wantwaz davis

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The clock is ticking for Flint mayoral candidate Eric Mays to find enough validate signatures to guarantee a spot for him on the November ballot.

Flint voters are electing a mayor this fall.     

Councilman Eric Mays fell 48 signatures short of the 900 needed for a spot on the ballot. 

Giggles for Mayor

Flint’s messed-up mayor’s race has taken another bizarre turn.

You don’t normally hear a mayoral candidate threatening to literally eat one of his political rivals on election night. But Flint’s mayor’s race this year is hardly normal.

“I will try to feast on that pig at my victory party. He’ll be invited VIP,” joked city councilman and mayoral candidate Wantwaz Davis. 

Flint attorney Mike Ewing says he decided to launch a write-in campaign to elect “Giggles the Pig” after a screw-up in the Flint city clerk’s office meant all mayoral candidates missed the filing deadline.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint mayor’s race is even murkier today.

It appears the one candidate that did file his petitions before a state deadline may not have enough valid signatures.

Other Flint mayoral candidates missed the filing deadline because the city clerk gave them the wrong date.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A Flint city councilman is standing by his statement that the city’s water situation amounts to a “genocide” by Governor Snyder and Flint’s emergency manager.

Councilman Wantwaz Davis made the original “genocide” charge on his Facebook page last Sunday. 

“Either they are trying to run us out of here, the low/moderate income people,” says Davis, “Or inadvertently or intentionally - I hope that it’s inadvertently - I think that it’s going to create a genocide.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Frustration of about the presence of Michigan State Police troopers patrolling Flint hit the street today.

Flint city councilman Wantwaz Davis organized a rally that brought out more than 100 people to Flint city hall.  Davis says state troopers are driving on city streets “like renegades and cowboys.”

We have a new winner in the contest for journalistic understatement of the century. And that is Marjory Raymer, the editor of the Flint Journal, who last week wrote these immortal words: “We didn’t do good enough.“  

Flint elected a new city council last week. Among the winners were a man who served 19 years in prison for murder, and another convicted of felonious assault. Plus two women who filed for bankruptcy. One said she didn’t pay her bills because she needed to give her mother a nice funeral, and added, “If I had to do it again, I would.”  

Now, before you raise an eyebrow at the voters, consider this: The Flint Journal, which is supposed to be that town’s newspaper of record, never reported any of this before people went to the polls.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The new Flint city council was sworn in to office today, including a new councilman who served time for murder.

Wantwaz Davis served 19 years for murdering the man he claims assaulted his mother.   He was paroled in 2010.

Davis says he embraces the biblical story of Paul, who changed from being a persecutor of Christians to being a Christian leader.   He says it’s a path people in Flint should follow.