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Stateside Staff

What do you picture when someone says "traditional college student?" Today we learn why the image in your head might be the wrong one. And, we hear of efforts by the state and hunters to control Michigan's "resilient" coyote population.

Stateside 2.23.2017

16 hours ago

What do you picture when someone says "typical college student?" Today we learn why the image in your head might be the wrong one. And, we hear of efforts by the state and hunters to control Michigan's "resilient" coyote population.

What do you picture when someone says "traditional college student?"
Bradley Gordon / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

What do you picture when someone says "typical college student?"

Maybe you pictured a teenage student who recently graduated from high school. He's off to attend college, which is likely paid for by his parents.

That image is mistaken.

One business in Mid-Michigan has turned coyote control into a contest in order to help limit the population.
mrpolyonymous / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's been nearly a year since the state of Michigan approved year-round and nighttime hunting for coyotes. But how effective has that change in hunting policy been, and how has it impacted the state's coyote population?

miss vichan / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

When classic English poet John Keats coughed up blood in 1821, he knew it wasn’t a good sign. According to medical historian Dr. Howard Markel, Keats was able to diagnose the disease that would end his life: consumption.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

There’s disarray among House Republicans in Lansing today.

The bill to cut Michigan’s personal income tax was defeated very early this morning.

Wayne State University Press, 2017

The story of the Great Lakes is one of remarkable beauty and extraordinary violence.

According to the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum, the Lakes have collectively claimed some 6,000 ships and 30,000 lives. As long as ships have been on the Lakes, ferocious storms have been swallowing those ships—and their crews—whole.

It’s that grim yet compelling history that Cindy Hunter Morgan explores in her new collection of poems, Harborless. The collection is Morgan’s telling of 40 different Great Lakes shipping disasters, stretching across two centuries.  

Stateside 2.22.2017

Feb 22, 2017

Today we learn why Trump's immigration policies could compound restaurants' struggle to attract workers. And, we speak with (and hear tunes from) the oldest pipe band in the state of Michigan. It brought new immigrants together over 100 years ago.

Courtesy of the Flint Scottish

For over a hundred years, the Flint Scottish Pipe Band has celebrated the Scottish highlands in mid-Michigan. It is the oldest pipe band in the state of Michigan, and the eleventh oldest in the nation. 

Last month, the state School Reform Office (SRO) announced that 38 schools could be closed at the end of this school year.
Kevin Wong / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Some parents may have to drive their children ten, 20, even 30 miles to school next year. But those parents still aren't sure if that's the case yet, or if any of their options will be much better than their current schools.

All the confusion is because last month, the state School Reform Office (SRO) announced that 38 schools could be closed at the end of this school year.

STEVE CARMODY / Michigan Radio

Within days of being sworn into office, President Trump signed executive orders calling for tougher enforcement of immigration laws and increased border security.

This week Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly signed off on new rules that show us how the government will be implementing this immigration crackdown.

A recent survey by the National Restaurant Association shows that 27% of restaurant owners say recruiting and retaining employees is their No. 1 problem.
Strangely-Brown / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Restaurants depend on immigrants. Nationally, nearly one in five restaurant employees are foreign born. So what could President Trump's new immigration policies mean for the workers, and ultimately for the food service industry?

Stateside 2.21.2017

Feb 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, progressive constituents explain why they think Republican Congressmen Dave Trott (R-Birmingham), Mike Bishop (R-Rochester) and Tim Walberg (R-Tipton) are avoiding them. Also today, a recent report found that Michigan is the only state where students have not improved on a national reading and math test. We hear from the author of that report as well.

Constituents of Rep. Dave Trott protest at his office in Troy, demanding that the Congressman hold in-person town hall meetings.
Sarah Scwiek / Michigan Radio

Across the country, members of Congress have been holding town halls and some have gotten a little heated.

Here in Michigan, constituents of Republican Congressmen Dave Trott (R-Birmingham), Mike Bishop (R-Rochester) and Tim Walberg (R-Tipton) are calling on their representatives to hold in-person town halls.

Three constituents of those elected officials joined Stateside to discuss the challenges they've faced while seeking audiences with their respective congressmen.

A sign is posted outside of Rep. Dave Trott's office in Troy
Sarah Scwiek / Michigan Radio

Progressive constituents say Republican Congressmen Dave Trott (R-11), Mike Bishop (R-8) and Tim Walberg (R-7) are avoiding them. Stateside spoke with three such constituents today. 

Below are responses from the offices of the three named Congressmen:

Empty classroom.
Motown31 / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Are Michigan’s schools improving? According to a new analysis of national testing data, the answer is a clear “no.”

The report, authored by University of Michigan professor Brian A. Jacob, looked at the scores of 4th- and 8th-grade students on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. The nationally administered test measures for proficiency in reading and math.

In 2010, oil spilled into a creek near the Kalamazoo River from Enbridge Line 6b
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio


It was April of 2010 when Enbridge Line 6b ruptured, spilling more than a million gallons of Canadian heavy crude oil into a creek near Kalamazoo.

