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Stateside Staff

Stateside 2.16.2018

20 hours ago

Today on Stateside, a reporter explains how race is still a factor in whether you're approved or denied a conventional mortgage. And, we learn how to judge whether or not a business benefits the community.

Michelle Ress / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

For many companies, their sole goal is to increase profits and improve the bottom line. However, there are a growing number of companies that approach things differently.

Some are focusing on a triple bottom line with an eye towards improving the social and environmental good. The company is not just a moneymaker but also a benefit to the community.

But how do you judge whether the company is actually a benefit to the community, and who judges that?

Mapping Inequality: Redlining in New Deal America / Creative Commons

Fifty years ago, the practice of barring people from buying houses in certain neighborhoods or declining home loans because of race or ethnicity became unlawful.

But a new investigation finds it’s still happening.

Sheila Y / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Tonight, silent French films from the early 20th century will play at the Max M. Fisher Music Center in Detroit as part of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s French Festival. But there’s a twist: the films won’t actually be silent. They will be accompanied by the live performance of original scores by the Andrew Alden Ensemble

Mr Niceguy / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

It’s been a busy week in Lansing, between Governor Rick Snyder calling for a variety of policies in the Detroit Free Press, and Democrats and Republicans working together on a controversial tax bill.

Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and former Republican Majority Leader in the Michigan Senate, and Vikki Barnett, former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator, joined Stateside to discuss the week’s political news.

Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Today, the long anticipated movie “Black Panther” is being released. It’s a Marvel Comics movie and the central character is black. A recent article in the New York Times Magazine argued this movie is a “defining moment for black America.”

In a sign of the film's anticipated cultural importance, an organization called Hero Nation along with Ypsilanti High School are taking more than 100 students to a private screening of “Black Panther." 

Stateside 2.15.2018

Feb 15, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn why so many international Olympic figure skaters train in Michigan. And, Jeff DeGraff with The Next Idea says Michigan has the parts to build a powerful economic engine, but they need to be connected.

The old library entry at Marygrove College in Detroit.
Marygrove College Library / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

The wolf was at the door for Marygrove College.  

After nearly a century, the small liberal arts college in Northwest Detroit was drowning in debt and enrollment was shrinking

Courtesy of Maya Stovall

An exhibition currently at the Cranbrook Art Museum challenges our idea of what a theater is. Rather than an ornate performance space like, say, the Detroit Opera House or Orchestra Hall, this exhibition shows that a not-so-typical space can be a theater: a liquor store. The exhibition is titled Maya Stovall: Liquor Store Theatre Performance Films. Maya Stovall is a Detroit artist and who has her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology and Performance Studies from Wayne State University.

Sir Francis Galton in 1893
WikiCommons

This week marks the 196th birthday of someone who occupies a place of dishonor in the annals of science. Sir Francis Galton was born this week in 1822. He was interested in a wide range of fields: meteorology, psychology, and biometrics, but it was his social theory on eugenics that left an unsavory and unhappy mark on the world.

SCREEN GRAB / YOUTUBE

Two Japanese figure skaters who train in Metro Detroit have had their Olympic moment.

Japan's Miu Suzaki and Ryuichi Kihara finished 21st in the pair skating short program – unfortunately not good enough for them to make the finals. They also competed in the team event, where Japan finished fifth overall.

Stateside 2.14.2018

Feb 15, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear why your special someone might be waiting for you at a Traverse City bookstore. And, we discuss why there aren't any medical marijuana facilities in Grand Rapids.

Michigan State University sign
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

The Board of Trustees at Michigan State University knows exactly where they stand with the Faculty Senate.

By a vote of 61-4 yesterday, the Faculty Senate approved a vote of no-confidence in the Board.

Courtesy of Amy Reynolds and Victor Herman

 

If we can't talk about love stories on Valentine's Day, when can we?  

Which is why today seemed appropriate to talk to Horizon Books, right there on Front Street in downtown Traverse City, which has a long history of romantic encounters. 

marijuana plants
Rusty Blazenhoff / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

In 2012, Grand Rapids residents voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana.

And in 2016, Michigan lawmakers passed the Medical Marijuana Facilities Licensing Act, which set up the licensing and regulatory framework for the medical marijuana industry.

