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Stateside Staff

Stateside 3.2.2017

Mar 2, 2017

Today we hear why, without EPA support, Lake Erie could become the "poster child of pollution" once again. And, we learn how singing, dancing and acting with young kids sets the stage for academic success.

Courtesy of Susannah Goodman

  The Next Idea

Get kids started at an early age with the arts and the payoff could be better math, science and literacy skills, in addition to better overall learning skills.

That’s the idea behind the Livings Arts' Detroit Wolf Trap Program. Its goal is to narrow the achievement gap between affluent and less-affluent areas through arts education.

VERTAS / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Government failed Flint.

It's pretty tough to dispute that statement, knowing what we know about how the Flint water crisis came to be, and how it was dismissed and denied by bureaucrats and officials at all levels of government.
 

Entrepreneur, investor and philanthropist Joseph Sanberg believes we should work through the boardroom to help address working-class problems, not just wait for government to fix things.

Tom Whitten / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

It's an especially precarious time for Lake Erie's future.

That's according to Jeffrey Reutter, an aquatic biologist and limnologist from Ohio State University who has studied the lake since 1971.

It's his belief that if we lose the EPA, we lose Lake Erie.

Courtesy of City of Detroit, Mayor's Office

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan recently made some significant claims against the city's former Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr. Duggan accused Orr and his team of misleading the city of Detroit on the future cost of pensions.

According to Grand Rapids Police Chief David Rahinsky, crime in Grand Rapids has been on the decline in recent years due, in large part, to the relationships that law enforcement has developed with immigrant communities.
Matthew Sutherland / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

"Don't be afraid to call us."

That's what Grand Rapids Police Chief David Rahinsky said in a recent meeting of anxious people at the Hispanic Center of West Michigan.

The meeting addressed concerns from people who don't know how and if President Trump's immigration crackdown involves local police agencies.

A forest.
Flickr user christopherpeplin / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In some parts of Michigan, there are forests that can take you back in time. Old-growth forests of towering trees offer a rare glimpse at what Michigan looked like before the logging boom of the late 1800's.

Donald Dickmann, a professor in Michigan State University's Department of Forestry, told Stateside where visitors can see stands of old-growth trees in Michigan.

chadrjohnson / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

State boards of education across the country are issuing draft plans on how to meet the requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the 2015 federal education law that set new national standards for K-12 schools.

The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) recently released its plan for complying with ESSA. The plan aims to make Michigan “a top 10 education state within 10 years.”

President Trump's first speech before a joint session of Congress delivered themes and promises that are very familiar.
Screen grab from YouTube.com

President Trump's first speech before a joint session of Congress delivered themes and promises that are very familiar. It was delivered in a tone many have remarked was more presidential and more aspirational.

Rep. Paul Michell (R) and Rep. Dan Kildee (D) joined Stateside to give a perspective of last night's speech from both sides of the aisle.

From the Republican side, Congressman Paul Mitchell, who represents Michigan's 10th District, said the speech "captured the aspirations of Americans."

Stateside 3.1.17

Mar 1, 2017

Michigan has the largest population in the world of starry stonewort, an invasive macroalgae that stifles native plants and fish. Today, we learn about the problems it creates in lake ecosystems. And, we get reviews of President Trump's speech to Congress from both sides of the aisle.

iivangm / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Across Michigan, a number of undocumented Mexican immigrants have been detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials.

While President Donald Trump indicated his order would deport criminals – “bad hombres,” as he put it –  there are reports that people with only minor violations are being picked up, even people with no apparent violations.

Flickr user katarzynab / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In the early 1980s, Larry Bell worked at Sarkozy Bakery in Kalamazoo. There he became interested in grains and yeast, and began experimenting with beers in his basement.

“My home brewing was getting a little out of control,” Bell said.

Bell, founder and president of Bell’s Brewery, pioneered Michigan’s reputation for making some of the nation’s boldest brews.

Courtesy of Scott Brown

Michigan has the largest population in the world of starry stonewort, an invasive macroalgae that stifles native plants and fish. 

Starry stonewort loves the clean, clear, and calcium carbonate rich waters of Michigan’s inland lakes. It grows in dense mats which can range in thickness from a few inches to a little over six feet.

Stateside 2.28.17

Feb 28, 2017

Attacks and threats to minority communities have been escalating. Today on Stateside, we'll hear from the Jewish Federation of Greater Ann Arbor. Plus, we'll talk with Michigan's chief economist who is retiring today about whether term-limited politicians really understand state finances. 

Jewish Community Center and Hebrew Day School in Ann Arbor, which received a bomb threat on February 27.
Kate Wells

 

In the last few weeks, intimidating acts have been aimed at Jewish and Muslim communities in Michigan. In Ann Arbor, a bomb threat forced the evacuation of a Hebrew Day School. In Dearborn, threats have been called into Muslim community centers and mosques.

