Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside:

A group of unions is launching a petition drive to raise the corporate income tax rate in Michigan, a proposal that flies in the face of Gov. Snyder’s tax overhaul of 2011. The It’s Just Politics team of Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta break the proposal down for us.

It’s happened to the best of us: you said something online that you now regret. Can you take it back, or will your unfortunate emails, tweets and posts somehow live forever? Kimberly Springer sits down with us to talk about what users can do to combat Internet rant remorse.

More options are becoming available to help users clean up their social media image
flickr user Jason Howie / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

It's happened to the best of us: you shot off an email while you were hot under the collar, or you fired off an angry Facebook post or a tweet.

Then, remorse set in.

Is there anything you can do to take it back? Or will your unfortunate emails, tweets and posts somehow live forever?

According to Michigan Radio’s social media producer Kimberly Springer, it's complicated.

Library of Congress / Wikimedia Commons

Ninety two years ago this week, an American president died.

Warren G. Harding became the sixth chief executive to die on office. His death fueled rumors, including the bizarre claim that the First Lady had poisoned the President.

Harding was on 15,000 mile tour of the nation called “The Voyage of Understanding” when he passed.

Harding was in San Francisco and his wife was reading a complimentary newspaper article about him out loud.

Suddenly, “he shuddered and fell on his bed and, as they say, dropped dead,” says Dr. Howard Markel of the University of Michigan Medical School.

Flickr user A.Currell / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

There's no way you can look back at the history of rock and roll, and rock journalism, without looking at CREEM.

The late Barry Kramer started distributing CREEM out of the trunk of his car in 1969. In its heyday, CREEM made its home in Birmingham in Oakland County.

Today on Stateside:

Michigan State University released its State of the State survey results today, and Director Charles Ballard joins us to discuss the results.

Living off the grid can be a lot of work, but one Michigan family has been doing it for years. Joe Trumpey tells us, “It’s really not about the sacrifice. It’s about paying attention.”

flickr user Sara Long / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


Your dollar is worth more.

At least, it is in Canada.

Just four years ago the exchange rate meant it took more than one U.S. dollar to get a Canadian one, but now you can get a Canadian dollar for only 77 cents American.

Mercedes Meija

Living off the grid can be a lot of work, but Joe and Shelly Trumpey and their two daughters have managed it for years. Their home is near Grass Lake in Jackson County. Finished in 2009, the home relies on straw bale insulation, solar power year-round, wood burning in the winter and efficient construction to keep it running.

Flickr user Pictures of Money / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Candidates often publicize the amount of money they have raised by including it in press releases or newsletters. But with campaign financing often criticized for it's ability to sway candidates based on who is funding them, why would candidates willingly draw attention to how much they have received?

Joe DiSano of DiSano Strategies in Lansing says these numbers are targeted at potential donors and their opponents, not ordinary voters.

Sleeping Bear Dunes
flickr user Danielle Lynch / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Last year Sleeping Bear Dunes ranked 13th out of more than 100 national parks, lakeshores, and recreation areas for the number of search and rescue operations conducted there.

International Students’ Committee / Wikimedia Commons

Fiat Chrysler was recently fined a record $105 million dollars for multiple recall violations. This has complicated the goal of the company's CEO Sergio Marchionne to merge with another automaker.

Business columnist Daniel Howes with the Detroit News says Marchionne has "made no secret of the fact that he's most interested in doing a deal with General Motors."

Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon brings us this week's sports roundup:

Tigers approaching the trade deadline

The Tigers came out of this past weekend 11.5 games behind AL Central Division leaders the Kansas City Royals.

After the Red Sox, “beat the crap out of us,” as described by Tigers manager Brad Ausmus, there’s some question as to how things are going to play out approaching Friday’s trade deadline.

This photo gives you a sense for why the pig was called "Giggles."
Giggles the Pig for Flint Mayor / Facebook

Flint's mayoral race has been one to watch this year. An incorrect deadline given by the city clerk led to an almost completely write-in election that brought us the campaign of Giggles the pig.

The legislature eventually stepped in and there are now four candidates on the ballot. Next week Flint voters will finally get to go to the polls for the city's August 4 mayoral primary.

Flickr user Christopher Peplin / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Legislature has been discussing eliminating the prevailing wage law. The law requires contractors hired by government entities to pay workers at union scale wages.

The law has been in Michigan for a few decades and Chris Fisher, president of the Associated Builders and Contractors of Michigan, believes its bad for Michigan.

Today on Stateside:

Flint’s mayoral race has been one to watch this year, and next week voters will finally get to go to the polls for the city’s August 4 mayoral primary. Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody joins us to explain some of the chaos.

Detroit’s auto industry saw over 1.6 million light-vehicle sales in May, the most ever recorded for that month. But Detroit News’ Daniel Howes is worried that, “the wheels are starting to wobble,” for the industry.

Michiganders are feeling better about the economy, but lukewarm on other topics
morguefile user Penywise / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


In Michigan we get a regular glimpse of what people in the state are thinking about the economy, how well they’re doing financially, what they think of the president, the governor, Congress, the state Legislature, and local government.

