Stateside
3:30 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

How are teachers and school administrators dealing with the upcoming "new" MEAP?

Lawmakers ordered the Michigan Department of Education to stop preparing for the Smarter Balanced Assessment and return to a revamped MEAP test.

How is this playing out for the teachers and administrators who have to teach and give this overhauled MEAP test?

William Heath is the Superintendent of the Morrice Area Schools and the Principal at Morrice Junior and Senior High School in Shiawassee County.  He said the changes have been very difficult.

“We need some consistency. We need a target to shoot at. We don’t need the target to keep moving around,” he said.

Heath said they are judged by the growth from the previous year and when the assessment changes, they don’t know how they can measure that growth.

“If we are taking different tests, it’s a weird science experiment that there is too many variables in there. It’s going to make it that much harder to realize what exactly our students know and don’t know,” Heath said.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
3:06 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

"Baroque on Beaver" festival starts this weekend

Credit Wikimedia Commons

"Baroque on Beaver" is a classic music festival held on Beaver Island running from July 25 to August 3.

Anne Glendon heads the Beaver Island Cultural Arts Association.

She said there will be about 50 musicians at the festival. Most of them have lived in Michigan or have strong ties to the island.  The concerts are held in different venues on the island. There is a variety of music playing as well, such as chamber music, jazz, and baroque, of course.

“It’s quirky, just like the island and we wouldn’t have it any other way, and also it’s, we think, pretty top rate music,” Glendon said.

Check out the performance list here.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
2:58 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

MSU's Abrams Planetarium's 50th Anniversary

Abrams Planetarium is a planetarium in the center of Michigan State University's campus.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

It's the 50th anniversary of the Abrams Planetarium at Michigan State University.

Those five decades have seen enormous changes in America's space program and in the way we think of space.

Shannon Schmoll, the director of MSU's Abrams Planetarium, said that planetariums have evolved and changed a lot through the last five decades, and a lot of those changes are seen in technology. Schmoll said the ability to use digital projection allows planetariums to show things beyond earth.

“We can fly out to Mars and can actually fly through Valles Marineris, which is a canyon on Mars about the size of the United States,” she said. “So we can actually travel the universe, so to speak, which is very exciting,” she said.

Schmoll said the knowledge that has been acquired over the decades provides planetariums with a lot more excitement.

“We still have people who come in and they have tons of questions about what’s going on in space. They want to know what’s going on with Hubble, what’s going on with the new missions,” she said. “ It’s a sense of wonder that just never goes away with what’s out there."

*Listen to the full story above. 

Stateside
2:53 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Detroit Water suspends shut-offs for 15 days

Credit user rob zand / Flickr

The Detroit Water and Sewage Department is suspending shut-offs for 15 days.

Department Spokesman Bill Johnson said this suspension is a pause, not a moratorium. 

The department has been receiving a lot of criticism worldwide for shutting off water to 17,000 customers since March.

The 15 days will allow people another chance to come forward and prove they cannot pay their bills. The time will also be spent communicating with customers about payment plan options and financial assistance.

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Stateside
1:19 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Michigan grad rates below national average

Credit Wikimedia Commons

More and more students in Michigan are taking five or more years to finish college and get their degrees. Ron French from Bridge Magazine has been researching this for his new article, and he talked about the trend today on Stateside. French said nationally, 31% of students earn a bachelor’s degree in four years. In Michigan, 12 of the 15 public universities are below that average.

Staying in school longer is more expensive, as extra semesters add cost. French said the fifth and sixth years are usually the most expensive, because financial aid dries up after eight semesters.

“Student debt nationally is over $1 trillion now,” said French.

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Stateside
12:41 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

A new book follows one polar bear's recovery after cruel captivity

In early April 2005, Bärle brought her new cub, Talini, outside into the tundra enclosure for the first time. For the next few weeks, Talini stuck by her mother’s side as if she were tethered.
Credit Courtesy of Tom Roy

They've been on the earth for five million years. From their fur to their body fat, they've evolved to thrive in extremely cold temperatures. So the cruelty of removing a polar bear from its Arctic home and forcing it to live in a filthy Caribbean circus, in temperatures that soar over 100 degrees, is indescribable.

Else Poulson is an animal behaviorist, and she's a guest on today's Stateside program. She's also the president and co-founder of The Bear Care Group. Poulson was part of a Detroit Zoo team that helped a polar bear named Barle after she was rescued from a Caribbean circus called the Mexican Suarez Brothers Circus. Poulson wrote a book about the experience called "Barle's Story: One Polar Bear's Amazing Recovery from Life as a Circus Act."

