Stateside Staff

Stateside 8.15.2016

Aug 15, 2016

 

Today on Stateside, experts question and praise the 14-year I-75 highway reconstruction project, which begins today, and, we hear from a painter who's created a superhero called "the N-Word".

Stateside 8.12.2016

Aug 12, 2016

Today, we reflect on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton's visits to Michigan this week. And, we learn about rising out-of-pocket health care costs. 

Flickr user Chealion/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

For the first time, researchers show how much patients with private insurance actually pay for hospital stays. Out-of-pocket costs are high and rising fast for many plans, even those considered “good” insurance.

Emily Adrion is a research fellow at the University of Michigan medical school. She and her team looked at the rising out-of-pocket costs for people with private insurance.

Costs are rising in two main areas: deductibles and co-insurance.

To begin with deductibles, Adrion said they rose by around 86% between 2009 and 2013.

The 25-foot statue inspired by the photograph "V-J Day in Times Square" is on display in New York City. The statue will be on display in Royal Oak until the end of the year.
Carl Deal / MichiganWW2Memorial.org

On Monday, Aug. 15, Americans across the country will celebrate the 71st anniversary of V-J Day, victory over Japan.

August 15, 1945 was a massive celebration, and one of the most famous photographs from that day -- or of any day in our country's history -- is "V-J Day in Times Square," which was taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt. The photo shows a sailor and a nurse sharing a celebratory kiss in Times Square. 

A 25-foot statue commemorating the kiss is currently on display at Memorial Park in Royal Oak until the end of the year. The massive bronze statue is the centerpiece of the event "Kissing the War Goodbye," when the public is encouraged to show up, dressed as sailors and nurses, to recreate the kiss.

KWA pipes
STEVE CARMODY / MICHIGAN RADIO

Earlier this week, Stateside's Cynthia Canty spoke with Wayne State University professor Peter Hammer about a paper he wrote which argued that the Michigan departments of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services weren't the only players in the events that led to the lead contamination of Flint's drinking water. 

Among the entities mentioned in that paper was the Department of Treasury, which made many of the final decisions leading up to the switch to the Flint River for a water supply. 

It also mentioned the Karegnondi Water Authority, the entity building a pipeline from Lake Huron to Genesee County.

Sanilac Petroglyphs Historic State Park is home to prehistoric petroglyphs, a form of rock art made by carving, picking or otherwise removing part of a rock's surface.
michigan.gov

The least-visited park in the state is the site of some of its very oldest historic artifacts. 

The Department of Natural Resources, the Office of Historic Preservation, and members of the Saginaw Chippewa tribe want to encourage more visitors to come check out Sanilac Petroglyphs Historic State Park. 

Stateside 8.11.2016

Aug 12, 2016

Today, we look at the not-so-readily-apparent social costs of the Flint water crisis. And we learn how dark money groups try to influence your vote.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It's tough to wrap your mind around the price tag for Flint's lead-in-water disaster.

There's the $58 million the state of Michigan has already spent on filters, bottled water and medical care and testing.

There's the still-undetermined cost of replacing the water lines and pipes damaged by the corrosive Flint River water. 

But there are also social costs.

Marc Edwards, PhD, of Virginia Tech University, holds two vials of water, one from Flint and the other from Detroit. Edwards' research helped uncover the serious problems affecting Flint's water supply.
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Just three days before the federal disaster declaration expires in Flint, Virginia Tech water expert Marc Edwards has released the results of the latest water tests in Flint.

Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody joined us to explain the results.

He said the results don't really reflect a thumbs up or thumbs down for Flint's water quality.

“It was more something in between," he said. "Marc Edwards talked about the results and how they show that lead levels are coming down, and now the city is somewhat below the federal action level. But, again, much like Flint water itself, the answer is rather murky.”

Courtesy of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network

It looks like dark money groups were hard at work trying to influence your vote during last week’s primary – particularly targeting Republicans running for the State House.

Craig Mauger heads up the Michigan Campaign Finance Network.

“This was an effort, a well-orchestrated effort, to keep extremely conservative candidates out of the House GOP caucus,” Mauger told us.

He sat down with us today to talk about what role these secret donors play, and why they’re so hard to identify.

Flickr user hang_in_there/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

When you or someone in your family feels sick, chances are the first call you make is to your primary care physician.

Ever since 2010, Michigan has been a big part of a demonstration project to make primary care better, to keep people healthier and out of hospitals.

So often we hear people say, "Our immigration system is broken." But what exactly does that mean? 

In this State of Opportunity special, we hear answers to that question from various angles.

Stateside 8.10.2016

Aug 10, 2016

So often we hear people say, "Our immigration system is broken." But what exactly does that mean? In this State of Opportunity special, we hear answers to that question from various angles.

Stateside 8.9.2016

Aug 9, 2016

Today, we talk about Donald Trump's speech Monday night in Detroit. And, we learn about a treatment method that could help opioid addicts overcome pain.

Barbara Lucas

 

As the Olympics approached, Ann Arbor was a hive of training activity for a group of New Zealand athletes. They were drawn to the University of Michigan for the chance to work with retired men’s track and field coach Ron Warhurst.

Warhurst helped New Zealand runner Nick Willis win a silver medal in the 2008 Olympics. Willis' success encouraged countrymen Julian Matthews and Hamish Carson to travel from New Zealand to Michigan and work with Warhurst in the hopes of qualifying for their first Olympics.

Warhurst’s coaching paid off — Willis, Matthews and Carson all flew to Rio to compete in the men’s 1500 for their country.

Rashida Tlaid says Donald Trump's rhetoric has caused damage that will take years to address.
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Donald Trump came to Detroit to give a speech. For Michiganders opposed to Trump and what he stands for, it was a chance to speak back. 

