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Stateside Staff

Stateside 7.27.2017

Jul 27, 2017

Today, we hear Detroit cast members explain why they hope the new film will spark conversations about race relations. And, nuns recall their role in the 1967 rebellion. They also talk about the injustices still troubling the city today.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Automakers released second-quarter earnings for 2017 this week, and Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes says, on the whole, American companies are doing good business.

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has the most reason to smile, according to Howes. He says FCA profit margins are rising both globally and in North America. And he says demand for cars is continuing to decline in favor of larger SUVs and trucks.

班森 / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

The Next Idea

Baseball and opera usually don’t end up in the same sentence. But for the next year, they will in Detroit.

Next May, the Michigan Opera Theatre will be producing Daniel Sonenberg’s The Summer King, an opera about Negro League’s baseball player Josh Gibson.

The CEO of the Michigan Opera Theatre Wayne Brown joined Stateside to tell us about a partnership between the Michigan Opera Theatre and the Detroit Tigers, called Take Me Out to the Opera.

online commerce giants like Amazon are taking some of the blame for a retail slump at brick-and-mortar stores.
Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Amazon is in the process of building two distribution centers in Michigan. The online retail magnate has received millions in state money as an incentive to build, and hire, in the Great Lakes state. Yet, researchers at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance suggest Amazon’s impact on the overall economy destroys more jobs than it ever creates.

Despite the fact that Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos briefly surpassed Bill Gates as the richest person in the world, Amazon has successfully landed over a billion dollars in subsidies from local governments, according to Stacy Mitchell, co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR).

Stateside 7.26.2017

Jul 26, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how out-of-touch city leaders energized black pastors to redouble their activism efforts after the 1967 rebellion. And, we learn why cities struggling with unpaid water bills could learn from Philadelphia's new approach.

Courtesy of the Archives of Michigan

It’s recognized as the Snow Capital of the Midwest. That’s quite a distinction for a town that no longer exists.

Rachel Clark from the Michigan History Center joined Stateside to explain how the mining town of Delaware, Michigan became a ghost town.

Water running from tap
jordanmrcai / Creative Commons

Detroit is in the midst of turning off the water at homes with unpaid utility bills. Meanwhile, Philadelphia – another major city struggling with water affordability – recently launched a program allowing low-income residents to pay for water based on income, not usage. Philadelphia is the first city in the nation to enact such a program.

According to Peter Hammer, Wayne State University law professor and Director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights, Detroit activists came up with a similar water-affordability plan in 2003 that never gained political traction.

Ali Elisabeth / Michigan Radio

 


Last year, more than 27,000 Detroit homes had water shut off because of what the city says were unpaid bills. In some neighborhoods, one in five homes lost water access.

In 2014, the cash-strapped city started getting tough on people who couldn’t keep up with paying for water. City officials predicted the shutoffs would taper off as residents got on payment plans and bills started being paid, but Bridge Magazine reports residential shutoffs last year rose 18% over the previous year.

Matthias Gutjahr / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


Michigan has been in fierce competition with other Midwest states to lure in Taiwanese electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn. The company had announced intentions to build a massive plant in the United States but didn’t immediately specify where, launching a tax incentive bidding war among the contending states.

Dustin Walsh, a senior reporter at Crain’s Detroit Business, told Stateside President Donald Trump is expected to announce today that new plant will go to Wisconsin. But Michigan may yet get a "runner-up prize,” with Foxconn planning to announce more investments in other states.

Detroit in July of 1967
Walter P. Reuther Library / Wayne State University

The violence in Detroit in the summer of 1967 destroyed large swaths of the city, mostly in black neighborhoods. It also energized the political ambitions of the city's African-American citizens.

The Shrine of the Black Madonna, which opened a few months before the riots broke out, wanted to turn the black church into a political force in Detroit. Its founder Albert Cleage combined the church's history in civil rights activism with an emerging black nationalist movement.

As the nephew of the Shrine's first leader, Wayne County Executive Warren Evans has a unique take on how the summer of 1967 changed the course of religious and political life for black people in Detroit. He also had a front-row seat to the chaos that broke out less than two blocks from his home.

Stateside 7.25.2017

Jul 26, 2017

Today, we speak with a Great Lakes lawmaker who's tired of waiting for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' overdue study on Asian carp. And, we learn about "After/Life," a play that brings forth women's voices from Detroit's 1967 rebellion.

Looking down on a hand holding an open bottle of prescription drugs.
Sharyn Morrow / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan is in the grips of a drug abuse problem. At the same time, many Michigan companies are struggling to find workers for open positions.

What happens when these two problems collide?

A silver carp laying on top of a cooler.
COURTESY OF ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has completed a report looking into measures to keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes.

That, we know. What we don’t know is what’s in the report, as it’s five months overdue.

MyEyeSees / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

Time to check in on professional theater productions around the state with another round of Theater Talk.

David Kiley from Encore Michigan joined Stateside to highlight the world premiere of a one-act play at Tipping Point Theatre in Northville called Young Americans, a play at the Great Escape theater in Marshall called The Miracle Worker, and a one-man show at Mason Street Warehouse in Saugatuck called Fully Committed.

Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

One powerful way to bear witness to history is through theater.

AFTER/LIFE is a living history play based on oral histories of women and girls who lived through the Detroit ’67 rebellion.

The play was conceived by Dr. Lisa Biggs, an assistant professor in Theater and Performance Studies at Michigan State University. It features oral histories from women left out of news accounts, and teaches students about one of Detroit's pivotal moments.

