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Families & Community

Paula Reeves
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Last week, a 17-year old student opened fire at Santa Fe High School. He left 10 dead and 10 more injured.

With every mass shooting in the United States comes a cry to address the issue of mental health. Lawmakers say we need to identify these troubled kids — and get them mental health resources before something terrible happens.

The Spoke Folks, a Grand Rapids non-profit, wants to put "More Butts On Bikes" and help people maintain them.
user kconnors / morgueFile

Nearly 500 Detroit second-grade students have received new bikes, helmets, locks and bells after completing a bicycle safety program.

The bikes and other items were given Tuesday to the students by the Detroit Red Wings, Chevrolet and the Detroit Public Schools Foundation during a special assembly at Little Caesars Arena.

The students attend 10 schools in the Detroit Public Schools Community District. They have been practicing riding and learning road safety since April in their physical education classes as part of the Road & Bicycle Program.

Flickr User Thetoad / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Long-debated legislation in response to the Larry Nassar sexual assault scandal could move out of House committee. Nassar is the former Michigan State University sports doctor who will likely spend the rest of his life in prison for sexually assaulting his patients.

There are more than 30 bills in the committee in response to Nassar. The committee has made amendments to some of them – but others might not get a vote at all. Bills getting changes include those passed earlier this year by the Senate.

Group of five people in graduation cap and gown
User Kyle James / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Foster care advocates gathered in Lansing Tuesday to celebrate the tenth anniversary of Fostering Success Michigan.

The statewide initiative's mission is to help teens and young adults who've been in foster care graduate from college and build successful careers. 

Getting a college acceptance letter is exciting for most students, but especially for those who've spent time in the foster care system. That's because only 20 percent of graduating teens who've been in foster care make it to college. 

pixabay

A question to boost Michigan’s minimum wage to $12 an hour could be headed to the November ballot. A petition drive says it’s gathered enough signatures to force the Legislature to adopt the initiative, or it goes to voters.

Michigan’s minimum wage rose to $9.25 an hour in January.

Campaign chair Alicia Farris says the initiative will not only increase the minimum wage again, it will also end the lower minimum wage for workers who earn tips.

Lily Holshoe in her Mermaid Nadie costume touching a fish
Courtesy of Lily Holshoe

 

If South Haven figures in your Memorial Day plans, get ready: You're going to see mermaids, mermen, and even merkids. 

It's the first-ever Mermaid MegaFest – four days of celebrating merfolk while focusing on preserving our natural freshwater resources. 

Michigan State University
John M. Quick / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Lawmakers in Lansing say a settlement between Michigan State University and survivors of Larry Nassar doesn’t mean their quest for justice is over.

Nassar is the former university sports doctor who sexually assaulted his patients under the guise of treatment. More than 300 survivors are suing the school for not stopping him, and MSU faces a potential $500 million settlement.

In the Legislature, lawmakers have crafted more than 30 bills in response to what Nassar did.

An abandoned and boarded up house in Detroit
University of Michigan School for Environmental and Sustainability / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


 

The first line of Sarah Alvarez's report in Bridge Magazine packs quite a punch: "Antoinette Coleman lost her home for less than the cost of an iPhone."

 

That price tag was just $291 to be exact.

Nicole Beverly
Stateside Staff / Michigan Radio

Lawmakers in Lansing are focused on giving some crime victims more rights and protections.

Governor Rick Snyder will have to decide if convicted criminals should be required to listen to their victims in court. The legislation, on its way to his desk, is in response to a defendant who was convicted of killing a woman – but who left the courtroom during the family’s statements.

“For me, it’s a matter of putting victims first,” said bill sponsor Holly Hughes, R-Montague. “Putting humanity first is the principal of all this and making sure you do the right thing.”

Samar Baydoun Bazzi

The holy month of Ramadan begins this evening. For the next month, Muslims around the world will fast from sunrise to sunset and devote more time to reading the Holy Koran.

Samar Baydoun Bazzi of Dearborn wanted to make the holy month a little festive for her family. After years of seeing Christmas trees and other holiday decorations, she came up with a Ramadan tree. She joined Stateside to talk about how she came up with the idea and its reception by her family and local community.

matthileo / Flickr

Activists from across the state shut down streets in Lansing Monday. The Michigan Poor People’s Campaign launched at the state Capitol.

The campaign wants a massive overhaul of voting rights laws, new programs to get people out of poverty, and measures to boost the economy in favor of working people.

Jerry Goldberg is with a coalition to stop foreclosures, which is part of the campaign. He said all the struggles they’re fighting against – from racism to worker’s rights – are similar.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A controversial company will provide some Flint residents with bottled water for the next several months.

Nestle has been criticized for its deal to pump more water from rural Michigan for its bottled water business.

The company has agreed to distribute thousands of those bottles for free to Flint residents.

Stateside 5.8.2018

May 8, 2018

Today on Stateside, we play a new mixtape from West Michigan featuring The Go Rounds, Lady Ace Boogie, The Founding, and The Hacky Turtles. Also today, we discuss mandatory reporting and whether it hurts survivors of campus sexual assault.

needle
Partha Sahana / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

It began in Switzerland in 1986 as a way to combat overdose deaths and diseases linked to opioid drugs: safe injection sites, also known as supervised injection sites.

