Lindsey Smith

West Michigan Reporter/Producer

Lindsey Smith is Michigan Radio's West Michigan Reporter. Lindsey has worked as a reporter at radio stations in both West and Southeast Michigan, and her work has been recognized by both the Michigan Association of Broadcasters and Michigan AP. She's a graduate of Eastern Michigan University and Specs Howard School of Media Arts.

Q&A

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter?
Reporting from a hot air balloon was one of the scariest. Trying to bubble-wrap my recording equipment to come with me down a giant waterslide took the most preparation and ingenuity. Mostly I remember people; so many downtrodden, truthful, funny, inspiring, regular-everyday people. Nearly everyone I meet and talk to shapes how I view life in at least the slightest way.

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio?
"Wait Wait, Don't Tell Me." It's hilarious. "On the Media" is a very, very close second.

What do you like best about working in public radio?
Mostly, I'm proud of what we do and the stories we produce.

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The internet! What did anyone do without it! I mean, I remember life without it, but it's amazing how much I rely on it every day.

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
It depends on the season. I love wakeboarding in the summer, hanging out on the beach, going on long walks with my dog Lola, grilling. In the winter I wish I could hibernate. I do enjoy snowboarding and movies and warm drinks indoors then.

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
If I told you, it wouldn't be a surprise!

Pages

Law
7:43 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Judge rules Grand Rapids can put income tax hike extension on May ballot

If the proposal passes, Grand Rapids would use it to pay for street and sidewalk improvements.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

A Kent County judge says Grand Rapids can ask voters in May to approve an income tax extension.

At issue is a temporary income tax hike that's set to expire in July 2015. The city wants to extend the tax an additional 15 years to pay for road improvements.

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The Environment Report
6:36 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Big energy companies face conspiracy, anti-trust violations in Michigan

A natural gas drilling rig in Wyoming. Regulators in Michigan say they're ready to handle more of these drilling rigs.
Bureau of Land Management

The state of Michigan alleges energy giants Encana Oil and Gas USA and Chesapeake Energy worked together to get cheaper prices to lease land to drill for oil and gas.

Michigan’s attorney general filed charges against the companies earlier this month. Today, the companies were arraigned on conspiracy and anti-trust violations.

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Economy
4:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Gov. Snyder: Skills gap most critical issue facing Michigan’s economic future

Snyder says education institutes, state government and the private sector must do more to better prepare students for the middle class jobs of the future.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Closing the skills gap is the most critical issue facing Michigan’s future. That’s according to Gov. Rick Snyder, who made the remarks during his second annual economic summit in Grand Rapids Tuesday.

“We have a lot of wonderful openings but they require more skills than people traditionally thought about,” Snyder said.

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Environment & Science
4:30 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Federal agency wants you to help improve honeybees’ diet

The USDA is trying to improve the honeybees' diets.
cygnus921 Creative Commons

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is trying to give honeybees more and better-quality food in the Midwest.

Dan Zay is a biologist with the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service in Michigan. He says the agency hopes a better variety of high-quality flowering plants will help honeybees rebound from major population losses over the last eight years.

“It’s said that one in three mouthfuls of food and drink that we consume involves the efforts of honeybees,” Zay said.

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Offbeat
11:55 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Veteran treasure hunter solves the last 'Wyoming Riddle'

It took Robert Lyons around a half an hour to dig all the snow away from this utility pole where he thought the medallion was. He ended up finding it about 60 feet down the road.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

I got some bittersweet news this morning.

Bitter because after more than 30 years running, the last “Wyoming Riddler” treasure hunt is over. Sweet because one of the veteran hunters I followed to tell the story last month turned out to be the winner.

I watched Robert Lyons do the heavy lifting one day, shoveling about five feet of snow packed around a utility pole in single-digit temps.

We found nothing.

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Arts & Culture
11:58 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Big changes coming to ArtPrize this year

Families take pictures in front of "Rusty" near the Grand Rapids Public Museum during ArtPrize 2011. Voters picked Rusty as number 5 in the top ten.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

ArtPrize, the annual art competition in Grand Rapids, will still award $560,000 this year, but professional jurors will now have a bigger say in who gets the money.

The people who visit ArtPrize and register to vote have always decided the winner. But this year there will be two top prizes, each worth $200,000. One will go to the top vote-getter. The other winner will be decided by three art jurors.

