WUOMFM

Emma Winowiecki

Online News Intern

Emma is currently the online news intern at Michigan Radio. In addition to covering news, she assists with The Environment Report and other programs. Emma is a senior at the University of Michigan majoring in Communication Studies and Screen Arts & Cultures, and plans to pursue radio and digital journalism in the future. When she's not at Michigan Radio, Emma can be found at various coffee shops around Ann Arbor.

speed limit sign
Famartin / Wikimedia Commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The speed limit on rural highways throughout Michigan will be lifted to 75 mph as soon as next week.

The Michigan Department of Transportation announced Wednesday that 600 miles of interstate will increase from 65 to 75 mph limits, and 900 miles of non-interstate highway will increase from 55 to 65 mph. 

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley
Michigan House Republicans

Republican Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley looks to be tossing his hat into the race for governor.

While he hasn't officially announced his candidacy, Calley launched a website early Monday morning with a clock counting down to May 30, when he is expected to formally announce his bid.

The website also features an online ad, in which Calley compares lessons he's learned from parenting his autistic daughter to the way he's learned to govern.

aerial view of Michigan
NASA / Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Earth Day events throughout Michigan this weekend hope to bring people outside to enjoy the fresh air, while also promoting eco-friendly lifestyles and climate education.

A large national March for Science will be held in Washington, D.C. Much like the Women's March in January, partner events are also happening in Michigan.

There are 14 marches planned in cities across the state including Lansing, Ann Arbor, Kalamazoo, and Petoskey.

front of vw car
User Mike Knell / Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A Detroit judge has approved a fine negotiation between the U.S. government and Volkswagen Friday morning.

Federal Judge Sean Cox has ordered the German automaker to pay $2.8 billion in criminal penalties. The company pled guilty to conspiracy and  obstruction of justice six weeks ago.

VW admits that nearly 600,000 diesel cars in the U.S. were programmed to turn on pollution controls during testing and turn them off while on the road.

gavel
Brian Turner / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A new legal challenge is putting a pause on negotiations between the Detroit Public Schools Community District board and Nikolai Vitti, who was chosen as the district's new superintendent this week.

The challenge was filed by Robert Davis, a community activist who threatened the action after the board's decision to hire Vitti was announced. He is seeking a temporary restraining order that would stop the board from negotiating with Vitti.

Wilson Hui / Flickr

Officials have denied a request for a permit to build a new pumping station by a bottled-water company that wants to pump more groundwater in western Michigan.

The Osceola Township Planning Commission on Tuesday night denied granting Nestle Waters North America the permit for the pipeline booster station at Spring Hill Camp. It's part of the company's proposal to withdraw up to 400 gallons per minute from a well in Osceola County.

Out of the 38 under-performing schools that could be closed in Michigan, 25 of them are located in Metro Detroit.
Motown31 / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

After months of interviews and discussions, the Detroit Public Schools Community District school board has chosen Dr. Nikolai Vitti to be its next superintendent.

The vote to enter contract negotiations with Vitti is the first major decision by the board, which was created last year.

Dr. Vitti is currently the superintendent of schools in Duval County, Florida, but he grew up in Dearborn Heights and graduated from Divine Child High School in Dearborn.

The other finalist for the job was River Rouge superintendent Derrick Coleman.

Richard Masoner / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A Lima township man has been sentenced to probation and ordered to pay $3,000 in fines for striking and killing an Ann Arbor triathlete with his car. Terry Lee Lacroix pleaded guilty in March to a misdemeanor charge of a moving violation causing death.

Michigan State Police say the 70-year-old Lacroix was trying to pass another vehicle when he hit Karen McKeachie on Dexter-Chelsea road in Washtenaw County in August. McKeachie was a 17-time national champion in triathlon.

The recalled toys.
Target

Target stores voluntarily recalled several potentially dangerous toys on Thursday, just before the Easter weekend.

The Hatch & Grow Easter Eggs, Easter Grow Toys, and Hatch Your Own Dino toys were included in the nationwide recall. Customers are encouraged to keep those toys away from small children, and can return them to any Target store for a full refund.

Amboo / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The American Civil Liberties Union is objecting to a Michigan school district's restroom policy for transgender students.

The Grand Rapids Press reports that transgender students in the Jenison district must use a gender-neutral restroom, staff restrooms or restrooms that match their gender assigned at birth.

Various social media posts have accused Jenison of banning transgender students from restrooms that match their gender identity.

Kalamazoo Mayor Bobby Hopewell says the opportunity is a "game-changer" when it comes to how the city approaches its future.
Michigan Municipal League / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Kalamazoo will present design concepts and a strategy for the future of its downtown at a community open house tonight. The city is setting aside $10 million to spend on community-building projects over the next ten years.

The plan, called Imagine Kalamazoo 2025, started last year. The Kalamazoo City Council held a planning session Monday night to hear ideas for how to spend the money, which will be funded through a non-profit foundation.

Mackinac Bridge
Julie Falk / Flickr

Falling ice and high winds have shut down the Mackinac Bridge for a second time this week.  

The Mackinac Bridge Authority closed the 5-mile-long bridge Tuesday evening due to high winds. It briefly reopened the bridge for a few hours before again closing it to traffic Wednesday morning.

A person marking a ballot.
Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Detroit unveiled new digital voting machines to volunteers this weekend after years of faulty machines that slowed down the voting process.

The machines are a part of a statewide effort to replace all voting systems by 2018. Voting machines in Michigan have not been replaced in over a decade.

Detroit ordered 700 new machines, which will be installed before the August primaries.

Christoper Sessums / Flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Crews are working to restore power to thousands of customers in Michigan after storms packing high winds, snow and heavy rain hit the state.

