Education
2:05 pm
Mon December 6, 2010

MSU receives a spike in illegal file sharing complaints

Students at MSU have received more than 700 complaints of illegal file sharing so far this school year.
User: Extra Ketchup creative commons

Michigan State University students received more than 700 complaints of illegal downloading since September. That’s up from the nearly 200 complaints MSU received this time last year.

Here's how it works:

If a group like the recording industry or a movie studio thinks someone is downloading files illegally, they contact the Internet Service Provider (ISP) and issue what’s called a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) complaint.

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Energy
12:50 pm
Mon December 6, 2010

Testing the offshore winds in Lake Michigan

You have to go into European waters to find offshore wind farms today. The Middelgrunden wind farm near Copenhagen Denmark.
Ilmari Karonen

There are no offshore wind farms in the Great Lakes... yet.

The Muskegon Chronicle reports that "the first floating buoy to test offshore wind energy in Lake Michigan is planned for six miles off the Muskegon shoreline next spring."

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Politics
11:50 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Helen Thomas fires back at Wayne State University

Helen Thomas was a fixture in the front row of the White House press briefing room. Here she waits for a news conference in 2007.
user kellerbn creative commons

Detroit native and a longtime journalist Helen Thomas is outspoken when it comes to defending her controversial comments.

Last week, Thomas defended the comments that got her fired over the summer. In that defense Thomas said that many American institutions are controlled by Zionists.

Here are her comments posted by Politico

"Congress, the White House and Hollywood, Wall Street, are owned by the Zionists. No question in my opinion. They put their money where their mouth is. ... We’re being pushed into a wrong direction in every way."

The Anti-Defamation League said Thomas has "revealed herself as a vulgar anti-Semite."

After her remarks last Thursday, the Detroit Free Press reports that Wayne State University ended the Helen Thomas Spirit of Diversity Award. When the paper called for a comment, Thomas had this to say:

"The leaders of Wayne State University have made a mockery of the First Amendment and disgraced their understanding of its inherent freedom of speech and the press."

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Offbeat
11:32 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Cartoon from The New Yorker hits close to home

A stack of The New Yorker magazines
Tsmall/Flickr

If you're a habitual reader of The New Yorker magazine or you just browse the latest issue's cartoons then you may have noticed a recent cartoon that made you think of home... home that is, if you live in the Ann Arbor or metro-Detroit areas.

As AnnArbor.com puts it:

Without spoiling the joke, we'll just say the cartoon — by Ann Arbor's Dave Coverly — makes reference to shopping malls — and specifically, several we're very familiar with, including Briarwood Mall, Westgate Plaza and Jackson Plaza. Troy's Somerset Mall and Oakland Mall also get a shout-out.

You can see the cartoon at The New Yorker's website.

Improving Michigan
11:14 am
Mon December 6, 2010

3 Things: Martine MacDonald

All this year, Michigan Radio has been asking people from across the state for their 3 ideas for how we can improve things in Michigan. The series is called 3 Things and today, we heard from Martine MacDonald, she's an award-winning artist based in Southeastern Michigan.

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BUSINESS
9:52 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Kellogg CEO steps down

Kellogg's is the worlds leading producer of cereal.
Ben Alman creative commons

I just spoke with a food industry analyst who says Kellogg's next CEO will face challenges right from the start. 


 Erin Swanson is a food industry analyst with Morningstar Financial.  She says the challenge is to speed up development of new Kellogg products.



“Kellogg has been challenged over the past several months, or year by intense competitive pressures.”  


 


 


Battle Creek's big employer is undergoing a big change. David Mackay is stepping down as Kelloggs CEO.

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Opinion
8:59 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Commentary: Buying Congress

 

- By Jack Lessenberry

Tim Walberg, who lost his seat in Congress two years ago, is going back to Washington next month. Once he gets there, he will be paid an annual salary of $174,000 dollars a year.

That sounds pretty good, though it is a little less sweet once you realize that he has to live in two places, including one of the highest-priced real estate markets in the country.

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Governor-elect Snyder
7:26 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Snyder to discuss economic issues at WSU

Governor-elect Rick Snyder
Photo courtesy of www.governorelectricksnyder.com

Governor-elect Rick Snyder will talk about economic issues at Wayne State University later this week, according to The Detroit Free Press.

Snyder will deliver the annual George R. Husband Distinguished Lecture Series keynote address on Thursday from 1-2PM.

The Series' website says the lecture is open to the public but reservations are required.

News roundup
7:13 am
Mon December 6, 2010

In this morning's news...

