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Stateside Staff

Stateside 11.22.17

2 hours ago

Today on Stateside, former MSU and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar pleads guilty to first-degree criminal sexual conduct. Then, Detroit artist Carl Wilson using powerful linoleum prints to tell overlooked stories. And, we'll go back to the first Detroit Lions Thanksgiving Day game. 

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

A Healthier Michigan / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

When the Detroit Lions host the Minnesota Vikings tomorrow, they’re continuing a Michigan tradition that goes back further than many of us can remember. How and when did this tradition of Thanksgiving football get started?

Mark Harvey, the state archivist at the Michigan History Center, joined Stateside to recount the history of the Thanksgiving game.

Pascal Maramis / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

How does loneliness impact your mental and physical health?

Dr. Farha AbbasiMichigan State University psychiatrist, believes loneliness is one of the greatest challenges we face as a society. She joined Stateside to share her work.

Carl Wilson linoart print
Carl Wilson

It's funny how the smallest details about someone we love can stay with us.

For example: a scent. Any whiff of Shalimar instantly makes Cynthia Canty think of her great-Aunt Verne because it was her signature perfume.

For artist Carl Wilson, it's the memory of the chewing gum his mother always had in her purse — and that led to the title for his first solo museum exhibition.

Today on Stateside, we discuss the sexual harassment claims about long-time Detroit Democratic Congressman John Conyers. Among other things, the Congressman is alleged to have used taxpayer money to settle a sexual harassment complaint made by a female staffer. And, a professor argues Eastern Michigan University's deal to boost online classes dilutes the value of degrees.

Mixtape: DeJ Loaf, Anna Burch, and Rebecca Goldberg

22 hours ago

Time for us to listen to some new music from Detroit area artists.

Our guides are Paul Young, founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine and executive editor Khalid Bhatti.

DeJ Loaf - “Changes”

USER F DELVENTHAL / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Colleges and universities are seeking ways to reach more students, and bring in more money.

One way to do that is to hire an outside company to market and support online programs. That company recruits students for online degrees branded with the name of that university.

Courtesy of the Michigan Cyber Civilian Corps

Think for a moment of what a cyber-attack would mean for business, for government, for health care systems. Without the internet, it'd be incredibly difficult to function.

That's why Governor Snyder recently signed a law creating the Michigan Cyber Civilian Corps (MiC3). Think of it as a volunteer fire brigade that's ready to be called up in the event of a cyber-attack or other internet threat.

2017 Traverse City Children's Book Festival
Jim Barnes / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan is one of the 15 states plus the District of Columbia to have a Third-Grade Reading Retention Law.

Starting in 2020, a third-grader who doesn't meet a certain reading proficiency level will have to repeat that grade.

In response, schools are preparing for a potential surge in English Language Learner (ELL) students who may be held back because of the law.

Today on Stateside, the president of Kalamazoo College explains why it's baffling to him that Congress would try to impose a "tax on knowledge." And, we learn how a third-grade reading law could hold back 70 percent of English language learners.

Matthew Murphy

Right now, all over Michigan, countless high schools are putting on their fall theater productions. Acting in a school play can help a kid discover something she never knew she had inside. Someone who’s shy can somehow find the key to shining on stage, and it’s something that can change the course of her life.

That’s what happened for Teri Hansen, when she auditioned for a play at Seaholm High School in Birmingham.

Ford Rouge Factory Tour in Dearborn
Nicole Yeary / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

Michiganders know well the effects of manufacturing’s decline in this country. 

But a new report points out ways to ensure manufacturing stays alive here, and with 1-in-7 workers in our state still employed in this sector, it’s a challenge that we need to address. 

The report is called Making it in America: Revitalizing U.S. manufacturing. It was released this month by the McKinsey Global Institute, a leading private-sector think tank.

The report examines what hurt manufacturing in the past, and explores where it might go in the future.

MGoBlog / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio’s sports commentator, joined Stateside today for a roundup of the week’s sports news.

D Borz / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Congress is now considering two different tax reform bills, with pressure from the president to get a final version on his desk before year's end.

Universities and colleges are worried that both the House and Senate tax plans could threaten higher education. Of special concern: a proposed 1.4-percent excise tax on wealthy private college endowments.

Today on Stateside, we hear how the USDA is working to regain trust of minority and female farmers. And, after thinking his career was over, Jeff Daniels explains he's now busier than ever. 

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

It’s pretty hard to live in Chelsea, Michigan and not know Jeff Daniels. He’s an accomplished actor both on stage and on screen, he’s a musician who frequently tours, and he founded the Purple Rose Theatre in Chelsea.