It was the largest inland spill in United States history.

That spill gave Michiganders a very good reason to sit up and pay closer attention to the nearly 3,300 miles of hazardous liquid pipelines that weave through our state, particularly Enbridge Line 5, which runs in the Straits of Mackinac.

Davies said the characters in his book all "struggle with the burden of representation. How do these individual Chinese and Chinese-Americans somehow represent or speak for a group, and it’s an impossible burden.”
flickr user futureatlas.com / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

It’s been about ten years since Peter Ho Davies came out with his first novel, The Welsh Girl. It was long-listed for the 2007 Man Booker Prize.

Now, Davies is out with his second novel: The Fortunes.

He offers four linked stories that explore what it means to be Chinese in America over the past century and a half. Three of the stories are built around people and events that actually happened.

Stateside 2.20.2017

Feb 20, 2017

Today we hear from Kalamazoo's mayor on the one-year anniversary of a shooting rampage. Then, a Michigan playwright is inspired by his parents' World War II love letters. Plus, the beloved game of Euchre! Why is it still a thing in Michigan?

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

A vintage snowmobile exhibit is on display on Saturday, Feb. 18 at Snowfest in Cedarville, Mich. in the Upper Peninsula. As you can see, the snow was already starting to melt.
Josh Hakala / Michigan Radio

Some folks in Michigan were walking around outside with t-shirts this past weekend, and just in case you haven't checked the calendar, it's February! It's just the latest chapter in the often unpredictable and strange weather here in the Great Lakes State.

File photo: A makeshift memorial near one of the shooting scenes in Kalamazoo, a Cracker Barrel restaurant.
WMUK

One year ago today, Kalamazoo found itself in the cross hairs of gun violence. Jason Dalton is charged with the shooting spree that left six people dead and two badly wounded.

Tonight, the city will remember those victims and survivors with a candlelight vigil.

Kalamazoo Mayor Bobby Hopewell joined Stateside to talk about how the city of Kalamazoo is doing and how the shootings changed the people who live there. 

Courtesy of David Kiley

Two young people kept their love alive throughout World War II with letters – hundreds of them.

David Mertl / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Get a group of Michiganders together, add a deck of cards, and chances are pretty good you'll wind up with a game of euchre.

It was once dubbed "the queen of all card-games" and was wildly popular in the late 1800s. But its popularity waned through the 20th century. That is, except in Michigan and a handful of Midwestern states, nicknamed the “Euchre Belt.”

If the Red Wings don't turn things around in the final 23 games of the season, the record of 25 straight seasons of playoff hockey at Joe Louis Arena will end.
Mark Goebel / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In all the four major sports, no team has had a longer streak of consecutive playoff appearances than the Detroit Red Wings.

The last 25 years, Red Wings fans have enjoyed playoff hockey in the spring, but that could be coming to an end.

Courtesy of Lydia Rae Levinson/Michigan Community Resources

The Next Idea

You can’t rebuild your home or your neighborhood without tools. But tools cost money.

Here’s a solution: a community tool-sharing program. “Shovel Share” is just that, and it’s a finalist in the Knight Cities Challenge.

Should the idea win, Shovel Share would create a network of tool-sharing centers around Detroit.

Stateside 2.17.2017

Feb 17, 2017

Today, we hear from Michigan's own Frontier Ruckus in the next rendition of our "Songs from Studio East" series. And, we learn why, if rewritten, a travel ban could mean doctor shortages in rural Michigan.

According to Chopra, diagnosis is a complicated process made only more difficult by time constraints.
Public Domain

President Trump’s immigration ban of seven countries with predominantly Muslim populations is causing consequences to healthcare.

An article for The Conversation outlines what’s at stake.

While the immigration ban is temporarily suspended by the courts, the authors of the article write that the travel ban has already had significant consequences.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

This week, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder admonished Republicans for rushing legislation to eventually eliminate the state income tax. Meanwhile Kalamazoo, Saginaw and Detroit schools are fighting possible closings. And to top it all off, President Trump hosted a dramatic press conference yesterday that left many scratching their heads.

According to Laura Reese, while Midtown Detroit is seeing some income growth, the rest of the city is only getting worse
Wikimedia user, Andrew Jameson / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Over the past several years, the conventional wisdom has been that Detroit is recovering. Every new restaurant, boutique store, or retail chain setting up shop in Detroit is offered as proof.

There’s a major flaw in that assessment.

The focus of recent development has been the city’s central business districts. Meanwhile, the people in the neighborhoods are not sharing in that prosperity. If anything, the plight of Detroit’s long-time residents has been getting worse.

Fishing on Lake Michigan.
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It’s supposed to be warm throughout the state of Michigan this weekend. Really warm: highs may breach 60 in the southeast corner of the state, while up in the U.P. temperatures could be in the low 50s.

If you’re looking for a good way to get outdoors and take advantage of our temporarily tropical climate, the state’s Department of Natural Resources has an idea for you:

The summer blast happens to coincide with the state’s winter free fishing weekend, during which angling on Michigan’s lakes, rivers and streams requires no fishing license.

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