Dana Friis-Hansen heads the Grand Rapids Arts Museum. He thinks the change will attract more professional artists to ArtPrize.

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Law
5:55 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Anti-nuclear groups oppose bills to define when deadly force could be used to protect nuclear plants

Tall security fences line the perimeter of the Palisades Nuclear Plant. The plant sits between sand dunes near Lake Michigan.
Mark Savage Entergy

Anti-nuclear power groups are fighting a bill that’s working its way through the Michigan House. The bill outlines when security officers at nuclear power plants can use deadly force to stop intruders.

Kevin Kamps is a radioactive waste specialist with the nuclear watchdog group Beyond Nuclear.

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The Environment Report
5:03 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Building owners try their own 'Biggest Loser' competition

Building owners will be competing for bragging rights.
Photo courtesy of Fellowship of the Rich, Flickr

There’s a battle brewing in West Michigan. It’s a competition among building owners who want to cut their carbon emissions.

This battle is not a real knock-down, drag-out blood battle – it's more like a friendly wager for bragging rights. It’s a race to see which building can reduce the most energy use per square foot.

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Politics & Government
2:09 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Frugal Holland takes on biggest one-time debt for natural gas plant

The new natural gas plant will replace Holland's aging coal fired power plant (pictured).
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

The city of Holland will issue $160 million in bonds to build a new power plant. It’s the biggest bond offering the city, the public school district or the city’s publicly owned utility has ever issued.

Holland is home to a huge population of conservatives whose families emigrated from the Netherlands. That's why the city is known for its Tulip Time festival, historic windmill, wooden shoes, and as Holland Mayor Kurt Dykstra puts it, being frugal.

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Education
4:42 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Steelcase plans to donate huge, pyramid-shaped building for new STEM education hub

drtel Creative Commons

Grand Rapids-based furniture maker Steelcase plans to donate its iconic pyramid-shaped building to a nonprofit group.

Steelcase spent more than $100 million to build the more than 600,000 square-foot building in 1989. It’s been for sale for a lot less, around $20 million, for a couple of years. But it hasn't sold.

Steelcase spokeswoman Laura VanSlyke says the company talked to a few potential buyers, but the size and unique shape “does make it difficult for certain companies to take it over.”

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Offbeat
9:46 am
Tue February 25, 2014

The last treasure hunt: ‘Wyoming Riddler’ retires after 34 years of silver bounty

Joe Cramer, aka "The Wyoming Riddler," shows part of the this year's prize. The riddle hadn't been solved as of today.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Every winter, hundreds of people living around Grand Rapids go on a treasure hunt of sorts. They’ve been doing it for decades.

Robert Lyons has been hooked on the treasure hunt for 25 years. Over the years, he’s taken his kids and even his grandkids.

Lyons found the treasure once. He’s still got the newspaper clipping.

“I think it says right on here, I got a 1997 champion cup, which of course is about as proud as you can get of anything,” Lyons said. His treasure also included 34 silver dollars and a complete set of silver tableware.

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Business
2:00 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Hip hops: Growers needed to serve booming craft beer industry

Hops grown on a farm in Leelenau, Michigan.
Andrew McFarlane Creative Commons

A new non-profit association is trying to strengthen the supply chain of Michigan-grown hops.

Hops are one of the main ingredients in beer. The plants grow vertically, up to 25 feet or more, so you don’t need a huge farm to grow one of the main ingredients in beer.

Rick Chapla is vice president of business development at The Right Place, an economic development group based in Grand Rapids. He sees real potential for urban farmers to try growing hops.

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Environment & Science
9:11 am
Thu February 20, 2014

EPA says decision about Kalamazoo’s ‘Mount PCB’ will come this summer

Many residents can see the 80-acre, fenced-off Allied site from their backyards in Kalamazoo.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

The Environmental Protection Agency hopes to select a cleanup plan by this summer for an old landfill site in Kalamazoo that's full of toxic material.

The Allied site served as a dumping ground for the paper mill industry for decades. There are 1.5 million cubic yards of material at the site laced with polychlorinated biphenyl, or PCBs. Some neighbors have dubbed it Mount PCB.

