Mandy / MorgueFile

The National Weather Service has issued a beach hazards statement through 8 p.m. Monday for the Lake Michigan shoreline in Michigan.

High waves and strong currents, including rip currents, are creating dangerous swimming conditions.

Beaches with particularly dangerous conditions today include:

  • South Beach in South Haven
  • Grand Haven State Park
  • Pere Marquette Park in Muskegon
LadyDragonflyCC - >;< / Creative Commons

People in Northwest Michigan are still cleaning up the damage from severe storms that caused damage at some of the state's most popular tourist spots.

Hail damaged fruit trees. Nearly 100-mile-an-hour winds damaged homes and other buildings. It caused almost $35 million in damage in Grand Traverse and Leelanau Counties, according to early estimates.

Lake Improvement Association / Flickr

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that a 2011 algae bloom shut down Toledo's water system. It also incorrectly attributed to Dr. Sonia Joseph-Joshi a statement that this year's blooms are not expected to affect the system.

A growth of harmful algae on Lake Erie has grown larger than last year's bloom, according to the National and Oceanic Atmospheric Adminstration's Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin. 

Wind, rain make a powerful pair as storms hit Michigan

Aug 2, 2015
The Mackinac Bridge on a warmer day.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

MACKINAW CITY, Mich. (AP) - Storms carrying strong winds and rain have pounced on Michigan, cutting power in some areas, snapping trees and knocking over at least one recreational trailer on the Mackinac Bridge.

The bridge connecting the peninsulas was temporarily closed at one point Sunday as winds hit 65 mph. Power outages were reported in the Traverse City area.

Storms rolled into Michigan's thumb region, and forecasters say southeastern Michigan could be vulnerable to high winds throughout the evening.

GaborfromHungary / MorgueFile

The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory that will be in effect from noon across the region from noon until midnight today. 

High temperatures combined with high humidity will create a heat index of around 100 degrees this afternoon.

West Michigan is also under an air quality alert, which means pollutants are expected to be in the unhealthy range for people with respiratory problems. Weather officials say delaying things like using gas-powered lawn mowers or filling up your car can help lessen pollution.

An update from DTE:  Sunday, June 28, 2015 – 11 a.m. 

DTE continues to make progress in restoring the nearly 150,000 customers who lost electric service Saturday due to sustained, strong winds and heavy rain that knocked down trees and power lines throughout southeast Michigan.

DTE crews have restored service to about 60,000 customers, leaving about 90,000 customers to be restored.

The answer is still forthcoming. So far, the National Weather Service has confirmed one EF-1 tornado that touched down in Portland, Michigan yesterday. More than 50 homes were damaged in Portland and there were no reports of serious injuries.

We're seeing a lot of other reports of damage due to the storms, but determining whether those were caused by a tornado takes some ground truth. 

Hillary Pasternak, student
Paula Friedrich / Michigan Radio

Sirens tore through Michigan Monday night, warning of strong thunderstorms and a few tornadoes. As you woke up, groggy at 1:30 a.m., what did you make sure you had before seeking shelter?

We asked a few people what their top three items to save would be.

UPDATE: The National Weather Service has confirmed the damage caused in Portland was from an EF-1 tornado.


Soggy. Drenched. Waterlogged. That sums up the final weekend of May 2015.

It rained intermittently throughout Michigan Saturday, and sometimes the skies opened and it poured.

Parts of Kalamazoo County saw nearly three inches of rain; an inch or more fell through many other areas of the state.

Wikimedia Commons / Wikimedia Commons

This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most devastating weather events in Michigan history: the Palm Sunday tornado outbreak.

It happened with virtually no warning on April 11, 1965. Killer tornadoes smashed through the Midwest over a 12-hour span, killing 271. Michigan was one of the hardest-hit states with 53 deaths.

Flickr user Mike Gifford / Flickr

One of the realities of spring in Michigan is dicey weather, and May marks the beginning of tornado season in the state. But there's a way for authorities to let us know if severe weather threatens.

It's right there on your smartphone: Wireless Emergency Alerts, or WEA.

This service came about through an agreement between cell phone providers who voluntarily signed up for this service, the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security, and a few other federal agencies.


Consumers Energy says the winter of "Polar Vortex 2" broke some natural gas records. 

The utility broke its 1994 record for most natural gas delivered to homes and businesses in a 24 hour period. 

That was on February 19 and 20, when temperatures dropped to 20 below zero overnight. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Next week’s thaw is not expected to result in flooding in Michigan. 

Forecasters predict temperatures to rise into the 40s next week. 

“With the semi-warm temperatures and the cool nights, it doesn’t look like we’re going to see significant flooding across the state of Michigan,” says Michigan State Police spokesman Ron Leix. “Our flood risk is really low this year.”


Mother Nature, with her cold temperatures, is turning out diamond dust in Northern Michigan.

Justin Arnott, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Gaylord, described diamond dust as “the wintertime version of fog.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

GRAND HAVEN, Mich.  - Another round of winter weather is expected to make travel difficult in parts of Michigan as bitterly cold temperatures moderate somewhat.

Temperatures on Tuesday morning ranged from just above zero to the low 20s. It was 6 in Detroit, 7 in Grand Rapids and 17 in Traverse City.


TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) - For the second consecutive winter, bitter weather threatens to turn the surface of the Great Lakes into a vast frozen plain.

The federal Great Lakes research laboratory in Ann Arbor reports Friday that nearly 81 percent of the five lakes' surface area is ice-covered. On Thursday, the ice cover exceeded 85 percent.

  The lab's George Leshkevich says the small drop-off probably happened because winds broke apart some ice, creating open spots.

user RachelEllen / Flickr

DETROIT - Bitterly cold weather is expected to persist across Michigan into the weekend.

Temperatures moderated from Sunday and Monday's deep freeze, with readings Tuesday morning ranging from 8 below zero in Monroe to 18 above in Ludington. Highs were expected in the low 20s.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

NEWBERRY, Mich. (AP) - An Arctic cold front has settled over Michigan, sending temperatures plunging to minus 27 in the Upper Peninsula and minus 22 in the northern Lower Peninsula.

The deep freeze Sunday came with an easing of the blowing snow that forced a number of Upper Peninsula roads to close Saturday.


Metro Detroit is digging out from under the third biggest snowstorm in recorded history. Officially, 16.7 inches of snow have fallen.

Dr. Jeff Masters of Weather Underground joined us today. He said 1974 marked the last single-day snowfall of this magnitude.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - A winter storm has unloaded up to a foot of snow as it passed across Michigan's Lower Peninsula, snarling traffic, stranding thousands of air travelers and extending the weekend for hundreds of schools.

The storm has made driving slow and dangerous throughout the region.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

WHITE LAKE TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) - This winter has yet to wallop the Detroit area, but that could change as what may be the first major snowstorm of the season heads toward southern Michigan.

  The National Weather Service in White Lake Township says snow is expected to start falling around midnight Sunday and continue for about 24 hours.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - Michigan utilities are bracing for extremely strong winds, a year after a storm put thousands of people in the dark at Christmas.

  DTE Energy spokeswoman Randi Berris says crews are on standby Wednesday in case weather forecasters are right in predicting gusts of 45 mph or higher in southeastern Michigan. Consumers Energy says it also will be ready.

Michigan State Police

Big, often destructive storms are becoming much more frequent in Michigan.

Over the last 50 years, we've seen an 89% increase in storms that dump two or more inches of precipitation in a single day.

Sami / Flickr

Those of us who lived through last winter are now familiar with the term "polar vortex." But are we using that phrase correctly? Sara Schultz is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in White Lake. Exactly what IS the polar vortex? And what is it not?

Listen to Sara Schultz above

Christoper Sessums / Flickr

Almost 30,000 Michiganders still don't have power after yesterday's wind storms. The dark spots are concentrated in Wayne County, according to DTE.

Of their 180,000 customers who lost power yesterday, all but 22,000 have had it restored.

Meanwhile Consumers Energy says about 6,100 of its customers still don’t have power.

The Mackinac Bridge on a warmer day.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Strong winds are sweeping across the state today leading the Mackinac Bridge Authority to take some precautions. Workers will escort some larger vehicles across the bridge. 

From MDOT:

Currently we are experiencing winds of sufficient force in the Straits area to require an escort of certain "high profile" vehicles across the Mackinac Bridge.

Examples of high profile vehicles include pickup trucks with campers; cars with small boats, bicycles or luggage attached to the roof; Ryder or U-Haul trucks; any vehicle pulling a boat; semi-tractors with enclosed trailers and all trailers with side walls over two feet in height. High profile vehicles must be escorted.

Motorists are asked to reduce their speed to 20 miles per hour as they approach the bridge and be prepared to stop. Bridge personnel are stationed at both ends of the structure to provide instructions regarding how and when to proceed across the bridge.

Since the bridge first opened, only two vehicles have gone over the edge, according to the Associated Press and MLive's Fritz Klug. The strong winds can lead to accidents on the bridge. 

Check out the wind map for a visual on how the winds are blowing today.

The snowstorm hitting the UP on radar.

Winter is upon us and we barely had time to dig our mittens out of that box in the basement.

Our compatriots in the Northwoods are being hammered by an early snowstorm.

Officials from the National Weather Service say at least a foot of snow has fallen on parts of the Upper Peninsula and another foot or two could accumulate in some areas before the front passes through the region tomorrow.

Northern Michigan University in Marquette has closed.

More from the Associated Press:

Michigan State Police

DETROIT (AP) - A newspaper says nearly 10 billion gallons of sewer overflows were released into rivers and lakes in southeastern Michigan after a tremendous August storm.

  The Detroit Free Press says the number comes from reports to state regulators. The waste came from sanitary sewers that couldn't handle the rain and systems that combine stormwater and sewage.

  Untreated waste carries contaminants that can spoil Lake St. Clair beaches in Macomb County and put drinking water at risk. The Free Press says 10 billion gallons would equal about 20 million 50-gallon baths.

Salt trucks
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Advance word from forecasters: This winter could be a replay of the not-to-be-forgotten winter of 2013-2014.

That is not good news for counties still reeling from the costs of clearing record amounts of snow from the roads.

Roy Townsend, Managing Director of the Washtenaw County Road Commission, says the brutal winter last year cost the county nearly $1 million more than what a typical winter would cost. That's between the increased salt price, overtime pay for staff, and extra wear and tear on the equipment.