world trade center

The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in 2000.
Joshua Schwimmer / Flickr

The state of Michigan owns public parks, roads, buildings, and even some historic artifacts. Among those artifacts are the original architectural drawings of the World Trade Center.

This is a story of how the state of Michigan – its taxpayers – came to own the works.

Thousands of people visit the 9-11 Memorial in New York every day.

Children play by the fountain that surrounds the footprint of what once were the world’s tallest buildings. Some people take the time to read at least some of the names of the people who died here on 9-11.

A piece of aluminum cladding from the World Trade Center is going on display at Castle Museum in Saginaw.
Jeff Schrier / Saginaw News

A permanent exhibit commemorating the events of September 11, 2001 opens today at the Castle Museum of Saginaw County History, reports Emily Pfund at Mlive.com.

A piece of aluminum cladding about 5 feet long and 4 feet wide is the latest addition to the lobby of the museum, 700 Federal in downtown Saginaw.

 Many Michiganders have paused to remember 9/11 at numerous events today.  There are a few more commemorations planned for this evening.    

Governor Rick Snyder is scheduled to take part in special ceremonies on the front lawn of the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn.   The candlelight vigil is being sponsored in part by the Dearborn Area Ministerial Association.   Organizers say the point of the event is to promote the sense of unity that many Americans felt immediately after the attacks. 

 An East Lansing based group is remembering those September 11th victims with ties to Michigan.   The Michigan Remembers 9/11 Fund is collecting memories about those who died in the attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon or in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.  

Susan Moriarty is with the Fund.   She says it’s important to remember that the attacks struck close to home, not just far away.  

(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

A group of Detroit area imams say they are glad U.S. Navy Seals killed Osama bin Laden over the weekend. The imams representing different groups within southeast Michigan’s Muslim community say Osama bin Laden’s death was justified.       

Dawud Walid is with the Council on American Islamic Relations. He says bin Laden was a criminal for his acts of terrorism. Some have  questioned whether bin Laden's burial at sea may have disrespected Islamic tradition. Dawud Walid disagrees.

“Osama bin Laden did the ultimate disrespect  when he attacked churches and mosques…and when he killed thousands of Americans at the  World Trade Center.  That’s the ultimate disrespect.  Not whether he was buried on  the water or under the earth.”

The imams agree that the U.S. government should release as much information as possible about the hunt and death of Osama bin Laden. Not toconvince them. But to keep Osama bin Laden's followers from refusing to believe he’s dead.

They are concerned that Osama bin Laden could otherwise become something of an "Elvis Presley"-like figure among his followers.

White House

Late last night, President Obama announced to the nation that Osama bin Laden had been killed by a small team of American forces at a mansion in Pakistan.

Obama called Bin Laden "a terrorist who was responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children."

Update 7:14 a.m.

The Detroit Free Press reports on the celebrations from the Muslim and Arab-American community in metro Detroit upon hearing the news of Osama bin Laden's death:

"The world is definitely a better place without the patron of all terrorists," said Imam Hassan Al-Qazwini, head of the Islamic Center of America in Dearborn, the largest mosque in a city that has the highest concentration of Arab-Americans in the U.S. Qazwini called bin Laden "the world's most infamous thug."

"It is so comforting to see justice being served while the families of the thousands of his victims rejoice," he said.

Ibrahim Aljahim, 29, of Detroit, said of bin Laden: "He never represented Muslims or anyone else."

..."As gratifying as it is to see this, we should continue to be on alert," said Imad Hamad, regional director of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee. "Executing the symbol of bin Laden does not execute the ideology (of extremism). It's a vital mistake to focus on the person and ignore the ideology."

12:09 am

NPR reports:

Osama bin Laden, who created the al-Qaida terrorist network that killed 3,000 people in the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, is dead.

He was killed, President Obama announced to the nation late Sunday night, in Pakistan by U.S. forces. During a firefight with bin Laden's guards, which the president said happened earlier in the day, no American personnel were injured.