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Environment & Science
8:55 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Now with local approval, Enbridge hopes to finish dredging Kalamazoo River by fall

The Kalamazoo River near Ceresco, Michigan.
Mark Brush Michigan Radio

Enbridge Energy can move forward with plans to dredge thousands of truck loads worth of contaminated sediment from the Kalamazoo River - 135,000 cubic yards to be exact. The cleanup is related to the pipeline company’s 2010 oil spill. 

On Monday night, Comstock Township’s planning commission unanimously approved the company’s plans to dredge. The heavy crude oil has broken down and mixed with the river sediment.

Enbridge was supposed to finish dredging contaminated river sediment a couple of months ago, but it failed to meet the deadline in part because the first set of plans it had in Comstock Township were rejected last summer.

The township said the operation was too close to homes and businesses, among other reasons.

About a dozen residents came to the meeting to raise specific concerns about pollution, smells and noise.

But in the end, the concerns were not enough to prevent the temporary operation in a district zoned for heavy manufacturing.

“I do think that this is the best site of all of the ones that we looked at with a minimum amount of impact,” Township Supervisor Ann Nieuwenhuis said. “And what’s most important is that the river is going to get clean.”

“All of the work will be done under the oversight of the federal and state regulators, and any comments or questions or concerns, we’ll do our best to address those as well," Enbridge spokeswoman Lorraine Little said after the vote.

Getting rid of the oiled sediment is key to meeting standards under the federal Clean Water Act.

Enbridge hopes to start work in a month and wrap it up by fall.

Law
4:00 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

New bills outline when deadly force could be used to protect Michigan nuclear plants

Dry casks behind security fences store spent nuclear fuel at the Palisades Nuclear Plant near South Haven.
Mark Savage Entergy

Federal law regulates nuclear power plants in almost every way. But state law dictates the use of force to keep people off the property.

State Rep. Al Pscholka introduced the bill. He says it was not inspired by any actual security breaches.

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Business
3:43 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Agri-business wants river barges to access Muskegon’s deep water port

Barge and ship traffic transport export cargo on the Mississippi River in the Port of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA on Sept. 9, 2005.
USDA Creative Commons

The Michigan Agri-Business Association wants to open the Port of Muskegon to river barge traffic.

The large, flat-bottomed boats already carry huge shipments from New Orleans up the Mississippi River to ports in Milwaukee and Indiana.

The Michigan Agri-Business Association wants the U.S. Coast Guard to allow the ships to come to Muskegon’s deep water port too.

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Health
5:22 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

More than 300 in Kalamazoo high school to be tested for tuberculosis

TB skin test
CDC wikimedia commons

Health officials in Kalamazoo are trying to ease parents’ concerns over a recent case of tuberculosis. A high school student tested positive for the bacterial infection last week.

“It sounds scary, but it’s not that scary,” said Linda Vail, director of the Kalamazoo County Health Department.

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Politics & Government
1:25 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Another Kent County Commissioner facing felony charge resigns

A Kent County commissioner is resigning. Michael Wawee Jr is facing a felony embezzlement charge for between $1,000 and $20,000, a crime punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

Wawee announced his resignation Thursday. The Republican from the Grand Rapids suburb of Walker was arrested earlier this month.

He's accused of overcharging families for the engraving of grave markers while working as a salesman for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Grand Rapids. Police say the diocese was not aware of the overcharging.

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Environment & Science
10:00 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Enbridge unveils new plans to dredge oily sediment from Kalamazoo River

The pink areas in the Morrow Lake delta are where dredging needs to be completed. The two proposed locations for dredge pads are also highlighted.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Enbridge Energy has new plans to finish dredging oil from the Kalamazoo River spill in 2010. The spill was the biggest inland oil spill in U.S. history. The cleanup has cost the company more than a billion dollars so far.

The roughly 180,000 gallons of crude oil that was left on the river bottom before dredging began isn’t really oil anymore. It's tiny particles of weathered material that’s mixed in with sediment.

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Business
6:45 am
Mon February 10, 2014

Today is the deadline for business owners to apply for a major state tax exemption

A123 Systems Inc.'s battery manufacturing facility in Livonia, Michigan.
A123 Systems Inc. Facebook

Michigan business owners have until the end of the day to file a form that could potentially save them lots of money on their 2014 tax bill.

Michigan’s personal property tax applies to all kinds of things. Carmakers pay the tax on heavy machinery; restaurants pay it on new ovens and dishwashers.

But in order to qualify, business owners have to file a form with their local government.

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