Stateside Staff

Muhammad Ali lived with Parkinson's Disease longer than his career as a boxer
Knowle West Media Centre / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

With the passing of Muhammad Ali, there has been no shortage of praise that has been heaped upon the boxing legend, who to many, was more than just a fighter. Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon says while his list of accomplishments in and out of the ring was worthy of admiration, it was how he lived his life in his later years that deserves the most credit. 

Ivan Moshchuk will perform at Orchestra Hall on June 9, in the first solo piano concert presented by ProMusic in over 10 years.
Marco Borggreve

Ivan Moshchuk has been playing piano publicly since he was a young teenager. 

Born in Russia and raised in Grosse Pointe, Moshchuk became the first Michigan artist to win the Gilmore Young Artists award in 2010. 

He's since gone on to perform in concert halls around the world.

Watch Moshchuk perform Prelude in B minor by J.S. Bach, arranged by Alexander Siloti:

Michigan Radio has a new Morning Edition host!

Thousands of Michiganders will now wake up to hear Doug Tribou manning the microphone.

Labels on nutrition labels will look a lot different over the next two years
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

The Food and Drug Administration is changing the design of the nutritional labels on the food you buy. To give us an idea of what changes, why the changes, and when we’ll see the changes is Laura Bix, a Packaging professor at Michigan State University

Among the changes, the new design is expected to make calorie and serving sizes more prominent and easier to find. Also, serving sizes are being adjusted to be more realistic to how people typically eat.

David Stanley is the author of "Melanoma: It Started with a Freckle"
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

There are few things scarier than hearing your doctor say, “You have cancer.”

David Stanley heard those words.  

He was diagnosed with melanoma. What did he do? He survived, and wrote a book to share the experience and serve as a warning. 

Gov. Rick Snyder at the 2016 Mackinac Policy Conference
Zoe Clark / Michigan Radio

Zoe Clark from It's Just Politics is at the Mackinac Policy Conference and there's been no shortage of news at what many would consider to be the Super Bowl for political junkies. Clark joined Stateside to discuss what hasn't been discussed that much over the last few days:  The city of Flint and the water crisis that continues there.

Governor Snyder at the Mackinac Policy Conference in 2014
flickr user A Healthier Michigan / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Detroit Regional Chamber's Mackinac Policy Conference wrapped up this morning. There was a lot of buzz up on Mackinac Island about an EPIC-MRA poll which finds Governor Snyder's disapproval rating is 52%.

Stateside 6.3.2016

Jun 3, 2016

Today, we speak with a melanoma survivor who wants others to learn from his experience. And, we learn about rising suicide rates among young people.

Ian Hartley
Courtesy of Julie Hartley

"Minding Michigan" is Stateside's ongoing series that examines mental health issues in our state. 

Stateside 6.2.2016

Jun 2, 2016

 

On Stateside today, we find out how Girls Group empowers young women to "ignore the noise" and be the first college graduates in their families.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

nearly one in every five DPS students  qualifies for some special education services
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The fight continues over a bailout package for Detroit Public Schools.

Today, the state House is attempting to hash out the differences between its rescue plan and the bipartisan plan passed by the state Senate.

At the heart of the fight is an amended Senate proposal for a Detroit Education Commission, a body that would set the same standards for closing down both failing public schools and charter schools in Detroit.

Clark Durant is co-founder of Cornerstone Schools, which runs charter schools in Detroit.

Flickr user Newman University/Flickr

The Next Idea

Hundreds of leaders have descended upon Mackinac Island for the Mackinac Policy Conference this week. Their aim is to explore solutions to Michigan’s problems, and education across the state has been a big talking point.

One of those leaders is Doug Rothwell, CEO of Business Leaders for Michigan.

Zoe Clark / Michigan Radio

In day two of the Mackinac Policy Conference, Governor Rick Snyder seems to be in full "RPA mode." That's "relentless positive action."

 

“You get a sense among folks here that the Governor is somewhat weakened and trying to find his way back,” said Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes, who is at the conference.

Richard T. James

The Tony Award for Excellence in Theatre Education was awarded to Detroit teacher Marilyn McCormick. She was picked out of 1,100 candidates who were nominated by people across the country. McCormick will be recognized during the live Tony Award broadcast on June 12. In addition, the Cass Technical performing arts program will receive a $10,000 grant.

 

Flickr user healthiermi/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Over 1,500 politicians, philanthropists, entrepreneurs and business people are at the Grand Hotel for this year's Mackinac Policy Conference. There will be three days of events and speakers, including Gov. Rick Snyder and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan.

 

Our It’s Just Politics team, Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta, describes the event as a "melting pot" of Michigan leaders.

Stateside 6.1.2016

Jun 1, 2016

Today on Stateside, we discuss how sometimes doing right by your kids means flipping conventional wisdom on its head.

Decaying sea walls on Lake Michigan in Chicago.
Flickr user Mike Boehmer/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Water levels in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron were at record lows three years ago. At the same time, water levels for the other Great Lakes were well below average.

This year is a bit different. Lake Michigan could be at a near-record high. The lake has risen four feet since that all-time low in January 2013.

