WUOMFM

Stateside Staff

Howard County Library System Follow / FLICKR - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

The key to a successful future for Michigan includes turning out graduates with skill sets needed to fill the jobs of the future. It also includes increasing access to postsecondary education for low-income, first-generation, and underrepresented students.

The upcoming Michigan Pre-College and Youth Outreach Conference will explore these challenges, and will focus on the urgency of college access.

Keith Allison / FLICKR - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

He was one of the most beloved of Detroit's pro athletes before he left.

Now, Justin Verlander is going to be sporting a World Series ring thanks to that trade a couple months ago that sent him to the Houston Astros. The team beat LA in game seven last night to win the series.

Today on Stateside, we learn how Michigan is fighting hepatitis A to prevent its spread. And, we look back at the history of the Mackinac Bridge in honor of its 60th birthday. Also on the show, we discuss the court-martial that begins today for the Marine drill instructor accused of abusing Muslim recruits.

Courtesy of the Dick Tyler Collection in the Michigan History Center Archives

Happy 60th birthday to an iconic Michigan landmark: the Mighty Mac!

State archivist Mark Harvey joined Stateside to fun facts about the Mackinac Bridge in honor of its birthday.

COURTESY OF THE SIDDIQUI FAMILY

On March 18, 2016, new Marine recruit Raheel Siddiqui of Taylor died after falling in his barracks on Parris Island, South Carolina. 

A coroner ruled the fall was suicide, but Siddiqui's family insists that he was a devout Muslim and would never have committed suicide. They've filed a $100 million lawsuit against the Marines in their son's death.

The investigation into Siddiqui's death and other incidents involving Muslim recruits has led to the biggest hazing scandal on Parris Island since six recruits drowned there during a nighttime march in April 1956.

A court-martial for Raheel Siddiqui's drill instructor Gunnery Sgt. Joseph Felix began Tuesday at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Gunnery Sgt. Joseph Felix is accused of slapping Siddiqui just before the fatal fall.

Charlotte Mandziuk
Nicole Mandziuk

Charlotte Mandziuk is spreading kindness on the playground. She's a fifth-grader at Maltby Intermediate School in Brighton, and by taking careful note of hurtful things that can happen during recess, she came up with a way to include everyone in the recess activities.

The result: Recess K.L.U.B., which stands for Kindness and Leadership Uniting Buddies.

Ariel Dovas / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Digital technology has infused our lives. And while it brings many benefits, we’re paying a price for having our brains constantly plugged into the digital world. At special risk: children and adolescents.

Just what is the effect of screen time on kids and parents, and what should we do about it?

Chandra Krishnan / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley today activated the State Emergency Operations Center to coordinate the state’s response to an outbreak of hepatitis A.

On this Halloween day, we hear how hauntings and paranormal activities abound in Michigan. We also learn about the honor system state legislators have when it comes to spending campaign donations. And, researchers explain what sheep have to do with a possible cure for Huntington's Disease.

Courtesy of the filmmakers

A new documentary film from brothers Adam and Zack Khalil tells the stories of the Ojibway tribe in their hometown of Sault Ste. Marie. They use ancient prophecies of the Ojibway to explore modern Anishnaabe culture and its challenges.

Adam Khalil talks with Stateside about his documentary film INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place/it flies. falls./]. 

Dani Mettler / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

There's no way to sugarcoat a diagnosis of Huntington's Disease. When a patient has it, they know they're dying from it.

The nerve disease can't be cured, and it causes mental illness and a host of physical symptoms as it progresses.

Yet there's a potentially promising front in the war on Huntington's: sheep.

MICHIGAN STATE POLICE

They've been described as "obnoxious and counterproductive," and that was from the former lawmaker who helped pass legislation authorizing Michigan's Driver Responsibility Fees.

Now, the Michigan District Judges Association has weighed in against these fees. The judges have sent a letter to Governor Snyder asking him to get rid of the fees, which they call an "outrageous burden" on the backs of Michigan's working class.

HTTP://WWW.SENATORJIMMARLEAU.COM/

It is against the law in Michigan for anyone who holds political office to use campaign funds to pay personal expenses.

That said, it can be challenging to figure out if this is happening when elected officials use campaign money to pay off credit card balances, and then skimp on the details.

Such is the case with Sen. Jim Marleau, R-Lake Orion, as outlined in a front-page story by Detroit Free Press reporter Paul Egan.

Traverse City State Hospital
Addie VanDreumel / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Everyone has their favorite local ghost stories: ghouls haunting Detroit’s Fort Wayne, a portal to hell at the old State Hospital in Traverse City, the witch’s curse on the Pere Cheney cemetery, or spirits wandering around The Whitney.

No one knows Michigan’s spooky side better than Daniel Mackin.

He’s the founder and lead investigator of the Michigan Area Paranormal Investigative Team.

Affordable Care Act enrollment opens this week for the first time under President Trump. Today on Stateside, we learn what's changed. And, Michigan Radio's sports commentator discusses the need for higher medical standards in the Big Ten.