Some 300 protestors gathered to chant outside Cobo Center as Trump spoke to the Detroit Economic Club. 

And nearly 20 women took their protest inside, interrupting Trump and eventually getting escorted outside by Secret Service. 

Among those kicked out of Monday's speech was former Democratic State Representative Rashida Tlaib, who was there as a part of Moms Against Trump.

According to Jay Greene, the biggest turnaround for hospitals was in Southeast Michigan because the number of uninsured people dropped so significantly.
Phalinn Ooi / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

It's been more than two years since the Healthy Michigan Plan opened the Medicaid rolls to over 600,000 low-income Michiganders. What has this meant for the financial health of Michigan's hospitals and health plans?

According to Jay Greene of Crain's Detroit Business, the numbers show that hospitals are thriving under the Affordable Care Act and the Healthy Michigan Plan.

A Flint water protest
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Marc Lamont Hill says we're in the midst of a war in America -- a war being waged on the vulnerable, the destitute, the struggling. Hill is a journalist and a political contributor to CNN.

Most often, he says, those vulnerable people are black, immigrant, LGBT and poor. Easily overlooked. Nobody. 

Marc Lamont Hill explores what life is like in 21st century America if you're nobody. 

Economist Charley Ballard said Trump's economic speech failed to address a modern economy.
Flickr user Gage Skidmore / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 


Donald Trump had the opportunity to lay out his economic vision for America at the Detroit Economic Club on Monday.

 

But his speech garnered criticism, including from Michigan State University economist Charley Ballard.

Mark Ilgen says ImPAT is a "psychotherapeutic ... non-pharmacological approach" to helping people adapt to and cope with their pain.
flickr user frankileon / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's become clear that America is in the grips of an opioid addiction epidemic.

But here's a dilemma: what if you're in pain? Is there a way to help patients get relief from pain without resorting to powerful pain medicines that can get you addicted?

A new study indicates the answer could be yes, through something called ImPAT, or Improving Pain during Addiction Treatment. 

Stateside 8.8.2016

Aug 8, 2016

 

Today, we look into what really happened after expanding Medicaid under Healthy Michigan. And, we hear about a new report scrutinizing the treasury department's role in the Flint water crisis.

When the Affordable Care Act became law, many thought hospitals would be overwhelmed by new patients. The data show otherwise.
Flickr user Lisa Larson-Walker/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Healthy Michigan Plan launched in April 2014. It opened the Medicaid rolls to hundreds of thousands of low-income people for the first time. And no one was quite sure what to expect.

There were widely held fears that the flood of previously uninsured people would make it harder for everyone to get doctor's appointments, and that hospitals would be overloaded with seriously sick patients who, until then, didn't have insurance coverage.

Now, two years down the road, there's enough data for experts to study and analyze.

Pam Rossi's new book collects her conversations with musicians on her radio show Over Easy.
Flickr user Ministerio TIC Colombia / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

Pam Rossi has produced and hosted Over Easy on Detroit classic rock station WCSX for the last 12 years. The show brings local, national and international musicians into the studio to talk and perform.

Now, she’s sharing those great conversations with great musicians in her book, Conversations with Pam Rossi.

Marilyn Monroe
Flickr user METROPOLITIAN TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

The headlines were huge and screaming on April 21 this year: Prince, found dead in an elevator in his home.

Cause of death? An opioid overdose.

 

And before that, there was June 25, 2009. More screaming headlines: Michael Jackson died from an overdose of propofol, which helped him sleep, and anti-anxiety drugs called benzodiazepines.

 

The headlines from 54 years ago told the same sad tale: film star Marilyn Monroe found dead in her Hollywood home.

The cause? An overdose of prescription drugs.

Michigan’s Treasury Department deserves blame for its role in the Flint water crisis, according to a new report.
Flickr user Ian Freimuth / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

As the Flint water crisis unfolded, most of the blame was heaped upon the state departments of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services.

But Wayne State University law professor Peter Hammer claims there’s another government agency at fault: Michigan’s treasury department. In a new report, Hammer faults Treasury for its willingness to bend rules when it came to the Karegnondi Water Authority (KWA) pipeline, and its indifference to whether the city could pay to upgrade treatment plants and guarantee safe drinking water.

Stateside 8.5.2016

Aug 5, 2016

Today, we reflect on the life and career of Detroit musician Allan Barnes. And, we learn about the role Lake Michigan played in training WWII pilots.

Dan Bach / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Michigan State University and Wayne State University have joined a growing list of schools that are no longer requiring college algebra to earn a degree. Engineering students, and the like, will still be required to take plenty of math, but if you are a history or an English major who doesn't like algebra, then you can rest easier.  

This wreckage of a World War II plane was pulled from the bottom of Lake Michigan.
Courtesy of John Davies

When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941, America was pulled into World War II. But, the military needed -- among other things -- pilots. In particular, the U.S. needed pilots who could land and take off from aircraft carriers. But the carriers the U.S. had at the time were desperately needed in the theater of war.

So, how to train the pilots?

That’s the subject of a new documentary Heroes On Deck: World War II on Lake Michigan.

Allan Barnes
Courtesy of Tate McBroom

Allan Barnes, Detroit jazz multi-instrumentalist and founding member of The Blackbyrds, has died. He was 66.

Detroit drummer and Gorilla Funk Mob co-founder Tate McBroom played with Barnes for almost 10 years. 

Listen above, as McBroom shares insights and perspectives on Barnes' musically diverse career.

Gov. Rick Snyder
gophouse.com

Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas​ joined us again today to talk about this week in politics. 

Primary voter turnout

Only 19% of all voters in Michigan showed up to vote in this past Tuesday's primary election, following a 34% turnout for the presidential primary earlier this year.

Demas described the low level of voter participation as “sadly predictable.”

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