Daniels joined Stateside to explain what’s been keeping him so busy.

Courtesy of Tim Herd

Recently the Annie E. Casey Foundation released a report that found Michigan’s African-American kids are struggling in school.

There’s a nationwide disparity between the education kids of color and white kids receive. If kids of color end up at a predominantly white college, it’s not clear they will get the resources and support they need.

MICHAEL COYER / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

A few weeks ago, we talked with a specialist in underserved farmers at Michigan State University’s Center for Regional Food Systems. Shakara Tyler mentioned a class action lawsuit against the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that alleged discrimination against black farmers.

That case is called the Pigford lawsuit. It claimed USDA loan officers and agents denied loans, lost applications, delayed applications, and otherwise discriminated against African-American farmers. After all was said and done, the settlement with the USDA was the largest federal settlement for civil rights violations in the nation.

By rallying hunters, one man has donated more than half a million meals to shelters. He joined Stateside today. Also on the show, we learn why one group is putting books in laundromats and why Detroit's housing demolition program is "partially to blame" for rising lead levels in the city's kids.

A dive team works on Line 5 under the Straits of Mackinac.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

It’s been a steady drip-drip-drip of revelations from Enbridge Energy about its Line 5 — the oil and gas pipelines running beneath the Straits of Mackinac.

The latest revelation is that there are more spots where the protective coating has worn off — lots more spots, even though a year ago we were told there weren’t any coating gaps.

The latest admission from the Canadian energy company drew a quick response from a plainly exasperated Governor Snyder, who called Enbridge’s “lack of transparency” to be “deeply troubling.”

But what are we hearing from Michigan's business leaders?

Libraries Without Borders-US

The Next Idea

Pretend it’s Saturday. 

You and the kids are running errands, including a several-hour stop at the laundromat. They are bored, you are bored.... What if you could use that washer time for something like education? What if your laundromat had the services of a library? 

Well, over the summer, this started happening in Detroit. 

Courtesy of City Rescue Mission of Lansing

Think about this: providing enough meat to make more than half a million meals for people in need. That's over 100,000 pounds of meat, and much of it is venison.

That's the remarkable result of of Tom Cullimore's work through his effort called HOPE: Help Other People Eat. 

Stateside Staff / Michigan Radio

When a child who has grown up speaking Spanish comes to school, that student is going to be sitting in English-only classrooms, being mainstreamed into the English language and culture.

How does this English-all-the-time approach affect those students?

Larry Nassar in court in recent months with his attorneys, Shannon Smith and Matthew Newburg.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

For the 120-plus women and girls who were allegedly abused by former Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar, it’s overwhelming to think that he may actually admit to assault as early as next week.

Nassar, who also worked as the doctor for the US Olympic women’s gymnastics team, is scheduled to have a plea hearing in Ingham County Circuit Court next week, where he’s facing more than a dozen charges, including multiple counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct involving a child under the age of 13.

As thousands of hunters head out with rifles today, a tiny group of Michiganders heads out with birds instead. We talk with one of those falconers on Stateside​. Also today, an ecologist says biodiversity could be the planet's "insurance policy," but only if we act fast. And, we learn Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar is considering a guilty plea to charges he sexually assaulted young athletes.

Wikimedia Commons

This Saturday, some 70,000 people will pack Ford Field in Detroit.

They'll witness a ceremony called beatification. It will elevate a humble Capuchin priest to the title of Blessed.

When Father Solanus Casey becomes Blessed Solanus, he will be one step away from Catholic sainthood, something no American-born priest has accomplished.

Courtesy of the Northern Indiana Center for History

When you’re a leader, the decisions you make, for better or for worse, have lasting repercussions that echo into the future. And if you ask the descendants of Leopold Pokagon, they’ll testify he made the right decisions.

With November being Native American History Month, we wanted to discuss the story of Pokagon, a Potawatomi leader in the early 19th century. 

Researchers manipulating the number of plant species in an experimental plot to determine how biodiversity impacts the productivity of ecosystems.
David Tilman

Biodiversity.

It's one of those scientific terms we hear and think, "That's a good thing. We need it,” without truly knowing why it's a good thing.

A University of Michigan and Smithsonian study now helps us understand. The researchers found biodiversity is even more powerful and important than they thought it would be.

Courtesy of Chris Wysocki

Firearm deer season starts today and thousands of hunters are heading out with their rifles. But around this time of year, there's a tiny group of Michiganders heading out with birds instead.

Today on Stateside, a pipeline safety expert says the latest Line 5 controversy is about lack of trust and transparency. And, we hear venison recipes and cooking tips from the chef of Traverse City's Trattoria Stella.

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