Frederico Cintra / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Some of us turn to social media to stay connected with friends and family. Others use social media as a megaphone to spread messages of hate.

Social media outlets wrestle with striking a balance. How do they allow free speech yet not let trolls and haters wreak their havoc? Just banning the troll doesn’t make much of a difference. It’s easy to change a screen name and jump right back out there lobbing hate-filled posts.

What if the focus shifted from cracking down on the trolls to taking away their online hangouts? A recent study by researchers at Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Michigan explored that very question.

A football.
Innovation_School / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today is the day for Stateside’s weekly sports roundup with John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio’s sports commentator.

Empty classroom
Brad Wilson / FLICKR - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

What happens to a school's biggest so-called troublemakers when they get lengthy suspensions or are kicked out altogether? Where can they go?

One place is Lighthouse Academy in Kent County. It's mission statement: "Creating hope through academic success in spite of life's storms."

Digital_Third_Eye / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Next Idea

One of the central challenges in Detroit’s revival: making sure that all boats rise. That good things are happening for long-time Detroiters, not just the newcomers and new businesses setting up in the city.

Capital Impact Partners created its Equitable Development Initiative after realizing how little of its money went to projects led by minority developers. The program is designed to bring more minority developers into Detroit’s revitalization.

Exam room.
Brandy Berthelson / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This Wednesday marks the start of the open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare.

This fifth enrollment season is the first one under President Trump, and it’s marked by what critics call his efforts to undermine the ACA.

Marianne Udow-Phillips from the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation joined Stateside to walk us through what to expect.

Listen above for the full conversation, or read highlights below.

Today on Stateside, an author details the "ecological unraveling" of the Great Lakes. We also hear why Detroit was the "obvious choice" for the inaugural Women's Convention, and how state regulators could shift the medical marijuana industry to benefit some and keep others out. Also today, Sen. Gary Peters joins the show and says, "We can't just have an open blank check for military use around the world."

Marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

In Lansing, lobbyists, big business, and small caregivers are jockeying to influence rules for growing and dispensing medical marijuana.

At the same time, lawmakers are considering beating voters to the punch by approving recreational marijuana in a way that could be very business friendly.

Don Harder / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

​Some members of the Legislature want to eliminate the elected Michigan Board of Education. They say the Board of Education has become little more than a debating society. But, if it’s so irrelevant, one has to wonder why those legislators get so worked up about the education board’s actions.

Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and the former Republican majority leader in the state Senate, along with Vicki Barnett, the former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator, joined Stateside to discuss the Board of Education.

COURTESY OF TASHMICA TOROK

The organizers of the Women's March are holding the inaugural Women's Convention at the Cobo Center in Detroit. It starts today and runs through the weekend.

Phoebe Hopps, a Michigan coordinator of the Women's March, said Detroit was an "obvious choice" for the convention.

Senate Democrats / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

With the controversy surrounding President Donald Trump’s call to a grieving military widow, lost in many of the conversations was where the soldier actually was stationed. He was in Niger, a landlocked country in western Africa with over 20 million citizens. Few Americans knew the U.S. military had any presence there.

Senators still have unanswered questions. The U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee was briefed by two top Pentagon officials about U.S. military presence in West Africa.

St. Lawrence Seaway
Kunal Mukherjee / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Even among those who live in the Great Lakes State, there is a lot of confusion about the health of the Great Lakes.

Some believe that because the lakes are clearer than ever, they’re more healthy, when in fact that clarity is due to invasive species killing off the bottom of the food chain.

Today on Stateside, the state agriculture chief warns against scrapping NAFTA, and the only female wrestler at UM Dearborn explains why she's fighting for a chance to compete against men. Also today, we recap Detroit's only mayoral debate with one of the panelists who questioned the candidates last night.

University of Michigan Professor Rosina Bierbaum says scandals like Flint's water crisis have eroded public trust in the safety of drinking water
Courtesy of Raiz Up

There's a political and legal battle happening over Flint's drinking water.

U.S. District Judge David Lawson ordered Flint's City Council to choose a long-term source of drinking water, scolding the council for taking so long to green light the city's deal with the Great Lakes Water Authority.

The Council punted this week, okaying a short-term deal with the GLWA. But the tug of war between Flint's Mayor Karen Weaver, the council, the state, and Judge Lawson continues.

Migrant farmworkers live and work on Michigan farms during the harvest.
Craig Camp / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

One of President Trump’s key campaign promises was to rewrite the North American Free Trade Act to be a better deal with the United States, or he promised to scrap the trade pact with Canada and Mexico.

Talks are happening right now to renegotiate the trade deal, and Jamie Clover Adams wants to make sure that Michigan agriculture is protected, no matter what happens to NAFTA.

Sunflowers on the shoulder of a highway
Jocelyn Hall / MDOT

The Next Idea

Scientists have known for a while that America’s bee population is in trouble — some types are even ending up on the endangered species list. Pollinator insects like bees are crucial to food production, and, in agricultural states like Michigan, keeping that population alive and healthy is a big deal.

A small but colorful pilot project at the Michigan Department of Transportation aims to provide some late season meals for those hard-working bees. 

Pages