdings stand at $11.5 billion. That's up $730 million from a year earlier.

The report says the school's investments have done well in a decade that includes the nation's worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.

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Sports
8:00 am
Fri October 18, 2013

The Mudbowl takes us back to what football used to be

A picture from the 1946 Mudbowl game. In the center is the "Queen" of the bowl.
user Wystan Flickr

 

Tomorrow morning, one of Michigan’s oldest traditions will be on display. No, not at the Big House, but at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house.

That’s where they’ve played something they call The Mudbowl every year since 1933, the same season Jerry Ford played center for the national champion Wolverines, and Columbia University won the Rose Bowl.

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Politics & Government
9:01 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Supreme Court to hear challenge to Michigan's affirmative action ban today

A rally on the campus of the University of Michigan organized by the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action by Any Means Necessary (BAMN).
U-M

For the second time in a decade, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether Michigan’s university admissions policies are constitutional.

Ten years ago, the challenge was to the University of Michigan’s use of affirmative action to ensure diversity on campus.

Today, civil rights groups will argue against the state’s voter-approved ban on affirmative action.

Jennifer Gratz was here in Washington a decade ago.

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Stateside
4:39 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

How deeply do major university donors influence higher education in America?

Real estate mogul Stephen Ross, left, donated $200 million to the University of Michigan in September.
Teresa Mathew The Michigan Daily

It was a gift — with a capital "G."

Real estate developer and Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross made big headlines last month with an eye-popping $200-million gift to the University of Michigan.

The donation is earmarked for the university's athletic department and the business school that already bears the name of Stephen Ross from an earlier gift of $113 million.

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Energy
9:00 am
Fri September 27, 2013

U of M researchers to study how well materials hold up in nuclear reactors over time

Members of the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory work on various projects in the research group's main facility in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering building on North Campus in Ann Arbor, MI on January 15, 2013.
Joseph Xu Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

Engineering researchers at the University of Michigan are trying to figure out how radiation damages the different materials used to make nuclear power plants.

There are roughly 100  nuclear power plants in the U.S., and most of them are getting old. Researchers want to figure out how long the reactors can hold up in such harsh environments over time.

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Stateside
5:16 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

The St. Louis Symphony Orchestra to perform a piece by University of Michigan music student

Composer Patrick Harlin
Twitter

Imagine for a moment, you’re a student at the University of Michigan. A music student. And you compose a piece and suddenly find a major orchestra decides to perform your work. Kind of a dream come true, huh?

Well, that’s the reality Patrick Harlin is living. He is working on his Doctor of Musical Arts degree at U of M, and his composition “Rapture” will be performed by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra later this month.

Patrick Harlin joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:15 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

University of Michigan professor awarded MacArthur Genius Grant

Professor Susan Murphy
http://dept.stat.lsa.umich.edu/

The MacArthur Foundation has announced its “genius grants.” Twenty-four people who the Foundation want to recognize as exceptionally creative individuals who already have a track record of achievement and the potential for even more significant contributions in the future.

One of those 24 is Susan Murphy, a Professor of Statistics at the University of Michigan.

She joined us today to talk about her work and how she plans on using the money.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:29 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

So, whatever happened to moderates in politics? It seems everyone is an ideologue and "compromise" is a dirty word. On today's show, we talked to a former Republican leader who says the disappearance of the moderate is becoming a real problem in his party.

And, we talked with a "genius."

The MacArther Foundation has announced this year's "genius grants," and one of the 24 who has been recognized as an exceptionally creative individual is from the University of Michigan.

And, the new Common Core Curriculum does not require that kids learn cursive, but is that really what is best?

Also, shoplifting is now a felony in Michigan. What does this mean for consumers and shop owners?

And, a music student at the University of Michigan will have his work performed by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. We talked to him about his piece.

First on the show, the Michigan Legislature is considering bills that would overhaul auto insurance in the state.

There are several aspects to this. Jake Neher with Michigan Public Radio Network joined us today to help us wade through what has been proposed. 

Education
9:07 am
Wed September 25, 2013

Michigan universities are waiting to see how a federal government shutdown may affect them

Students walk to and from class on the East Lansing campus of Michigan State University (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The clock is ticking closer to a federal government shutdown.

Spokespeople for several Michigan universities say they're waiting to see what kind of an effect a federal government shutdown may have on their institutions.

Michigan’s universities and colleges get hundreds of millions of dollars from the federal government every year.

But it’s unclear how much, if any, of that money will actually be held up if the government does shut down.  

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Education
4:20 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

No student on search committee for new U-M president

Mary Sue Coleman is leaving office.

This spring the President of the University of Michigan, Mary Sue Coleman, announced she is leaving that post .

The U of M Board of Regents appointed a Presidential Search Advisory Committee this summer and this time it does not include a student.

Matt Nolan is an attorney and the director of Dow Corning’s Political Action Committee. He is the former Michigan Student Assembly president.  And he sat on the search advisory committee that chose Coleman to be President.

In fact, most searches for president of a major university includes a student representative.

The seven people on the Committee are faculty members, although some of them also hold administrative positions.  What are they going to be missing that a student might notice during a search like this?

Listen to the interview above to hear the answer.

Education
4:08 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

The University of Michigan selling 51 acres of land for $3.5 million

(file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

ANN ARBOR TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) - The University of Michigan has agreed to sell 51 acres of vacant land to NSF International for $3.5 million.

The school's eight-member board of regents unanimously approved the sale during a meeting this past week.

The Ann Arbor News reports officials expect to close the sale by the end of October.

The site is in Washtenaw County's Ann Arbor Township. The university plans to retain mineral rights in the sale and to have first opportunity to buy the property if NSF decides to sell.

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Environment & Science
1:06 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Michigan Stadium is hosting a hackathon this weekend

Participants in last year's hackathon present their invention. Last year's competition was on North Campus. This year, hackers will compete in The Big House.
Credit Michigan Engineering / Flickr

Michigan Stadium will be full of college students this weekend. But these students aren't watching a football game -- they're hackers.

A University of Michigan group called MHacks is sponsoring a 36-hour hackathon. It's a competition that challenges participants to use technology to create inventions that solve modern problems.

Thomas Erdmann is a junior at Michigan and the president of MHacks. He says the word hacking gets a bad rap. Erdmann says the hackathon represents what the word hacking really means to engineers.

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