Schaetzl said glaciers carved out all of Michigan's peninsulas.
Screen grab Google Maps / Google

What's the story behind Michigan's Thumb?

In this historical photo, a group stands outside of a drugstore on the corner of St. Aubin and Mullett streets on May 8, 1950 in Black Bottom, an area that was torn down in the 1950s to make way for the Chrysler Freeway and the Detroit Medical Center.
Burton Collection

In today’s Detroit Free Press, there's an article titled Bringing Detroit’s Black Bottom back to (virtual) life.

It tells the story of a young Detroit architect named Emily Kutil who's trying to bring a neighborhood that no longer exists back to life ... in digital form. 

COURTESY OF MICHIGAN DEPT. OF TREASURY

Michigan’s chief economist, Jay Wortley, is retiring after 36 years of state government service. During that time, the state has faced the triplicate challenge of a declining population, deurbanization in its major cities, and a series of employment swings in the all-important auto industry.

As chief economist, one of Wortley’s primary responsibilities was to accurately estimate future tax revenues based on forecasts of economic growth and recessions.

kevinwburkett / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

In May of 1936, when Detroit resident Charles Poole climbed into a car with Dayton Dean and Ervin Lee, he thought he was going to a meeting that might land him a position at an axle factory and a spot on the factory’s baseball team.

Unemployment in Michigan was high and Poole did not have a full-time job. Any opportunity for work was worth pursuing.

What Poole did not know was that Dean and Lee were members of an organization called the Black Legion. After driving to an unpopulated area outside of Dearborn, they took Poole out of the car and shot him.

Stateside 2.27.2017

Feb 27, 2017

Michigan has a choice to make: Make small cuts to energy use, or build new power plants. We'll hear about that decision today. And, the superhero Cyborg got a promotion a few years ago when he joined Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman as part of the Justice League. We learn what Detroit has to do with his history. Finally, what do ginseng, ferns and orchids have in common? Listen to learn.

Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

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Michigan has a law on the books that grants the police immunity from prosecution if they’ve had sex with a prostitute during an investigation.

Michigan is the only remaining state we know of which still grants that immunity, but that might change.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

 

A bill in the Michigan Legislature would require all state contractors and subcontractors to check the citizenship status of their employees. Bill sponsor State Representative Jim Runestad, R-White Lake, wants to prevent Michigan citizens from losing jobs to “black market” labor.

Courtesy of John Semper Jr.

In the D.C. Comics universe, Superman has Metropolis, Batman has Gotham, and now Cyborg has Detroit.

When D.C. rebooted its universe a few years ago, the superhero Cyborg got a promotion. He joined Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman as part of the Justice League and has become a higher-profile character. 

The origin of the term "gerrymandering" comes from a political cartoon from March of 1812. This was drawn in reaction to the newly-drawn state senate election district of South Essex created by the Massachusetts legislature to favor
J. Albert Bowden II / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

If you ask a roomful of voters if they think gerrymandering is an issue, it's a fair bet most of the people would raise their hands, regardless whether they were a Republican, Democrat, or independent.

There are several groups in the state looking at the issue for the 2020 the ballot. The group Voters Not Politicians is not waiting that long. It wants to put something on the ballot in 2018.

American Ginseng
Flickr user Forest Farming / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We know hunters who take deer or goose out of season are poachers. But what about those who take a plant from a park or a reserve without permission?

They too are poachers and plant poaching can be a huge, illegal business.

Liesl Clark said Michigan is taking more older, coal-fired power plants offline because they are uneconomical to run.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

The Next Idea

Michiganders might be using electricity the wrong way. A new report indicates Michigan might be able to meet projected energy shortfalls if residents change how they use power. That would save having to build new, expensive power plants.

WMUK

This week marked one year since a mass shooting in Kalamazoo County. A part-time Uber driver, Jason Dalton, is facing charges. The shooting spree killed six people and seriously injured two others. One of the injured is teenager Abigail Kopf.

Gene Kopf​, Abigail's father, joined Stateside to talk about his daughter's recovery.

Stateside 2.24.2017

Feb 24, 2017

Today, we learn why conversations about bias should talk about skin color, not "race." And, we discuss what's left of Fordlândia, the transplanted Midwestern town in the Amazon.

Jeso Carneiro / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

In the 1920s, demand for rubber shot way up. With more cars being made, the auto manufacturers needed rubber for tires, hoses and other things.

Henry Ford decided he would go right to the source for his rubber. In 1928, he planned a rubber tree plantation and what essentially was a model Midwestern town along the Amazon River in Brazil.

He called it Fordlândia.

TS ELLIOTT / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

We've had conversations on this program about race and racial tensions many times. But one scholar said we've got it all wrong. He said we shouldn't be talking about race; that's relatively meaningless. He wants to shift the conversation about bias from "race" to skin color.

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