Michigan State University released its State of the State Survey today. Charles Ballard is the director of the survey.

Today on Stateside:

Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark sit down to talk about Donald Trump’s recent political moves, and the effect he could be having on the Republican presidential field.

Northern Michigan’s tourism industry is huge, but workers are having a hard time finding places to live. Leelanau County Commissioner Ty Wessel joins us to talk about the newly created affordable housing task force and its goals in the area.

Sleeping Bear Dunes, a popular tourist spot in Northern Michigan
flickr user Rodney Campbell / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Northern Michigan’s tourism industry is huge. Likely this summer alone you or someone you know has headed up that way at least once.

At first blush, that sounds as though all that tourism is nothing but great for the economy. It creates a lot of jobs at businesses like restaurants and hotels.

The primary election for Grand Rapids' new mayor will take place next Tuesday
All photos courtesy of candidate Facebook pages

Grand Rapids voters will be electing their first new mayor in more than 10 years, and the primary is a week from tomorrow.

Current Mayor George Heartwell is being term-limited out after serving in office for more than a decade.

Screenshot from Venmo.com

Venmo is a payment application with a social media aspect built-in. Users can easily transfer money to others who use the app, and anyone who is Facebook friends with them can see what the transaction is for.

But the app is attached to users’ bank account, debit card or credit card, and its safety has been continually questioned.

Two of Stateside's interns brought up the application's popularity at the daily production meeting, and host Zoe Clark was taken aback. Why would people want to see what others are doing with their money?

Today on Stateside:

Fiat Chrysler is rushing to assure customers that it does have a software fix to prevent hacking into the Jeep Cherokee and other vehicles, as demonstrated for Wired by two hackers. Paul Eisenstein joins us to talk about this development.

Traverse City Rotary Club / flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


Governor Snyder has made it official: Wayne County is in a state of financial emergency.

County Executive Warren Evans had asked for the declaration.

Wayne County faces a projected budget shortfall of $171 million by 2019.

Lylah's first full test run with the Angel Arms Exoskeleton prototype
screenshot

Sometimes the best way to approach an engineering problem isn’t complicated or costly.  

Two Grand Valley State mechanical engineering students took a step back and simplified a way to help a little girl use her arms.

Casey Maxon

What better way to celebrate the 100th birthday of the Great American road trip than to recreate that very first journey.

Mark Gessler and Casey Maxon of the Historic Vehicle Association are traveling across the country in a restored 1915 Ford Model T touring car, following in the path of 21 year old Edsel Ford, son of Henry Ford.

Historical Association of South Haven

The Titanic and the Lusitania. Those ships are known around the world because of the horrific loss of life when they sank in the Atlantic.

But do we know the name Eastland?

It was 100 years ago this week when the steamer Eastland capsized at its dock in the Chicago River. 844 passengers died in that disaster and the majority of the dead were under the age of 25.

Today on Stateside:

What would things be like if the people of a community got to see and interact with their police officers in relaxed, friendly settings every day, and not just in crisis or crime? Kalamazoo’s Department of Public Safety is rolling out the Community Policing Special Unit to find out

Detroit turns 314 this week! The Detroit Drunken Historical Society is putting on Fête d'Anniversaire, a birthday party celebrating the folklore of Detroit’s French roots.

Minor league baseball is coming to Metro Detroit. Andy Appleby is the founder of the United Shore Professional Baseball League, and he joins us to talk about their plans in Utica.

This year, legendary producer, director and “king of B-movies” Roger Corman will receive the Michigan Filmmaker Award at the Traverse City Film Festival. He sits down with us today to talk about his life and career.

The music industry sure has changed a lot over the last half century, but one venue in downtown Ann Arbor has survived it all. The Ark is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, and Michigan Radio’s Emily Fox brings us the story of how its leadership plans to keep it around for the next 50 years.

Downtown Kalamazoo.
Michigan Municipal League / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


What would it be like if the people of a community saw their police officers not just in crisis or in response to a crime, but in relaxed, friendly settings around town each and every day?

And what if, instead of seeing people at their worst moments, officers got to enjoy pleasant, laid-back interactions with the community?

flickr user Darren Whitley / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Metropolitan Detroit is getting a brand new baseball league.

The United Shore Professional Baseball League is preparing for its inaugural season in the summer of 2016, and a big part of that is a new baseball stadium now under construction in Utica.

Wikimedia Commons

Detroit turns 314 years old this week, and the Detroit Drunken Historical Society is throwing a birthday party to celebrate the folklore of Detroit's French past.

The birthday celebration takes place this Saturday at the Jam Handy Building from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

A scene from Roger Corman's 1961 comedy horror "Creature from the Haunted Sea"
flickr user poppet with a camera / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

This year’s Traverse City Film Festival will include a very special moment.

Legendary producer, director, actor, and screenwriter Roger Corman will receive the Michigan Filmmaker Award.

Today on Stateside:

Since the Great Recession, Michigan has seen unemployment numbers drop to their lowest level in a decade. Auto sales and profits are booming, construction is up, and houses are selling again. But the 2015 Kids Count Data Book out today finds the rising tide of recovery has not lifted all boats, especially here in Michigan.

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