But as a story in MiBiz points out, despite all that, Grand Rapids has not moved towards allowing medical marijuana facilities.

Flatiron Books, 2017

Librarian Annie Spence knows what it’s like to love a book so much she has to write it a love letter. She also knows what it’s like for a break-up letter to be in order.

Her letters to books fill the pages of her own new book Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks.

Stateside 2.13.2018

Feb 13, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear how uncertainty over their status is taking a toll for Michigan "DREAMers." And, Michigan hospitals push back against bills to set nurse-to-patient ratio and mandatory overtime.

Drew McLellan / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Music bio shows take center stage this month on Theater Talk.

Today, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brought Stateside the current offerings from professional theater companies around the state. Two shows feature the lives of musicians – Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the “godmother of rock and roll,” and torch singer Peggy Lee.

MEDDYGARNET / FLICKR - HTTP://BIT.LY/1XMSZCG

There is a continuing debate in Michigan, and nationally, about nursing staffing levels in hospitals and whether there's a shortage of nurses.

Here in Michigan, nurse advocates and some lawmakers are pushing for the Safe Patient Care Act.

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

What do we do about the "DREAMers," the hundreds of thousands of people who were brought to this country illegally as children by their guardians or parents?

The answer to this question still eludes Congress, despite two brief government shutdowns that happened in large part over legislators' inability to agree on a solution.

Daniel / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today, the State House Judiciary Committee continues its review of legislation that would change Michigan's civil asset forfeiture laws.

Current law allows police officers to take and keep property from people even when they have not been charged or convicted of a crime.

Among other things, the legislation would require a criminal conviction before police can seize property under the civil asset forfeiture process. Supporters of this reform, like the Mackinac Center for Public Policy and the ACLU of Michigan, say it protects people's property rights and civil liberties.

Stateside 2.12.2018

Feb 12, 2018

Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer? That answer comes today on Stateside. We also discuss why lawmakers are exploring the option to eliminate no-fault auto insurance.

House Buy Fast / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The Next Idea

If you’re arrested and charged with a crime, you’ll likely be asked to “post bail.” Bail is the money that a defendant hands over to the court in order to be released from custody until their trial.

So, if you don’t have a huge bank account, where are you supposed to find, say, $50,000? Traditionally, you go to a bail bondsman.

Judd Grutman has a different idea in mind.

EMMA WINOWIECKI / Michigan Radio

A skillful mining of data can give you a pretty good snapshot of how groups of people are faring -- for better or for worse.

Sarah Szurpicki wanted to find out how Michigan women are faring in education, health, and the economy.

ROBBIE HOWELL / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Michigan's no-fault auto insurance law is seen as the "gold standard" in this country in terms of medical care for drivers badly hurt in a car accident.

Michigan also has the highest insurance costs in the nation, and although various fixes have been floated through the years, nothing gets traction in the state legislature.

TONY BROWN / MICHIGAN RADIO

Between a wild weekend with the Red Wings and coaching change-ups at the Lions, there’s a lot going on in the world of Michigan sports.

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio’s sports commentator, joined Stateside to talk about the week’s news.

Courtesy of the University of Michigan Library

As part of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial Celebration, the University of Michigan Library brought StoryCorps to campus last fall to capture personal stories of those who make up the university’s rich history.

One of the conversations featured Karen Downing, a University of Michigan librarian. She sat down with her father, Harold Johnson, to talk about what it was like for him to make history as the first black dean at the University of Michigan.

fungi growing on cheerio
Courtesy of Robert Cichewicz

Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer?

The final answer is still far in the distance, but a team of scientists believes there is promise in newly discovered Great Lakes fungi.

Stateside 2.9.2018

Feb 9, 2018

Today on Stateside, a longtime Republican joins the board of Voters Not Politicians despite opposition from his Republican friends. Then, in the state of Maine, a Nestle Waters manager is appointed to a board that rewrites environmental rules. Could we see that in Michigan? And, we've got a new Artisan of Michigan: a sign painter.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

bottle of water
Wilson Hui / Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan Legislature is considering three bills that would change how the state determines environmental rules. One of the bills would create an environmental rules committee that could reject or change any rule the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality issues.

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