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Politics & Government
12:15 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Forget left and right on water shut-offs. Let's figure out how to fix the non-payment problem

Update: The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department has announced a 15-day suspension of its controversial shutoff campaign.  

​Unless you’ve been completely out of touch, you know that the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department has been shutting off service to thousands of customers who haven’t paid their bills.

This has sparked huge controversy, protests and even condemnation from the United Nations. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes even got involved.

Last week, he told the deputy director of Detroit’s water department that shutting off water to city residents has, quote "caused not only a lot of anger in the city (but) also a lot of hardship."

And the judge added, "it’s caused a lot of bad publicity for the city it doesn’t need right now." That much is not in dispute. But not everyone is in agreement that this is an atrocity.

Kevyn Orr, Detroit’s emergency manager, supports the shutoffs, saying that the rule everywhere is that “if you use water, you have to pay for it.” He notes that there’s an assistance program, and says that if people are in trouble, “all they need to do is call.”

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Law
11:50 am
Mon July 21, 2014

DWSD will temporarily halt controversial water shutoffs

A DWSD spokeswoman insists this is a “pause," not a moratorium, to give people time to pay their overdue water bills.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department will stop shutting off water service to people with unpaid bills.  

Curtrice Garner is a DWSD spokeswoman.  She insists this is a “pause," not a moratorium, to give people time to pay their overdue water bills.

“What we are going to do is temporarily stop the shutoffs or collections efforts,” says Garner, “However, after the 15 day period, we’ll commerce what we were doing which is shutting off those who are in delinquent status.”

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Families & Community
11:47 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Genesee County tries to deal with feral cat population

Credit Gaurav Pandit

Feral cats have become a serious problem in Genesee County.

The cats can be seen all over the county's towns.

Cats can reproduce up to four times a year with an average litter of six. So officials and animal activists have been pushing residents to spay and neuter their cats. 

Jody Maddock is the program director for Adopt-a-Pet in Fenton. She said the problem has really gotten out of hand.

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Law
11:12 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Jury selection begins in Renisha McBride shooting case

Credit Family photo

DETROIT (AP) - Jury selection starts today in Detroit in the trial of a 55-year-old man who shot to death a young woman who had been knocking on his door in the wee hours of the morning in November.

Prosecutors say Theodore Wafer grabbed his shotgun, opened the front door of his Dearborn Heights home and blasted 19-year-old Renisha McBride in the face.
 

McBride was drunk but unarmed when she had gone to get help after crashing her car.

Wafer claims McBride was aggressive and violent and that he acted in self-defense.

Law
6:00 am
Mon July 21, 2014

We should learn whether Detroit retirees approved the "grand bargain" today

We should know how Detroit retirees voted on the proposed “grand bargain” later today.

City pensioners had until July 11th to vote on the city’s bankruptcy restructuring plan, formally known as the “plan of adjustment.”

The grand bargain is just one part of that plan.

It would use more than $800 million in combined state and private foundation dollars to backstop city pension funds, minimizing retiree losses.

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Business
5:21 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Fmr. U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson wants more foreign investment in the Great Lakes region

Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson is seen here at a reception in Beijing co-sponsored by the Paulson Institute at the University of Chicago and the Center in Beijing.
Credit University of Chicago-Paulson Institute

The nation’s former Treasury Secretary has an idea about how to bring more foreign investment to the Great Lakes region. He’s coming to Detroit today to pitch it to the city’s business leaders.

Henry Paulson sees the Great Lakes region as a place presenting a lot of opportunities for emerging markets, like China, to invest.

Paulson was President George W. Bush’s Treasury Secretary during the 2008 financial crisis. He championed the $700 billion bailout of the nation’s banks. Before that, Paulson headed the investment firm of Goldman Sachs.

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Politics & Government
10:57 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Top state House Dem: Road solution not likely before November election

State House Minority Leader Tim Greimel says a vote on road funding likely won't come until the Legislature's lame duck session.
Credit WKAR-TV

The top Democrat in the state House says a road funding solution will probably have to wait until after the November election.

State House Minority Leader Tim Greimel says too many lawmakers are not willing to make the tough vote until they’re past their reelection bids. That’s because boosting infrastructure spending by more than a billion dollars a year would likely mean raising taxes to pay for it.

“I think there’s a very high likelihood that it doesn’t occur until lame duck, unfortunately,” said Greimel, D-Auburn Hills, on an appearance over the weekend on the Michigan Public Television program Off the Record.

