A street pole in the middle of flood water
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Lansing is one of several cities throughout the state dealing with flooding.

Mayor Andy Schor declared a state of emergency Wednesday. Several streets are still blocked off, making it tougher to navigate sections of the city.

John Estill lives right along the Grand River. Flood water covers his entire backyard and has made its way to his basement.

“We’ve got sandbags around the outside of the house, but it’s still seeping in, and we’re trying to keep ahead of it with pumps,” Estill said.

Estill says the drywall in his basement took the most damage.

A park sign in water
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Several cities in West Michigan are experiencing flooding after heavy rainfall and warm temperatures swept across the state this week.

Newaygo is one such city. Some residents were evacuated from their homes nearly 40 miles north of Grand Rapids.

Riverfront Park in Newaygo has water from the Muskegon River covering park benches and picnic tables.

Georgia Andres is the Chief of Police in Newaygo. She says the city is at "level C" flooding, which means that homes and businesses in the low lying areas have been evacuated.

Lansing City Hall building
Michigan State Historic Preservation Office / Flickr

Lansing officials are urging residents of several neighborhoods to evacuate due to possible flooding.

Mayor Andy Schor declared a state of emergency tonight.

Officials said residents should leave their homes by noon Thursday and stay away until the water recedes. They said rivers will keep rising until Friday.

Whitney Spotts lives near the river in the downtown Cherry Hill neighborhood and has experienced flooding there before. 

She said she and her husband are both musicians, and they are packing up this time.

Snowshoeing in northern Michigan
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

In case you hadn't noticed, it is very, very cold outside. In fact, the past two weeks in Michigan have seen temperatures lower than in Iceland, most of Alaska, and even some parts of Antarctica.

Cold weather isn’t exactly unusual in Michigan, but with low temperatures once again hitting the single (and negative) digits, I wanted to know: are these frigid winters the new normal?

Water faucet
user william_warby / Flickr

Some West Michigan residents are being advised to keep their water running this winter.

Kalamazoo and Muskegon Heights issued frozen water advisories this week.

Marquette Police Department

The "gales of November" came early to the Upper Peninsula and Lake Superior. To make things extra interesting, snow hit the ground today too, and more is on the way.

On Tuesday, this stormy weather produced a 28.8-foot wave at the Granite Island buoy located north of Marquette, says MLive chief meteorologist Mark Torregrossa.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

A new study says Michigan's transportation system is better prepared for climate change than many other Midwest states.

But it's still not enough, according to the Midwest Economic Policy Institute.

Study author Mary Craighead says Michigan will see higher temperatures, heavier rains, increased erosion, and more frequent freeze-thaw cycles.  That will damage bridges, roads and other infrastructure.

Craighead says it's an economic issue for the whole country, not just Michigan.

flooded fields
Michigan Agribusiness Association

Farmers and ranchers in 14 Michigan counties are eligible for emergency loans due to widespread damage amid severe storms and flash flooding in June.

The update from the U.S. Department of Agriculture comes after President Donald Trump last week made a disaster declaration for four Michigan counties.

A tree blown out of the ground, next to a camper.
Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

The storm rolled across Lake Michigan in the dead of night.

Tanner Smith watched the clouds flash far out on the water before he went to bed.  

“It was just terrifying,” Smith says. “It was so quick, it was rapid.”

Smith was camping with his family at Grand Haven State Park along the beach. He thought the storm might miss them.   

“I was like, I hope that doesn’t hit us.”

Michigan Agri-Business Association

Michigan agri-business leaders say recent floods have devastated farm fields and heavily damaged rural infrastructure in several mid-Michigan counties.

More than seven inches of rain fell on parts of mid-Michigan last Thursday. Water inundated farmers’ fields. Dry beans appear to be the hardest hit crop, with about 10% of the crop lost, according to state agriculture industry officials.

Jim Byrum is the president of the Michigan Agri-Business Association.  

Gov. Rick Snyder exits a Michigan State Police helicopter after a tour of flooded parts of Isabella and Midland counties.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Snyder says it’s important for Michiganders to “rally together” in the wake of flooding in Isabella and Midland counties.

More than seven inches of rain Thursday caused rivers to burst from their banks, inundate neighborhoods and wash out roads.

This morning, the governor spent time inspecting the flood damage on the ground and from the air. Snyder saw many parts of the region are still underwater.

A car sits in the flooded parking lot of Midland's downtown farmers' market.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

As floodwaters begin to recede, government officials are assessing the damage in Midland and Isabella counties. 

Storms dumped more than seven inches of rain on parts of mid-Michigan last week, flooding homes and washing out roads.

“In Midland County alone, there’s been 116 roads affected,” says Mark Bone, president of the Midland County Board of Commissioners. “There’s a lot of roads out there we’re still gathering the information, but there’s a lot of damage.”

Getting to work or school is going to be a problem in the areas affected by the flooding.

A storm

Flooding in southwestern Michigan has closed several roadways and swamped the home of the Kalamazoo Growlers baseball team ,while severe thunderstorms caused damage in the Upper Peninsula.

The Kalamazoo River is one of several across Michigan's Lower Peninsula where flood warnings or advisories are in effect.

Flickr user chiotsrun / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's sugaring season in Michigan. Did a mild winter and recent burst of warm weather give maple syrup producers anything to worry about?

Andy Thomas

A storm that hammered the entire state with hurricane-force winds has left behind an unprecedented number of downed poles and power lines. And that poses a new danger for people still without power with the onset of freezing temperatures.

