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Stateside Staff

Stateside 1.4.2018

Jan 4, 2018

Congress is starting the New Year with a hangover from the old one. Today on Stateside, we get the Democrats' take on the issues from Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint. And, we learn how Battle Creek students are getting emotional and social support in a new type of classroom.

U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It’s a New Year, but for Congress, it all begins with a hangover from the Old Year: problems and issues left unresolved.

The government is due to run out of funding on January 19, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program ends in March, and looming over everything, this week's erratic tweetstorm from President Trump.

To see how Congress plans to deal with all this, Stateside talked to Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee of Flint.

You can listen to the full conversation above, or read highlights below.

Eric Neitzel / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

 

Time's running out on the American car.

That's the conclusion drawn by Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes after the automakers released their year-end sales results, and after some news coming out of the Ford Glass House.

Stateside 1.3.2018

Jan 3, 2018

Should you worry about catching hepatitis A at Southeast Michigan restaurants? That answer comes today on Stateside. Also today, we learn that without a legislative fix, the new federal tax bill could mean Michiganders pay higher state income taxes. And, a sex trafficking victim advocate says, "There's no place for rescued kids and that's horrible."

michigan state capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The new federal tax bill could mean lower federal taxes, but Governor Snyder and some economists say that it could lead to higher state income taxes.

That’s stirring up fresh talk in Lansing about cutting Michigan’s personal income tax to cushion the effects of the federal tax reform.

Central Station in Detroit
Gordon / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

Thirty years ago this week, on January 5, 1988, the last train left Michigan Central Station. That moment marked the end of nearly 75 years of Michiganders catching trains at the once-proud station.

Dan Austin, who has written three books about Detroit history and founded HistoricDetroit.org, and Mark Harvey, state archivist from the Michigan History Center, joined Stateside to discuss the station's legacy.

Rob White / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

In this era of texting and tweeting, we’re at risk of losing some of the marvelous words that add texture and meaning to conversation and writing.

A good place to begin to up our collective language game is by checking out the newest list from the Wayne State University Word Warriors. The group dug around in the linguistic cellar to recover neglected words that deserve a place in 2018.

Mindy Osantowski
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

As a young girl, Mindy Osantowski was a victim of sex trafficking at the hands of her then-step father. As a survivor and advocate in West Michigan, she sees major holes in the state’s awareness and care for current sex trafficking victims, especially young boys.

Yes, 2018 has arrived! Time to look back at some highlights from West Michigan’s music scene in 2017 as well as looking forward to some artists generating attention as the new year unfolds.

Top West Michigan musicians of 2017

It wouldn’t be a stretch to say this was a banner year musically for the west side of the state, which already had produced stars like BØRNS, a native of Grand Haven who continues to electrify the pop scene from his new home in Los Angeles.

Stateside 1.2.2018

Jan 2, 2018

2018 feels like a monumental year in politics. Today on Stateside, we discuss which way Michigan voters will swing. Also today, a psychologist explains why we're so easily fooled by fake stories online. And, we hit the streets to capture some of our fellow Michiganders' hopes and dreams for the new year.

phone with social media apps
Jason Howie / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

 

How do we sort out fact from fiction on social media? Do we really want to? It seems that people are quickly and happily sharing things online that are pure fiction without question and without a critical thought.

 

Stateside host Cynthia Canty found herself asking these questions recently when something came up on her Facebook feed. Some friends shared a story describing an airplane flight crew "taking a knee," walking off the plane, and stranding the New Orleans Saints: the flight crew's "protest" of players kneeling during the National Anthem.

 

Somebody would share the story, and then his friends would pile on, saying, “Yeah, that'll show them what America is about.”

REBECCA WILLIAMS / MICHIGAN RADIO

There are about 32,000 islands in the Great Lakes. About 30 of them have year-round residents – people who stick it out through the long winter.

Now, Great Lakes islanders are banding together.

Jim Caldwell
A Healthier Michigan / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

 

 

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio sports commentator, joined Stateside today to bring us our first sports update of the new year.

 

Listen above for the full conversation, or catch highlights below.

 

On Caldwell's firing

 

“I've been calling for it for a while. Very likable guy by all accounts. The players love the man. The Ford family, not a small thing of course in this case, loves the guy," Bacon said, "He's a genuinely decent guy, however he did not succeed at the Indianapolis Colts, he did not succeed at his previous stop coaching for Wake Forest in the college ranks, and he failed at Detroit with a fair amount of talent Detroit now has."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

What will this New Year bring in Michigan politics?

To answer that question, Stateside turned to Michigan Radio’s It’s Just Politics team, Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta.

They discussed the political stories likely to surface in 2018, including the upcoming election and how Washington might influence state politics this year.

Today on Stateside, Michigan Radio's sports commentator explains why Detroit was your city in 2017 if you like mediocrity in sports. And, a father says former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar assaulted his teenage daughter while under criminal investigation. 

KATE WELLS / Michigan Radio

This week we learned that even as Michigan State University Police conducted a criminal sexual conduct investigation of former doctor Larry Nassar, the university allowed him to continue seeing patients.

That investigation went on for more than a year, and

it appears Nassar assaulted at least 12 victims during that time.