It’s a place where users can inject drugs in a clean place, with clean needles, and under medical supervision.

PUBLIC DOMAIN

More children in Michigan are dying because of abuse or neglect compared to a decade ago. Back then, the state settled a federal lawsuit, promising to improve its child welfare system. The state has spent millions of dollars on that effort.

Welcome to MorningSide 48224, a community podcast. We’re loaning out audio equipment so MorningSide residents can record themselves and conduct interviews to tell their own stories through sound.

Listen to the stories below:

Thomas Hawk / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It wasn't all that long ago when proud parents might carry a small photo album they would happily whip out to show photos of their kids.

Today, parents have various options for sharing photos of their kids on social media. But what do kids think about all that sharing?

Michigan leaders want to make crumbling Detroit fort into national park

May 3, 2018
Historic Fort Wayne
Wikimedia Commons

A movement is afoot to make the historically rich but deteriorating Historic Fort Wayne in Southwest Detroit into a national park, Bridge Magazine has learned.

As construction is set to begin this fall on the $4.5 billion Gordie Howe International Bridge linking Detroit and Windsor, Ontario, community and state leaders increasingly are focusing on the future of the fort grounds that lie directly to the east.

Andrew Jameson / Wikimedia Commons

Siwatu-Salama Ra is a young Detroit activist who was sentenced to two years in prison for brandishing a licensed and unloaded firearm in what she claims was an act of self-defense. Her conviction has raised questions about the nature of black gun ownership in the United States.

Stateside 5.1.2018

May 1, 2018

Today on Stateside, University of Michigan graduates discuss why so many of their classmates don't stay in Michigan. And, armed with history, black gun owners weigh in on exercising their Second Amendment rights.

Take a tour of MorningSide 48224 with Detroit Public TV

May 1, 2018
Corner of Mack and Alter
Detroit Public TV

Michigan Radio's Imani Mixon was on Detroit Public TV last weekend to discuss MorningSide 48224, the new podcast project by Michigan Radio and the Detroit Journalism Cooperative.

Watch below to get a tour of the neighborhood, and to learn more about the podcast:

Emma Winowiecki/ Michigan Radio

A woman who says Michigan State University ignored her sexual assault complaints is considering a run for the school’s board of trustees.

Amanda Thomashow says she's strongly considering a run for the position. She’s a survivor of Larry Nassar. He’s the former MSU doctor who sexually assaulted his patients for years. Thomashow reported Nassar to school officials, but her complaint was swept under the rug.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Four years ago this day, the world turned upside down for Flint.

It happened as then-Mayor Dayne Walling and other officials officially switched the city's drinking water over to the Flint River -- and then toasted each other with glasses of that water.

That untreated water caused water pipes to corrode -- leaching lead into the water going into Flint homes and businesses. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high lead levels. And government officials, especially at the state level, dismissed the pleas of people who knew something was wrong with the water.

Stateside 4.23.2018

Apr 23, 2018

Today on Stateside, we talk to Lee Anne Walters, the Flint water activist who just won the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for grassroots environmental activism. And, we learn what microbiomes can tell us about death from an MSU study exploring the life of a corpse.

A picture of Lee Anne Walters with her son Garrett outside of her home in Flint in 2015
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

 


 

The Goldman Environmental Prize is the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for grassroots environmental activism.

Yoga mats set out and ready for the class to begin
Sarah Leeson / Michigan Radio

After what is often years of waiting and paperwork, some refugees from desperate situations around the world are fortunate enough to be accepted into the U.S. But then what? If you’ve been in a war-torn area or are a victim of torture, you’re glad to be safe.

But you’re in a strange country. You might not speak English. You might be confused by government bureaucracy or an unfamiliar medical system. Then there’s a chance you’re suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, or other mental health issues. 

Kids at a public school in Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Fewer children in Michigan lived in poverty in 2016, but the numbers are still grim.

The latest Kids Count Data Book says between 2010 and 2016, the state's child poverty rate dropped from 23 percent to 21 percent. However, that still means nearly half a million children lived below the poverty line in 2016.

Rates also remain particularly high for children of color. The report says in 2016, 42 percent of African American children and 30 percent of Latino children lived in poverty.

Stateside 4.18.2018

Apr 18, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn how a washing machine reduced absenteeism at a Detroit school. And, we discuss a Detroit Free Press report that reveals the first signs of cracks between the MSU Board of Trustees and interim President John Engler.

The city of Kalamazoo
Mxobe

The city of Kalamazoo has made headlines with its unique Kalamazoo Promise: anonymous donors pledging to pay up to 100 percent of college tuition for the kids who graduate from the city's public schools.

Here comes another effort: Shared Prosperity Kalamazoo. The vision? Turn Kalamazoo into a community where no adult or child is left behind because of poverty or inequality of opportunity.

Kevin Rosseel / morguefile

Inmates at a mid-Michigan prison are on lockdown after gang related fighting.

Multiple fights broke out over the course of several days. They started Thursday, and occurred multiple times on Sunday during meals and finally on the prison yard on Monday. The facility has been on lockdown since Monday at lunchtime. Lockdown means inmates don’t have any privileges and are confined to their cells.

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