walking

Drew Philp is walking from Detroit to the RNC in Cleveland, passing fields like this one near Monroe, Mich.
Courtesy of Drew Philp

Cleveland is just days away from hosting this year’s Republican National Convention. Delegates, candidates, and reporters are flying and driving from across the world cover the event.

However, Drew Philp chose to use his own two feet. He’s coming all the way from Detroit and documenting his journey for Belt magazine.

And why did he choose the RNC as his destination?

“It’s closer than Philadelphia,” Philp laughed. “But I’m also curious about Donald Trump.”

mainfr4me / Flickr

How do you guide your city or town into the future, without losing those elements from the past that make it special, livable, with a true sense of place?

That's a challenge many towns in Michigan face. Many small towns have lost their unique look, buried by a profusion of generic shopping strips, lots of gas stations, drug stores and fast food restaurants. And then there are the wide freeways and highways that carve a city up.

The city of Marquette is an example of how a city can redefine itself, yet make itself something special, livable and walkable. And what they're doing in Marquette can be a model for towns and cities all over Michigan. 

We are joined today by Dennis Stachewicz, the director of planning and community development for Marquette. 

Listen to the full interview above.