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Business
2:50 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Plan to transform downtown Detroit released

An artist's conception of the yet-to-be named downtown hockey arena.
Credit Olympia Entertainment

Downtown Detroit could undergo a major transformation under a development plan unveiled today.

The organization that owns the Detroit Red Wings says it wants to transform the northern part of downtown Detroit into a sports/entertainment/retail and residential destination.

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That's What They Say
8:55 am
Sun July 20, 2014

Different from, or different than?

For some folks, it makes a big difference whether you say X is different from Y or X is different than Y.

This week on That's What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan look at the confusion surrounding the use of "different from" and "different than."

According to Curzan, both forms are correct and it's just a matter of preference.

"Some people think it should be 'different from' because it is a question of exclusion, it's not a question of degree, so if things are different, you're excluding everything else," says Curzan. "Speakers have been using 'different from' and 'different than' since the 17th century. And in British English, speakers have also used 'different to', so we've got 3 different propositions happening there."

Curzan explains that with a noun, many speakers opt to use either one. For example, one might say a psychologist's view will be 'different than' an economist or a psychologist's view will be 'different from' an economist. In these cases the use of either form is correct.

What about the next phrase? Which one is right? 'Someone went missing' or 'someone is missing.'" Curzan says it's another case of British English entering into American English.

Which form do you prefer to use? Different from or different than? Let us know by leaving a comment below!

Omar Saadeh - Michigan Radio Newsroom

Law
5:04 pm
Sat July 19, 2014

Supreme Court orders exam of Michigan judge's mental health

The Michigan Judicial Tenure Commission wants the judge suspended, but the Supreme Court didn't go that far. The court says the judge must be examined for "psychiatric disorders."
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The Michigan Supreme Court has ordered a judge to undergo a mental health exam.

The judge's name was not disclosed in an order released Friday. The judge's attorney, Brian Einhorn, says the judge went on leave earlier this year because of a physical problem and remains off the bench. He declined to elaborate.

The Michigan Judicial Tenure Commission wants the judge suspended, but the Supreme Court didn't go that far. The court says the judge must be examined for "psychiatric disorders."

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Law
3:58 pm
Sat July 19, 2014

Michigan inmate accepts $250 to settle lawsuit

John Jacobson
Credit Michigan Department of Corrections

JACKSON, Mich. (AP) - The state Corrections Department has agreed to pay $250 to settle a lawsuit by an inmate who said his health was harmed by exposure to mold and bleach.

John Jacobson says he was told to remove the mold with undiluted bleach but no mask. He says the mold in his cell gave him allergies, and bleach caused nose bleeds, sinus problems and headaches.

The 44-year-old Jacobson was housed at the Cotton prison in Jackson. He's now at a prison in mid-Michigan with 2 1/2 years left before he's eligible for parole for third-degree criminal sexual conduct.

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Economy
1:52 pm
Sat July 19, 2014

U.S. commerce secretary praises Michigan during forum

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker
Credit U.S. Dept. of Commerce

BENTON HARBOR, Mich. (AP) - U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker says Michigan is "on a roll."

Pritzker spoke Friday in Benton Harbor at the North American headquarters of Whirlpool. The forum attracted executives from Whirlpool, Dow Chemical, Stryker, Steelcase, Gentex and many other Michigan-based companies.

The Herald-Palladium reports that Pritzker said Michigan has great leaders in business, government and higher education.

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Politics & Government
11:41 am
Sat July 19, 2014

Nurses rally against water shutoffs, declare "public health emergency" in Detroit

Actor Mark Ruffalo, center, joined the protest against water shutoffs in downtown Detroit.
Credit Kenny Karpov

Hundreds of protesters gathered near city hall in downtown Detroit Friday, to demand the city stop ongoing water shutoffs.

More than 17,000 Detroit households have had their water shut off for non-payment since March, though many have since had service restored.

City officials say the shutoffs are a necessary measure, because too many people simply don’t pay their bills--starving the water system of up to $100 million in revenues.

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Politics & Government
11:02 am
Sat July 19, 2014

Civil rights groups want to meet with Detroit officials about water crisis

Credit from the Congressman's Facebook page

Civil rights groups are asking to meet with Detroit officials about a controversial water shut-off campaign.

The ACLU and the NAACP want to meet with Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr to find a “fair, humane, and meaningful review process,” which would include adequate notice and a hearing to determine whether individual water customers can’t or won’t pay their bills.

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