A father named Tony joined Stateside today, and said his daughter was one of those assaulted by Nassar during this time period. She is now a 16-year-old who lives in Mid-Michigan. She once loved gymnastics, but no longer.

Detroit People Mover
Sönke Biehl / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

 

 

Daniel Howes, Detroit News business columnist, joined Stateside to look at Detroit's year in review. He shared his takeaways about Detroit's progress post-bankruptcy and what to look forward to in Detroit's future from the auto industry and its neighborhoods.

Keith Allison / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

To sum up the year in sports, Michigan Radio’s sports commentator John U. Bacon said this: “If you like mediocrity, I mean really like it, Motown is the place for you.”

He sat down with Stateside host Cynthia Canty to explain.

Michigan State Police car
Joe Ross / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

 

 

Murder charges have been filed against a former Michigan State Police trooper who shot his taser at at 15-year-old boy as the teen was fleeing from police on an ATV.

 

The ATV crashed into a parked truck and killed Damon Grimes.

 

Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy has charged former trooper Mark Bessner with one count of second-degree murder and two counts of involuntary manslaughter.

 

That second-degree murder charge carries a maximum sentence of life.

Author Doug Stanton
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The last American troops left Vietnam on March 29, 1973.

America's direct intervention in the Vietnam War was at an end, after many bloody years, and 58,220 American lives lost.

Afterward, the nation, and those Vietnam veterans, had a tough time processing and talking about this war that did not end with victory.

Today on Stateside, former Congressman and longtime tax reformer Dave Camp says the tax bill is a "positive move forward." And, did the federal government spend $21 trillion that wasn't authorized by Congress? And finally, we hear from the head of the "Harvard of Santa Schools."

Courtesy of Tyler Petroelje

Michigan has held one wolf hunt. That was in 2013, when 22 wolves were killed in the Upper Peninsula.

The next year, a federal judge put wolves back on the endangered species list.

Since then, lawmakers from Michigan, as well as Minnesota and Wisconsin, have tried to tack on riders to various bills in Congress that would "de-list" the wolves. These moves are backed by farmers who say wolves are preying on their livestock.

But now, a new study indicates those farmers may be contributing to that predation problem. How? By not burying their dead cows.

health insurance claim form
Franchise Opportunities / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

 

 

As he prepares to sign the newly-passed GOP tax bill, President Trump saluted the measure  by claiming it fulfills his campaign promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

 

The bill does away with the individual mandate that was a central component of the ACA.

dictionary entry for the word tax
Alan Cleaver / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

 

President Trump and Congressional Republicans are celebrating today after the House and Senate delivered an epic overhaul of our tax laws.

 

The GOP is hailing the package as a gift to the middle class, although the biggest tax cuts go to corporations and the wealthiest Americans.

 

Dave Camp is a former Michigan Congressman. He served in the House from 1991 to 2015.

 

Tax reform was one of his main priorities. In fact, he served four years as Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, the House's tax writing body. He is now a Senior Policy Advisor for PwC.

 

Santa House
Courtesy of the Charles W. Howard Santa Claus School

“He errs who thinks Santa enters through the chimney. Santa enters through the heart.”

So said the founder of the Charles W. Howard Santa School in Midland, Michigan.

Yes, you read that right. There is such a thing as Santa school, and the one in Michigan is the longest-running in the country. With students coming from as far as Australia and Denmark, it’s known as the “Harvard of Santa Schools.”

Pictures of Money / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Now that the GOP has gotten its tax reform plan passed, leaders like House Speaker Paul Ryan are saying the next item on the agenda is reining in government spending.

Perhaps the work of Michigan State University economist Mark Skidmore, his team of graduate students, and a former government official, will give them a place to start.

Skidmore and his team dug into government websites and reports, and they may have found unauthorized spending in the Department of Defense (DOD), and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to the tune of $21 trillion from 1998-2015.

PFAS chemicals have contaminated water across Michigan. Today on Stateside, we learn what that means for public health and clean up. And, in honor of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, we visit Terra Prime Light Armory in Ann Arbor, where athletes spar with lightsabers.

A rusty barrel in the woods
Bryce Huffman

On Monday, environmental activist Erin Brockovich spoke at a west Michigan town hall.

She was there in support of a class-action lawsuit filed against three companies – 3M, Wolverine Worldwide, and Waste Management.

The suit accuses them of dumping toxic waste and polluting the groundwater in several areas of Kent County with a family of chemicals known as PFAS, which stands for per-and-polyfluoroalkyl substances.

Mixtape: Colin Stetson, Stef Chura, and Royce da 5’9”

Dec 19, 2017
Courtesy of artists

Today on Stateside, we take an end-of-the-year listen to music from Detroit-area artists. Our guides, as always, are Paul Young, publisher of Detroit Music Magazine, and Khalid Bhatti, the magazine's executive editor. 

Listen to the full conversation above, or read highlights below.

Colin Stetson, “All This I Do for Glory” from All This I Do for Glory

Disruption Books, 2017

When it comes to protecting the environment, our existing laws have failed us.

So says environmental activist Maya van Rossum. In her new book, The Green Amendment, she says existing laws don't ban pollution or development.

She writes, "Industries are perfectly able to pollute the air and water not in spite of, but because of, the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act – they simply need the right permits to do so."

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