Autism Debate to Continue in Lansing

It's expected that the debate over whether insurance companies should be required to cover autism treatments for children will continue at the state Capitol next year. Legislation that would have required insurance companies to cover autism treatments stalled in the GOP-led state Senate in the final hours of the 2009-2010 legislative session. Republican Lieutenant Governor-elect Brian Calley has an autistic daughter; he says he hopes legislative leaders in the next session will once again take-up the reforms.

Medical Marijuana Stirs Debate

The city of Wyoming, a Grand Rapids suburb, will consider a ban on the state’s medical marijuana law tonight, Lindsey Smith reports.  The meeting comes just days after the ACLU announced they were taking three Detroit suburbs to court over similar bans.  The Wyoming City Council will consider medical marijuana regulations that are similar to the ones in Livonia, Bloomfield Hills, and Birmingham.

Push for Hunting, Fishing in MI

The incoming state Director of the Department of Natural Resources, Rodney Stokes, told The Detroit News that he wants more people in Michigan to hunt and fish.  Stokes said that he wants to expand the focus of the department's recruitment efforts.  He also said he has no plans to increase license fees.  Revenues from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses were $45.3 million in the most recent budget, that’s down from 2005.

Outdoors
7:04 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Incoming director of the Michigan DNR wants more hunting, fishing

Rodney Stokes, incoming Director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, wants more people in hunt in Michigan
Noel Zia Lee/Flickr

Michigan's soon-to-be Director of the Department of Natural Resources, Rodney Stokes, says he wants more people to hunt and fish in the state.

Stokes was named director of the department by Governor-elect Rick Snyder earlier this month.  Snyder announced he would be dividing the Department of Natural Resources and Environment into two agencies: The Department of Natural Resources and The Department of Environmental Quality.

Stokes told The Detroit News that he wants to expand the focus of the department's recruitment efforts and that he has no plans to increase license fees.

The Associated Press reports:

Revenues from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses were $45.3 million in the most recent budget, said Sharon Schafer, the department's assistant division chief for administration and finance. That's down from 2005 when adjusted for inflation.

State Legislature
6:38 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Autism debate to continue next year

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Terry Johnston/Flickr

It's expected that the debate over whether insurance companies should be required to cover autism treatments for children will continue at the state Capitol next year.

Legislation that would have required insurance companies to cover autism treatments stalled in the GOP-led state Senate in the final hours of the 2009-2010 legislative session.

Republican Lieutenant Governor-elect Brian Calley has an autistic daughter.  He's been one of the most vocal proponents of the reforms.  Calley said:

Eventually the facts will catch up with the decision-makers and this will happen. I plan to advocate for this starting immediately next year and help education the incoming members, the new members, on this issue, and find a solution for the 15,000 families in Michigan that are struggling through this right now.

Calley said he hopes leaders in next year’s Republican-controlled House and Senate will approve the reforms.

Medical marijuana
5:06 pm
Sun December 5, 2010

Wyoming to consider medical marijuana ban Monday

John Ter Beek in his grow room in Wyoming. Ter Beek has been a medical marijuana patient for a year and a half.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

A Grand Rapids suburb will consider a ban on the state’s new medical marijuana law Monday night. Their decision comes days after the ACLU announced they’re taking three Detroit suburbs to court over similar bans.

Wyoming City Council will consider medical marijuana regulations that are similar to rules passed by Livonia, Bloomfield Hills and Birmingham. Those cities are being sued by the ACLU on behalf of a medical marijuana patient with multiple sclerosis.

Attorney and medical marijuana patient John Ter Beek lives in Wyoming. He is also considering legal action if city council adopts the rules. He has been in talks with the ACLU about taking up his case. Officials with the ACLU confirm that but say it’s too soon to say if they will.

Wyoming’s City Council unanimously favored an early version of the ban last month. They have safety concerns when it comes to distributing medical marijuana. Under the new rules, the city would follow federal law over state laws about marijuana. Mayor Jack Poll says he expects final approval despite pending court cases.

Arts
1:39 pm
Sun December 5, 2010

Making art in the woods in the U-P

Friends of the Porkies

Artists can apply to spend part of their summer in a cabin in the middle of the woods. 

The Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park is accepting applications for its artist-in-residence program. The state park is in the western part of the upper-peninsula and borders Lake Superior. The park has 60,000 acres of varied forest, along with plenty of trails.

Sherrie McCabe directs the artist-in-residence program.  She says the artists get to live in a secluded cabin with no running water or electricity:

It’s far enough away from any roads that you really don’t get the traffic noise.  Sometimes it’s dead silent and at other times it’s so loud it’s practically deafening with the sounds of nature. The wind can howl, the owls are noisy, the birds are noisy, but as far as humans go it’s very, very quiet.