LadyDragonFlyCC / Flickr Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Michigan's wind-generated power woes are not over yet. 

Major energy providers Consumer's Energy and DTE Energy announced Thursday that more than 800,000 homes and businesses were still without electricity, and many in the dark about when they can expect to get their power back. 

Consumer's Energy spokesperson Terry DeDoes says crews have been working tirelessly throughout the week to restore power to the over 320,000 customers facing interruptions, routinely logging 16 hour days. He says while there has been progress, full power is still a few days away.

High winds pushed a large pine tree over onto a house in Ann Arbor.
Andy Thomas

High winds have been punching Michigan squarely in the nose today.

“I was seeing the strongest winds I’ve ever seen in my 35 years as a meteorologist in Michigan today,” said Jeff Masters, a meteorologist with Weather Underground.

Gusts are knocking down power lines and trees across the state. Over 350,000 customers are without power.

A vintage snowmobile exhibit is on display on Saturday, Feb. 18 at Snowfest in Cedarville, Mich. in the Upper Peninsula. As you can see, the snow was already starting to melt.
Josh Hakala / Michigan Radio

Some folks in Michigan were walking around outside with t-shirts this past weekend, and just in case you haven't checked the calendar, it's February! It's just the latest chapter in the often unpredictable and strange weather here in the Great Lakes State.

Fishing on Lake Michigan.
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It’s supposed to be warm throughout the state of Michigan this weekend. Really warm: highs may breach 60 in the southeast corner of the state, while up in the U.P. temperatures could be in the low 50s.

If you’re looking for a good way to get outdoors and take advantage of our temporarily tropical climate, the state’s Department of Natural Resources has an idea for you:

The summer blast happens to coincide with the state’s winter free fishing weekend, during which angling on Michigan’s lakes, rivers and streams requires no fishing license.

Detroit keeps flooding. What's being done about it?

Sep 29, 2016
Detroit residential street flooding.
Ahmad Hicks

Detroit is once again dealing with flash floods after an intense rainfall Thursday.

Infrastructure issues are a big part of why the area has experienced serious flooding multiple times in the past two years, most notably after a 2014 flood that caused damage across the metro Detroit area. 

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Severe weather is slamming parts of western Michigan as storms move east across the state.

National Weather Service meteorologist T.J. Turnage says Saturday that officials have seen "indications of tornados on radar, and very good indications they have occurred and debris lifted up with them."

Turnage says parts of Allegan and Kent counties, and the outskirts of Grand Rapids are seeing some of the worst weather.

2016 continues its record-setting heat streak this week

Jul 20, 2016
Michigan sunrise
FLICKER USER JULIE FALK https://flic.kr/p/bsL795

If you like it hot, you're in luck.

If you can't stand to sweat, it might be time to crank up the air conditioning or head to the nice cool basement.

Michigan's going to be so hot over the next few days, it's being called the "Ring of Fire."

An unusually dry, hot June is hurting crops across the Midwest, including Michigan.

Everything from beans to sugar beets to wheat is suffering, says Kate Krepps of the Michigan Farm Bureau.

"It's been a strange year," says Krepps.  "We had such a wet beginning, so it was really challenging for folks to get crops in the field in a lot of different areas, particularly in southern Michigan.  And then they got them in the field, and we haven't had much rain since then."

The situation could reduce yields and profits for the roughly 75,000 people who farm in the state.

Flickr user pcurtner/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

For most of Michigan, this has been one of the driest starts to summer we’ve seen in a long time.

With Fourth of July coming up, there are concerns about fires in these dry conditions.

For this reason, Julie Secontine, the State Fire Marshal, has been considering banning fireworks this Fourth of July.

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Across Michigan, sirens will wail this afternoon

This is Severe Weather Awareness Week in Michigan.

This afternoon at 1:30, there will be a voluntary statewide tornado drill.

“Tornadoes can develop rapidly, with little or no warning,” says Capt. Chris Kelenske of the Michigan State Police, who is the deputy state director of emergency management and Homeland Security. 


The Ann Arbor city council has asked its Environmental Commission to review whether it should ask the U.S. EPA to order a Superfund cleanup of groundwater contamination.

A plume of groundwater contaminated with 1,4 dioxane from the city's now-closed Pall Gelman plant is spreading from the city limits towards Ann Arbor Township, Scio Township, as well as towards the Huron River.  

cohdra / morgueFile

More than a hundred thousand people are still without electricity, after high winds yesterday downed power lines across the state.

And some of them may remain in the dark for a few days.

Altogether more than 140,000 customers lost power.

Consumers Energy customers got hit hardest. More than 120,000 of them lost power. Outages were concentrated in the Grand Rapids and Cadillac areas. As of 4:45 p.m. Thursday, there were 99,409 customers till without electricity.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) - Authorities have responded to numerous crashes during snow squalls across Michigan, including a pileup involving several dozen cars.

  The Grand Rapids Press reports white-out conditions Friday afternoon on U.S. 31 north of Grand Rapids led to a chain-reaction crash of roughly 50 vehicles. A stretch of the freeway was closed.

Your photos of this weekend's record breaking snowfall

Nov 23, 2015
Our staff shared some snow photos too, including this beautiful shot of sunrise and snow.
Michigan Radio

Saturday's snowstorm broke records across Michigan.

Howell got the most snow with 16.8 inches, but most of us woke up to a snowy blanket. Chilly, yes, but drifting flakes on Saturday and a sunny Sunday made for a beautiful first snowfall. 

Here's what you shared with us on Instagram and Twitter