Stateside Staff

Stateside 6.24.2016

Jun 24, 2016

Today, we learn about the power of smells. And, if we know early childhood education is so important,  why don't we pay the teachers more?

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Does an oxford comma clutter up a sentence? The debate rages on.
Rasmus Olsen / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Whether you love it or hate it, the oxford comma evokes some pretty strong feelings – both among people who study language and the rest of us. 

Why?

Flint River and water plant
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Flint water crisis is now an important piece of the city's story and history.

It will affect the city and its residents for decades to come.  

Michigan Radio and countless other local and national news outlets have reported various aspects of the crisis, from how it unfolded to how the crisis will affect the city's children as they grow into adults. And that reporting will continue into the foreseeable future, since Flint water is still not safe to drink, unfiltered.

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

Around 90% of a child's brain is already developed by the time they are five years old.

And that means the learning that takes place before a kid even reaches kindergarten can have a lifelong impact.

Republican presidential candidate at a campaign stop in Warren, Michigan (prior to his stop in Cadillac).
Jake Neher / MPRN

Two of the biggest Michigan political stories this week were the announcement of more lawsuits involving the Flint water crisis, and the "Dump Trump" movement in the presidential race. 

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette announced that his office has filed a civil suit against three companies (Veolia North America and Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam) for their role in the Flint water crisis.

"Their negligence and their failure to act, and their activities contributed to the poisoning of the water," Schuette said.

Elsewhere, there is a movement among the Republican Party to change the rules to stop Donald Trump from securing the presidential nomination. Wendy Day, a Republican delegate from Howell, Mich. recently joined Stateside to talk about the "Dump Trump" movement

Kenn Sikkema and Susan Demas joined us today for our weekly political roundup to give analysis of both stories, and to give their predictions of how each will play out. Listen to the full interview above. 

Michelle Krell Kydd tells us that smells can help us feel a part of a community
flickr user Dennis Wong / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Let's talk about our sense of smell.

Smells can evoke memories, tell us about our surroundings, and influence our mood.

And, according to Michelle Krell Kydd​, smells can help people feel a sense of community. 

The Donaheys with their dog, Buddie, in front of their summer home.
Grand Marais Historical Society

If you're heading to the Upper Peninsula for a vacation this summer, you might choose to stay in a hotel. Maybe you'll camp out in a tent or camper. 

Or maybe, if you're like 20th century cartoonist William Donahey, you'll stay in a pickle barrel.

Screen grab of "Lifestyle Changes & IBD: Dr. Peter Higgins explains his research proposal" / UMHealthSystem

 

When dealing with health issues, it's pretty common for us to turn to the internet. There, we hope to find information and answers.

But Eric Polsinelli didn't feel he could trust the internet to answer questions he had about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Stateside 6.23.2016

Jun 23, 2016

 

Today, we touch base with members of Michigan's congressional delegation to hear their views on the sit-in in the U.S. House over gun control. And, we learn about efforts to bring the arctic grayling, a once-prized fish, back to Michigan waters.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Rep. Dan Kildee / Twitter

Earlier today, House Democrats ended their 25-hour sit-in on the house floor.

Led by U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Georgia, revered for his role in the civil rights movement, Democrats demanded votes on gun control issues such as universal background checks and blocking gun sales to anyone on a no-fly list.

The protest drew a range of reactions from their colleagues and constituents.

Graylings are only found in Alaska, Montana, Russia, and Canada
FLICKR USER PAUL VECSEI / FLICKR / HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/91DHSU

 

Many Michiganders know that a trip up north on I-75 brings you through Grayling. But did you know the city is named for a fish species that hasn't been seen in Michigan waters for nearly a century?

Efforts are underway to bring the arctic grayling back to Michigan waters.

 

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

 

As we hear about the many ways that Dan Gilbert and the Ilitch family are reshaping downtown Detroit. We hear about the new businesses, bistros, bars and restaurants in Corktown, Midtown. The question persists: What about the neighborhoods?

 

All around Detroit, there are homeowners who have made the choice to stay, to roll up their sleeves and do for their neighborhoods what the city has not been able to do.

 

Chuck Brooks is one of those homeowners. He joined us on Stateside.

Stateside 6.22.2016

Jun 22, 2016

Today on Stateside, we hear the first installment of our series Starting over in Michigan. Sharing strong cardamom-scented coffee, Syrian refugees Maan and Bayan tell host Cynthia Canty about their first impressions of Dearborn, their new home.

The film focuses on tribes in the midwest
Screen grab of "Our Fires Still Burn"

Our Fires Still Burn: The Native American Experience is a documentary film that follows the lives of Native Americans who are fighting to keep their culture and traditions alive for us here today and for future generations.

Levi Rickert is one of the film's producers. He joined us to talk about Our Fires Still Burn, the resurgence of Native American culture he's seen in his lifetime, and what he hopes people will take away from the film. 

Michigan AG Bill Schuette announces civil suits against three companies involved in the Flint water crisis.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette announced today he's suing companies that he says allowed the Flint water disaster to, in his words, "occur, continue and worsen."

A refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos
Razi Jafri

More Syrian refugees have come to Michigan seeking a new life than any other state.

The State Department reports that 505 Syrian refugees settled in our state between May 2011 and May 2016. And more are on the way.

The city of Waukesha worked on their proposal for more than five years.
FLICKR USER IMAGE-PRO https://flic.kr/p/91DHsU

 

The governors of the eight states bordering the Great Lakes have said "yes" to Waukesha.

The Wisconsin city will be allowed to draw up to 8.2 million gallons of water from Lake Michigan each day. The city made the request because its groundwater source is contaminated with radium.

This is the first big test of the Great Lakes Compact which was formed by the Great Lakes states eight years ago to keep the lakes' water from being diverted by thirsty cities and states outside of the Great Lakes Basin.

Stateside 6.21.2016

Jun 21, 2016

On our show today, school board veterans reflect on changes to Michigan education. And, we hear how the EA Sports FIFA video game has helped make soccer more popular in the United States.

Fans hold up a flag in support of the U.S. Men's National Team.
Flickr user Dinur/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

Soccer’s popularity in the U.S. has grown remarkably over the last decade. But why has a sport that was once reviled by many Americans grown so fast?

University of Michigan professor Andrei Markovits has one answer: video games.

Enbridge Energy

Increased public and political pressure has led Enbridge to invest $7 million in equipment to protect against a spill from the 63-year-old pipeline under the Straits of Mackinac. The Canadian energy company hopes to bring safety reassurance to Michigan through a series of community open houses near Line 5.

Flickr user Arielle Fragassi/Flickr

Michigan has a rich history of wonderful writers. Among them are more than a few marquee names, but there are so many more whose works have been put on the shelf and are waiting to be rediscovered.

Jack Dempsey and his brother Dave Dempsey are doing their best to call attention to these unheralded Michigan writers with their latest book, Ink Trails II: Michigan's Famous and Forgotten Authors.

The book brings 16 writers' stories to the forefront to help readers rediscover them or discover them for the first time.

Flickr user Paradox 56 / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

There’s a shortage of candidates for school boards across Michigan. About 1,600 hundred seats will be open in 540 districts in the November elections. In the 2014 elections, approximately 70 seats were left open. Why don’t people want to serve on their local school boards?

One Michigan GOP delegate is hoping to prevent a Trump nomination at the Republican convention.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

As the Republican Convention in Cleveland approaches, there’s a sense among some Republicans that the party needs a Presidential candidate who is not Donald Trump.

One MI GOP delegate is fighting to prevent Trump from becoming the Republican nominee. Wendy Day wants to beat Hillary Clinton in November, but she doesn’t want the victor to be Donald Trump.

A pro-marijuana group is going to cA pro-marijuana group is going to court to get a question onto the November ballot.ourt in order to get a petition onto the November ballot.
Flickr user Global Panorama / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

MI Legalize, a group trying to legalize marijuana in the state, is making the court its battleground. The group is hoping to get the question of marijuana legalization on the November ballot.

A state elections board shut down the group's petition, because it failed to get the signatures within the 180-day limit. Now the group is suing to get its question on the ballot.

Jeff Hank, executive director and general counsel of MI Legalize, joined us to discuss his group’s litigation.

GUEST

Make Music Detroit aims to celebrate music and promote music education.
Courtesy of Make Music Detroit

 

Make Music Days have appeared in 700 cities in 120 countries across the world. The events are inspired by France’s Fête de la Musique, a celebration inaugurated in 1982, and they occur on the summer solstice, June 21. Now, it’s coming to Detroit.

Make Music Detroit will feature more than 100 performers, professional and amateur, at 24 venues, and it will run this Tuesday from noon to midnight.

Mike Woo, the event producer for Make Music Detroit, joined us to discuss how Make Music came to Detroit and their goals for the event.

Stateside 6.20.2016

Jun 20, 2016

Today, we hear about a Detroit couple's effort to stop "humpers and dumpers" from using their neighborhood's streets. And, we look at how creativity fuels innovation.

Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

Jonathan Pommerville and Lisa Thompson live in Detroit’s Brightmoor neighborhood. While they view their street as home, others view it as an off-the-radar place to dump trash and drive off. Some also view it as a place to engage the services of prostitutes.

In response to the actions of these “humpers and dumpers,” Pommerville and Thompson pull out their video camera.

Courtesy of violashipman.com

Now that we've gotten ourselves past Memorial Day, nice lazy weeks of summer reading beckon. Packing supplies for a day at the beach has to include a book. Here's a great suggestion for a beach read: The Charm Bracelet by Viola Shipman. It's perfect because it is set in the fictional Michigan beach town of Scoops. 

Stateside 6.17.2016

Jun 17, 2016

Today, a former University of Michigan football player explains how a plant-based diet radically improved his health. And we hear about racial and economic disparity in Detroit from the author of Arc of Justice.

There's a new book out about gerrymandering, but it's so much more than that. 

And it's getting a lot of attention.

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