Upper Peninsula

Former Michigan Congressman Bart Stupak will be heading to Harvard University this spring for a resident fellowship. As the Detroit Free Press reports:

Stupak, a Democrat from Menominee in the Upper Peninsula, retired from office this year at the end of his ninth 2-year term. As a resident fellow this spring, he and the other five people selected will meet with students, participate in activities with the Harvard community and lead weekly study groups on a range of topics.

As Politico notes, Stupak, "didn't much enjoy his intense moment at the center of the health care fight and didn't seek re-election."

Prison bars
Ken Mayer / Flickr

Updated 2:23 p.m.:

Michigan Department of Corrections public information officer John Cordell  reacted to the report by saying, "This is why we do audits. It looks like we came up short. We'll be sure to correct our procedures in the future."

12:11 p.m.:

Auditors say officials at Newberry Correctional Facility in the upper peninsula haven't been listening in enough on their prisoners.

The Associated Press reports:

The prison is supposed to document that it monitors at least 50 phone calls a month by inmates. State auditors say they fell short of that target by half during a three-month period earlier this year.

The auditors said phone monitoring is an important part of keeping prisoners from violating prison policies or state law.

The medium security prison in Newberry can hold 1,072 people.

The Michigan Department of Corrections holds more than 43,960 prisoners in 34 correctional facilities around the state.

Friends of the Porkies

Artists can apply to spend part of their summer in a cabin in the middle of the woods. 

The Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park is accepting applications for its artist-in-residence program. The state park is in the western part of the upper-peninsula and borders Lake Superior. The park has 60,000 acres of varied forest, along with plenty of trails.

Sherrie McCabe directs the artist-in-residence program.  She says the artists get to live in a secluded cabin with no running water or electricity:

It’s far enough away from any roads that you really don’t get the traffic noise.  Sometimes it’s dead silent and at other times it’s so loud it’s practically deafening with the sounds of nature. The wind can howl, the owls are noisy, the birds are noisy, but as far as humans go it’s very, very quiet.

Residencies are open to any kind of artist. Applications are available at The Friends of the Porkies.

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