WUOMFM

Stateside Staff

street facing Michigan capital
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing has become Michigan’s first official “sanctuary city.” Other cities, such has Detroit, have avoided that declaration and instead use terms such as “immigrant friendly” or “welcoming city." And there's a reason for that.

The term “sanctuary city” could put Lansing at risk of losing federal grants—all of them.

According to Studley, the problem with Lansing's sanctuary city resolution is that it did not include a clear definition of what a sanctuary city and that it raised more questions than it answered.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio file photo

The Michigan legislature is considering a number of controversial bills on topics as diverse as concealed weapons and vaccinations.

Our political roundup duo joined Stateside today, as they do most Fridays, to break down the bills. That duo includes Vicki Barnett, former mayor of Farmington Hills and former Democratic legislator, and Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and former Republican majority leader in the state Senate.

Flickr user spyker3292 / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Last September at the Bellamy Creek Correctional Center near Ionia, an inmate died. He’d been in some kind of confrontation with another prisoner.

Corrections officers used stun guns to subdue 24-year-old Dustin Szot, who was serving time for home invasion. An autopsy listed his death as a homicide due to blunt force trauma. That's according to a recent article by The Detroit Free Press' Paul Egan.

Stateside 4.6.2017

Apr 6, 2017

Today, we learn how heirloom seeds could strengthen our food system in the face of climate change and other weather events. We also hear about the "torture, abuse and suffering" that preceded the death of a young Marine recruit from Michigan. 

Michigan state Capitol building
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The meter continues to run on the state’s legal expenses for the Flint water disaster.

young woman at Science Gallery Lab
Courtesy of Jeff Grabill

The Next Idea

Science Gallery has been described as a place where science and art collide. The result? Creative ways to tackle some of the world's biggest problems.

The first Science Gallery Lab is in Dublin. Now, Michigan State University is launching Science Gallery Lab Detroit.

Raheel Siddiqui, a Pakistani-American Muslim from Taylor, was 11 days into his basic training with the United States Marine Corps on Parris Island in South Carolina when he died.
Courtesy of the Siddiqui family

“The physical evidence in this case tells the story of torture, abuse and suffering.”

That's the assertion of the lawyer representing the family of Raheel Siddiqui, a 20-year-old from Taylor who died while attending boot camp in South Carolina in March of 2016. According to the Marines, Siddiqui committed suicide by jumping 40 feet down a stairwell. 

His family is disputing those findings and now, his drill sergeant at Parris Island is facing charges.

The Wall Speaks / Wojtek Sawa

 

“If we can feel sad for what happened to children in Poland, we can equally feel sad about what is happening to children in the Middle East.”

That’s the message that artist Wojtek Sawa and community space owner Alissa Shelton want to bring to the people of Hamtramck.

A Tesla electronic car at a charging station
Austin Kirk / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's a tiny company packing a big punch with investors.

Electric car maker Tesla now has a higher market value than Ford. It's just behind General Motors at the top of the list. 

Courtesy of Nature and Nurture Seeds

As we ease our way into spring, gardeners might want to consider planting heirloom seeds.

That's Erica Kempter's advice to growers this year. She's co-owner of an organic seed farm called Nature and Nurture.

The result could be a chance to taste surprising and often forgotten foods that belong here in the Great Lakes region. 

Michigan History Center

100 years ago this week, the United States officially entered what was then called "The Great War." We know it today as World War I.

Stateside 4.5.2017

Apr 5, 2017

Today on Stateside, a woman with mental illness weighs in on the future of behavioral health services in Michigan. And, we learn how researchers aim to make rocket engines more stable (which will better our chances of getting to Mars).

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan: We are failing black college students. We can do better.

That's the warning from Kim Trent, a member of the Wayne State University Board of Governors. She laid out her concerns in a piece for MichiganFuture.org where she's a policy associate. It's titled "How Michigan fails black college students."

Thanks to the Community Mental Health Authority in Lansing, Jerri Nicole Wright is 26 years sober and is on the "road to recovery".
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The future of mental health in the state of Michigan is at a crossroads. Governor Rick Snyder has $2.4 billion in mental health care funding to spend. Lawmakers and advocates on both sides of the health care debate are trying to determine who should manage that money.