Kathleen Torrenson is the president of Torreson Marine in Muskegon. She joined us today on Stateside to discuss how the changing water levels have affected her business and others located along the shoreline.

Torreson said these new high water levels are good for the boating business in the Great Lakes.

“It allows our customers and the people using the water a lot more flexibility in where they’re going and what they’re using,” she said.

But it’s not all good news.

“On the other side of the coin, high water tends to be really, really tough on fixed objects, like sea walls and fixed docks and things like that, things that were built when water levels were at other depths,” Torrenson said. “And as the water comes up and up, they become more prone to damage and erosion, kind of like what they’ve been seeing along the beaches.”

Torrenson said another effect of the sea level rise is that there’s “a lot less beach” compared to a couple years ago. Another flip side, however, is businesses like hers have had to do far less dredging to keep the lake deep enough for boats coming in near the shore.

Stateside 5.31.2016

May 31, 2016

Today, the Stateside test kitchen tried its hand at morel mushrooms. And, we learned about a plan to fix metro Detroit's public transit system.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

a golf ball and club
flickr user Krzysztof Urbanowicz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Market forces have decided that Michigan has too many golf courses.

An article in the Detroit Free Press last month looked at the boom of golf courses in recent decades turning into "a painful bust," as the headline reads.  

Jeff Manion speaking about his first book, "The Land Between," at the Willow Leitungskongress 2012
flickr user Willow Creek DC/H / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We all fail sometimes. No exceptions.

It's often hard to admit, but failure is an essential part of the human experience. 

That's what Failure:Lab is all about.

Asian Carp
Kate Gardiner / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

For nearly two decades, The Environment Report and its predecessor The Great Lakes Radio Consortium have been reporting about invasive species on Michigan Radio. More and more kinds of pests are being introduced into the lakes, often by cargo ships bringing in critters from foreign ports. And it's a lot more than just Asian Carp, which has received plenty of headlines in recent years. 

Stateside 5.27.2016

May 27, 2016

Today, we talk to a couple of Detroit Reacts activists at the Venice Biennale. Also, leaded water may be bad for you, but not so much for your garden.

Stateside 5.26.2016

May 26, 2016

 

On Stateside today, we eat crickets and learn why edible insects could become a staple food source in the future. 

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

FLICKR USER JASON MRACHINA / https://flic.kr/p/bUmnTg

David Maraniss’ earliest memories are in Detroit. He's the associate editor of the Washington Post. Maraniss lived in Detroit until he was six years old and remembers the strong taste of Vernor's. He remembers the Boblo boat.

His book Once in a Great City: A Detroit Story tells us what Detroit gave America. It also details the first signs of the city's troubles. Maraniss joined us on Stateside to talk about his strong feelings for the state and about the country’s view of Detroit.  

FLICKR USER CHRISTIAN JUNKER/ FLICKR / https://flic.kr/p/9S6x3L

The Detroit Metropolitan Airport has come a long way. The airport used to be less put together, but in 2002 it took off. Delta opened the McNamara Terminal that year. Then, in 2008, the North Terminal opened.

A 2014 study by the University of Michigan Dearborn found that DTW generated $10.2 billion in economic impact and 86,000 statewide jobs.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us today on Stateside to talk about the airport and its impact. He recently had a sit-down conversation with Delta CEO Ed Bastian.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette.
Bill Schuette / Facebook.com

The U.S. Justice Department, Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette and Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton have asked Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration to shut down its internal investigations into the Flint water crisis.

They say those internal administrative investigations may have damaged their criminal investigations. 

Flickr user Andrew McFarlane/Flickr

Steven Ford joined us today to discuss his father, the 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford.

On Friday, the film A Test of Character airs on National Geographic at 9 p.m. Eastern. It tells the story of President Ford and the challenging time in history during which he took office.

Flickr user LadyDragonflyCC - >;</Flickr

A group of communities in Detroit is working together to address climate change. The Detroit Climate Action Collaborative, a combination of people from private and public industries, has developed a Detroit Climate Action plan, which aims to make a cleaner, healthier Detroit while creating jobs and lowering costs.

Kimberly Hill Knott, project director for the Detroit Climate Action Collaborative, joined us today on Stateside. 

She said without action, and as the climate becomes more volatile, Detroit could see more events like the flood that hit the city in 2014. 

And action on climate change, Knott said, could prevent more than natural disasters.

Stateside 5.25.2016

May 25, 2016

Today, we learn that Gibson has not acknowledged the women who built guitars during World War II. And, we hear about the Beatles' Magical History Tour exhibit.

The Henry Ford

The Beatles have come to The Henry Ford Museum.

The Magical History Tour, a 10,000-square-foot exhibit that explores the full history of the iconic rock band is coming to Dearborn. The exhibit takes fans through the band's early days in Liverpool through its break-up in the 1970s and the solo careers that followed. 

While there are millions of fans of the band in the Great Lakes State, the number of significant connections to Michigan is relatively minimal (Paul McCartney has a Detroit Red Wings sticker on his guitar!). So why was Michigan chosen as the first stop on this tour? 

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