Residencies are open to any kind of artist. Applications are available at The Friends of the Porkies.

WINTER
5:39 pm
Fri December 3, 2010

Counties get creative to deal with winter roads

Wayne County has outfitted its trucks to clear more snow faster, and to keep salt on the roads.
Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

Counties all over Michigan are gearing up for another winter plowing season with higher costs and fewer resources.

Wayne County has outfitted about 20 trucks with new side plows that allow crews to make fewer passes to clear snow-covered roads.

Michael Rogers is the Roads Division director for Wayne County. During a demonstration of the equipment, he pointed out an innovation that will save on salt costs. The county has rigged up its trucks to wet the salt as it’s being spread on the roadway.  

You see the salt doesn’t necessarily make it all the way over here, to us. And that’s what you want. You want the salt to get on its intended target, and that’s what it’s doing. Because before the salt would’ve been ten feet back there, and that’s a waste of our resource.

Ten years ago, Wayne County had 726 people working for the Roads Division during the winter months. This year it has a little more than 330.

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Detroit Politics
5:22 pm
Fri December 3, 2010

Mayor, Council to weigh in on new Detroit charter

Detroit Skyline
JSFauxtaugraphy/Flickr

A panel that’s drafting a new governing charter for Detroit will hear recommendations from the city’s mayor and city council this weekend. 

The Charter Revision Commission is looking at everything that has to do with how Detroit operates: How many elected officials the city should have, and how much power they should wield. How to remove elected officials from office. How many departments the city should have, and what services should be mandated.

One issue on which the mayor and city council disagree is how big the city council ought to be. 

There is agreement that the city should move away from its current system of electing members at-large, and have most council members represent districts. But Mayor Dave Bing thinks the council ought to remain at nine members, while the city council is pushing to expand it to 11. 

The Charter Revision Commission is expected to have a draft document finished in March. A citywide vote on the charter is expected next November.

The Commission meets Saturday from 9 am to 5 pm, and Sunday from 1 pm to 4 pm, at Cass Tech High School in Detroit.

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Environment
5:19 pm
Fri December 3, 2010

Congress bans an Asian carp that is already here

They're banned, but they're already here. Current distribution of the Bighead Carp in the U.S.
USGS

Update December 3rd 5:13 pm:

Marc Gaden of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission says "as far as I know, no one thinks there are any Asian Carp in Lake Erie." He says Lake Erie is colored red in the USGS map above because two Bighead carp were found in commercial fishman's nets several years ago. They colored the entire Lake red based on these two incidents.

December 1st 5:27 pm:

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Health Care
4:44 pm
Fri December 3, 2010

Holland to file lawsuit against Blue Cross Blue Shield

Holland is the latest city in Michigan planning to file a lawsuit against Blue Cross Blue Shield over variable fees. The fee is a 13.5% administrative access fee Blue Cross charged the city on any insurance claims filed by employees.  The city claims the insurer didn’t tell them about the fees for 17 years.

Holland Mayor Kurt Dykstra says,

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Politics
3:30 pm
Fri December 3, 2010

Money from special interest groups flooded Michigan congressional campaigns in 2010

A new study finds 3 Michigan congressional campaigns were swamped with outside money during the recent election.  And most of that money paid for negative ads.

National political parties, unions and special interest groups spent $19 million on issue ads leading up to the November election.   The money was focused on the 1st, 7th and 9th congressional districts, where Democrats were trying to fend off strong Republican challenges.

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Education
3:23 pm
Fri December 3, 2010

Legislature clears way for sale of Michigan School for the Deaf

The Michigan School for the Deaf in Flint may soon be sold.

In the wee hours of Friday morning, as the legislature prepared to adjourn its 2010 session, state lawmakers approved the sale of the 153 year old school to a private developer for $1.3 million.

The developer plans to renovate some buildings on the 85 acre site and build a new $15 million complex for the school for the deaf.  The state will pay $2 million a year to lease the site.  

Ridgway White is the developer.  He says the current facility needs to be replaced. 

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Economy
2:46 pm
Fri December 3, 2010

Legislature approves tax credits for Michigan "Aerotropolis"

The runways at Detroit Metro Airport. Willow Run Airport is nearby creating an opportunity for business incubation.
travelpod.com

The current lame-duck Michigan legislature passed a tax incentive package this morning to encourage the development of a Michigan Aerotropolis. 

So what is it? Here's how the Detroit Region Aerotropolis explains the idea:

An Aerotropolis is an emerging type of urban form comprised of aviation-intensive businesses and those businesses that need to be readily connected to their customers. These businesses, and related enterprises, extend outward from a major airport.

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