Authorities say Thursday's weather was a factor in at least one death. The Kalamazoo County sheriff's department says 57-year-old Kelli Roberts of Gobles died following a two-vehicle crash on snowy roads in southwestern Michigan.

Undersheriff Paul Matyas says she was going too fast for road conditions when she tried to pass a truck.

Lansing City Hall building
Michigan State Historic Preservation Office / Flickr

The Michigan and Lansing Chambers of Commerce are urging city council members to rescind a resolution which declares Lansing a "sanctuary city."

In a letter sent to the Lansing City Council Thursday, business leaders wrote that they want the declaration removed because it sends the wrong message.

Tim Daman, president and CEO of the Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce, and Rich Studley, president and CEO of the Michigan Chamber wrote:

Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

The city of Detroit has approved a new contract with the same company that left 19 demolition sites unfinished for more than 8 months. That work was part of the city's blight removal program, which is currently under federal investigation.

Medical Marijuana
Dank Depot / Creative Commons, http://tinyurl.com/oall5zn

The Monroe City Council approved a decision this week to opt out of authorizing potential medical marijuana facilities. 

The council voted unanimously on the resolution. City Manager Vincent Pastue told The Monroe News that one of the reasons for the action is the lack of regulations related to marijuana facilities.

"It's difficult, if not impossible, for a community to make a land-use decision absent of these regulations."

Brian Turner / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Lawyers for dozens of women who say they were sexually assaulted by a MSU sports doctor are trying to overturn a judge's gag order.

They asked a federal judge to intervene Tuesday and strike an order that bars attorneys and Larry Nassar's alleged victims from talking publicly. Ingham County Judge Rosemarie Aquilina is overseeing a criminal case against Nassar and says his rights could be violated if the public is repeatedly served with negative comments about him.

gavel
Brian Turner / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The city of Hamtramck has settled a whistleblower lawsuit in which the city's former public works director accused officials of firing him for reporting police misconduct and racial discrimination.

Steve Shaya filed the whistleblower lawsuit against Hamtramck in February 2014, saying that he was framed in a hit-and-run in November 2013. Shaya says that he was charged with leaving the scene of the accident, after complaining about a Hamtramck police officer's violation of the city's ethics laws. Those charges were later dismissed.

Jim Brandstatter

Dr. William B. Stegath, Michigan Radio’s longest living alumnus, passed away Wednesday, just two weeks before his 97th birthday.

Bill was best known as the Voice of the Wolverines, and announced Michigan football games on WUOM from 1953 to 1962, a role only held by two other people.

In that time, Bill was the sports director at WUOM, and announced games for Michigan basketball, baseball, and hockey in addition to football games in the fall - quite literally a “U-M Man for All Seasons.”

Lance McCord / Flickr, http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has confirmed the influenza-related deaths of two Michigan children.

Officials did not release any other additional information related to the deaths, other than one was a child in northern Michigan and the other child was in western Michigan.

In a statement, the department reiterated the importance of flu vaccinations for anyone older than six months of age.

test with bubble answers
User Alberto G. / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Michigan House has passed bills that would give high school students more class options to complete graduation requirements.

The legislation eliminates some math, science, health and English courses so students can take classes that would better prepare them for careers of their choosing.

someone getting a shot
Sanofi Pasteur / Flickr, http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is confirming the first case of measles in the state this year.

The department announced Wednesday that a person in southeastern Michigan is being hospitalized after recently traveling internationally and getting sick.

Courtesy Photo / Michigan Supreme Court

Michigan Supreme Court Justice Robert P. Young, Jr. announced today that he will retire by the end of April.

In a statement released by the court, Young says that he is proud of his accomplishments during his time as Chief Justice. 

Mark Goebel / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The longest playoff streak in the NHL officially came to an end last night after the Red Wings lost to the Carolina Hurricanes.

Detroit's playoff streak was the longest run of all four major league sports. In that time, the Wings won four Stanley Cups and six President's Cups.

The last time the Red Wings were not in the playoffs, George H.W. Bush was president, the reunification of Germany was underway, and "The Simpsons" had just aired for the first time.

Charlie Davidson / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A new Michigan law requires doctors or hospitals to report deaths of women during pregnancy or within one year of pregnancy.

The requirement starts April 6. The state has been collecting information on maternal deaths for years, but reporting was voluntary.

The goal is to understand the factors associated with the deaths in an effort to prevent more of them. The state health department says as many as 100 Michigan women a year die during pregnancy or within a year of pregnancy.

Western Michigan University's Main Campus
user TheKuLeR / Wikimedia Commons

A new survey has found that fewer international students are applying to universities in the United States.

The survey by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers says that nearly 40% of schools received fewer admissions from foreign students this year.

And lower international enrollment rates could harm universities in Michigan.

After Wayne County found some 11,000 abandoned rape kits, a statewide survey found another 1800 around the state
http://www.npr.org/2015/02/10/384129985/advocates-join-fight-to-eliminate-detroit-s-rape-kit-backlog

Prosecutors say a second backlog of more than 500 untested Detroit rape kits languished in storage for years after more than 11,000 other unprocessed evidence packages were discovered in 2009.

Jethro Taylor / Flickr, http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

For rural residents worried about visits from black bears this spring and summer, a wildlife expert has some advice: Take down your bird feeders, at least for now.

Katie Keen of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources says bears are particularly attracted to bird seed and suet because they have higher fat content than natural food sources such as roots of early spring plants and insect larvae.

Once a bear finds a bird feeder, it will keep coming back until the seed is gone or the feeder is removed.

User apoxapox / Flickr

Cases of hepatitis A are increasing in Detroit, as well as Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne counties.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced today that there has been a significant uptick in the number of lab-confirmed hepatitis A cases.

In a press release, the department said that 107 cases were confirmed from August 1, 2016 to March 1, 2017. That's eight times higher than the previous year.

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