Jerri Nicole Wright is a Lansing resident and longtime consumer of state mental health service. She joined Stateside to talk about her journey through Michigan's mental health care system.

nasakennedy / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Two words can mean the difference between life and death when rockets blast into space: combustion instability.

That’s what makes rocket engines blow up.

Hospital bed
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

The weight of terminally-ill patients can play a role in the type of treatment they receive toward the end of their lives.

Courtesy of Clark Retirement Community / Facebook

In a unique effort to bridge the generation gap, three Western Michigan University occupational therapy students are more than six months into a 19-month stint living side-by-side with senior citizens at the Clark Retirement Community on Keller Lake.

It’s one of the first research projects of its type in the country.

Stateside 4.4.2017

Apr 4, 2017

A recent dip in auto sales could lead to production cuts, but today we learn why you shouldn't panic just yet. We also hear from the Port Huron man who claims he's still the world's greatest whistler, and the first American to win Japan's biggest poetry prize.

Association for Advancing Automation

Automation and robotics are playing an ever-increasing role in the workplace, particularly in manufacturing.

Jeffrey Angles (2nd from right) became the first American to win Japan's Yomiuri Prize for poetry.
Courtesy of Jeffrey Angles

The Yomiuri Prize, Japan's equivalent to the Pulitzer Prize, has honored exceptional literary works for nearly 70 years. Now, for the first time, an American took home the prize for poetry.

Ford Motor Company saw its sales drop by 7% from March of 2016, the most of the Big Three automakers.
Ford Motor Company

U.S. automakers sold 1.56 million new cars and trucks in March. That's down 1.6% from this time last year.

Courtesy of Ralph Giese

 


He calls himself the World's Greatest Whistler.

 

It’s hard to argue with that. Check out his song "Peanut Butter Blues" below.

 

Stateside 4.3.2017

Apr 3, 2017

Tonight, when March Madness officially ends, an anthem will play just as it has each year since 1987. On Stateside today, we hear from the Michigander who wrote the song. And, we learn how a Michigan woman's story of abuse forever changed America's view of domestic violence.

Mackinac State Historic Parks

When you step off the dock onto Mackinac Island, you’re setting foot on a land with a long, and sometimes troubled, history for Michigan’s first people.

There are new efforts underway to get visitors to look past the fudge shops and the quaint homes, to appreciate the Native American history on this island they call “Great Turtle.”

Public Act 343 makes Michigan the 32nd state to provide exonorees with compensation for time served.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Just try to imagine how it would feel to be accused of a crime. Wrongfully accused. You didn't do it. But you're convicted and sent to prison.

Then, miraculously, you get another shot and your innocence is proven.

You're released with absolutely no compensation, and no help re-entering the world outside of those prison walls.

That was the case in Michigan until just last week when Public Act 343 took effect. With that, Michigan became the 32nd state to provide exonorees with compensation for time served.

Wikimedia Commons

 


“All she wanted to do was leave.”

 

That’s how Barbara Niess-May, executive director of SafeHouse Center in Ann Arbor, described the case of Francine Hughes of Dansville, Michigan.

Flickr user Bruce Tang / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It’s the cherry on top of the March Madness sundae.

When either Gonzaga or North Carolina emerges victorious tonight, "One Shining Moment" will play to close March Madness.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The tweet came at 12:33 p.m. last Saturday.

Downtown Flint.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Stateside is teaming up with MI Curious, folks!

MI Curious is Michigan Radio’s project that asks for your questions about our state and its people.

Richard Wershe Jr. ("White Boy Rick") received a life sentence because he was caught as a 16-year-old with eight kilos of cocaine in Detroit in the 1980s. The documentary about him entitled "White Boy" is premiering at the Freep Film Festival.
Screen grab from Transition Studios

Richard Wershe Jr., otherwise known as "White Boy Rick", has been in prison for nearly 30 years. He's serving a life sentence because he was caught as a 16-year-old with eight kilos of cocaine in Detroit in the 1980s.

A new documentary exploring how the FBI got him involved in the drug game and the people who are working to keep him in prison, made its world premiere in Detroit as part of the Freep Film Festival Friday night.

The title of the film is "White Boy” and its director, Shawn Rech, joined Stateside to talk about how this project came to be.

Pages