Biggs, along with actor and poet Deborah Chenault Green, joined Stateside to talk about the performance, and Green’s personal account living through the ’67 rebellion.

Stateside 7.24.2017

Jul 24, 2017

Today on Stateside, Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team explains where things stand in the race for governor in Michigan. And, two brothers relive Detroit's 1967 rebellion, which they say helped create a "permanent underclass."

Walter and Wallace Crawford experienced Detroit's 1967 rebellion first hand.
Stateside Staff

In July 1967, Walter and Wallace Crawford had just graduated from St. Vincent High School in Detroit.

The twin brothers were dedicated athletes, heading to college on track scholarships in the fall. On the morning of July 23, the Crawfords woke up and headed to their weekend job at a car wash.

Delaney Ryan

The Next Idea

Helping underserved young people embrace education, get into college and go on to be world-class citizens is the mission of a program called FATE. It's operated as part of the cause-based clothing company Merit Goodness.

Give Merit  Executive Director Kuhu Saha and 2016 FATE graduate Asha Stewart joined Stateside to share how FATE provides a space where students can create aspirations.

A child at a desk raising his hand.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio


We entrust our kids with Michigan's teachers five days a week. Yet most us of probably don't know much  about the way our teachers are paid. The truth might be surprising.

This week, Michigan Radio's Jennifer Guerra is exploring teacher pay in Michigan, and what it means for keeping the best teachers in their classrooms instead of seeing them flee for more lucrative and less stressful jobs elsewhere.

Stateside 7.21.2017

Jul 21, 2017

 

Today on Stateside, a Republican announces his campaign for governor. Plus, we talk with the author of a book that covers 300 years of black history in Detroit, including more than one civil disturbance. 

State Senator Patrick Colbeck sitting at a table
Kate Wells/Michigan Radio

Republican State Sen. Patrick Colbeck, R-Canton, will officially launch his campaign to be Michigan’s next governor tomorrow, at the Willow Run Airport near Ypsilanti.

Colbeck made a career as an aerospace engineer and small business owner before entering politics. He has disagreed with current Governor Rick Snyder in the past, calling Snyder's decision to veto legislation that would have created a "Choose Life" Michigan license plate "disgraceful." Colbeck promises to bring “principled solutions” to Lansing, and says tax increases should always be a last resort.

Bill Goodman: "People during the uprising in 1967 were arrested en masse, huge numbers of people, hundreds and hundreds, maybe thousands of people were arrested."
Reuther Library

The mistreatment of African-Americans and Detroit's mostly white police force fueled the violence of July 1967. But black Detroiters didn't fare much better in the courts.

Bill Goodman was a young lawyer in the city during the uprising, when thousands of people were being arrested and held in cramped, unsanitary conditions.

Herb Boyd, author of "Black Detroit: A People's History of Self-Determination." Boyd came to Detroit with his mother in the 1940s. He now teachers at The City College of New York and lives in Harlem, NY
Lester Graham

There are many histories of Detroit. The latest is a comprehensive look at the contributions, accomplishments and long-suffering of the African Americans who have called Detroit home.

The book is Black Detroit: A People’s History of Self-Determination by Herb Boyd, son of Detroit and an instructor at The City College of New York currently teaching African American history. Boyd now lives in Harlem.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 


This week, the state of Michigan dropped charges and arrest warrants against 186 people — almost all of them Detroit residents — after accusing them of illegally collecting unemployment benefits. This group is among about 28,000 people the state wrongly accused of unemployment benefit fraud due to serious flaws in its automated fraud detection system.

Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and a former Republican legislative leader, and Vicki Barnett, a former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator, joined Stateside to discuss this week's political news.

Stateside 7.20.2017

Jul 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, how the Detroit Free Press owners unveiled a new online look for the paper and outraged its customers. Then, what history teaches us about the tension between Detroit's white police force and its African American citizens.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

A National Guardsman patrols a Detroit street during the July 1967 rebellion.
Tony Spina / Walter P. Reuther Library/Wayne State University

To understand why African-American Detroiters hit a breaking point with the city's police force in July 1967, we must turn to the history of the Detroit Police Department, and how white officers treated black men, women and children.

David Parry/PA / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

The seventh season of HBO’s Game of Thrones premiered this week. The show is a ground-breaker in many ways, including becoming TV’s first global blockbuster.

University of Michigan professor of media studies Amanda Lotz joined Stateside to explain why and how Game of Thrones gained such success without the use of the internet like many TV show success stories these days.

David Tarver

The Next Idea

It’s the quintessential American success story. Three young, black engineers left a major technology corporation to form their own business. They built it into an internationally successful company and eventually sold it. 

Today’s guest on The Next Idea, David Tarver, was one of the engineers who founded Telecom Analysis Systems over 30 years ago amid the challenges and promise of the post-Civil Rights era. 

Many readers were outraged by the new look of the Detroit Free Press website.
Screenshot Freep.com

Online readers of the Detroit Free Press logged on last week and were greeted with a surprise: No more traditional Olde English typeface known as "Blackletter".

Instead, readers found a custom typeface: Unify Sans and Unify Serif, to be specific. And a blue circle, which is the look of USA Today.

And that's exactly what the owners of the Free Press want, because the venerable Detroit paper is owned by Gannett/USA Today Network. Immediately, howls of dismay and outrage went up on social media.

Jeannette / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0


In the second installment of our series showcasing the Detroit music scene we welcome back to Stateside Paul Young, founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine and Khalid Bhatti, executive editor of Detroit Music Magazine, to introduce three more talented artists.

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