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Stateside Staff

H. Michael Karshis / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

For the Michigan Wolverines basketball team, it’s on to the championship game. One last game stands between the Wolverines and their first NCAA title since 1989.

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio’s sports commentator, joined Stateside to discuss the Wolverines’ victory over Loyola University Chicago, the challenges ahead against Villanova, and also about Notre Dame’s historic victory in the NCAA women’s championship over the weekend.

Old White Truck / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The Trump administration continues rolling back regulations set under the Obama administration. This time, it’s looking like it could be fuel-efficiency and pollution standards for the auto industry. These guidelines were one of President Obama's signature moves to fight climate change.

Is the Trump administration rolling back standards to a greater degree than auto companies expected? Michelle Krebs, a Detroit-based executive analyst for Autotrader, joined Stateside to discuss what this weakening of the federal targets could mean to the Michigan economy.

Photo on left by Kaity Fuja, others courtesy Kyla Carneiro

 


 

Kyla Carneiro, the Digital Communication Specialist for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi, joined Stateside to tell us about the tribe's podcast, Yajmownen, which she hosts and produces.

Stateside 3.30.2018

Mar 30, 2018

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell says we need to get out of the way and let young people be our voice on gun safety. And, a study predicts climate change will bring more deadly heat waves to the Great Lakes by the mid-2030s. 

Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

A Flint water researcher might have thrown a monkey wrench into prosecutors' case against Nick Lyon, director of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. Lyon is being prosecuted by the state on charges of involuntary manslaughter and misconduct. Another agency official is charged with obstruction of justice.

The wrench: a complaint lodged by Virginia Tech professor Marc Edwards, the researcher who first came forward with evidence that Flint had elevated levels of lead in its drinking water. 

Hastings Lake, MI
Christine Riggle / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The League of Conservation Voters recently issued a blog post about what the group calls “Five bad ideas for Michigan.” Those ideas touch on a range of bills that would affect environmental rulemaking and permitting, water withdrawal by private companies and farms, state ballast water regulations that protect from invasive species, control of Michigan’s Natural Resources Trust Fund, and the state’s ability to have stronger regulations than federal standards.

satellite map of Michigan, the Great Lakes
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

A new analysis of heat wave patterns published in Nature Climate Change found changes could come to the Great Lakes region as soon as 15 years from now. It found human-caused greenhouse gases will have more influence on heat waves than natural variability.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Two members of Congress, Republican Fred Upton and Democrat Debbie Dingell, are co-chairing a working group that’s tackling the issues related to school shootings and guns.

Dingell joined Stateside today to discuss that working group, and what she’s doing to avoid the “same old discussion” on guns.

Allan Cleaver / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The clock is ticking. CPAs and tax attorneys are working long hours right now as taxes are due in less than a month.

But what should we be doing now so that filing for 2018 goes smoothly, in light of the huge tax reform bill that was recently passed?

Stateside 3.29.2018

Mar 29, 2018

Today on Stateside, we discuss the latest on mediation between Michigan State and Larry Nassar's victims. And, a tax expert says to pay attention now, because there'll be big changes next time you file.

Michigan players running the basketball down the court with a ref in the background
MGoBlog / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


 

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio sports commentator, joined Stateside to give us an update on everything going on with Michigan sports (and there is a lot).

A black and white photo of Rabindranath Tagore
Wikimedia Commons - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

As controversy swirled around Bob Dylan's 2017 Nobel prize for literature, some argued that Dylan wasn't even the first songwriter to win the prize. That honor may belong to Indian songwriter, poet and philosopher Rabindranath Tagore.  

MSU Archives and Historical Collections

The Larry Nassar scandal is not the first time Michigan State University has been embroiled in a national controversy.

More than 50 years ago, the school became linked with America's war in Vietnam.

Seattle-based writer Eric Scigliano is well -acquainted with that scandal. His father, Robert Scigliano, was a MSU political science professor who took part in a Michigan State operation in Vietnam.

Michigan State University sign
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

This week, Michigan State University's interim president John Engler announced the school was returning to mediation with victims of Larry Nassar, saying "The university remains committed to reaching a fair settlement with all the survivors."

But at the same time, MSU lawyers were trying again to dismiss the numerous federal lawsuits the university facing.

An electric car charger with a car in the background
Kārlis Dambrāns / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


 

Daniel Howes, Detroit News business columnist, joined Stateside today to talk about what he's calling the "Great Auto Disconnect."

Stateside 3.28.2018

Mar 28, 2018

Today on Stateside, a reporter describes why he thinks Karen Spranger's time in office will go down in history as the "most bizarre" era for Macomb County politics. And, we learn about a Michigan woodworking company "reclaiming trees and lives" with an ex-felon mentorship program.

Elderly woman
Borya / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

How do you know if nursing homes, home health aides, and assisted living communities are treating you or your loved ones properly, and what do you do if they're not?

We'll have that conversation on Stateside soon, but first we need your questions.

Andrew Kreszewski (left) and Rob Richmond (right) in front of a brick wall
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

 

There are any number of custom design and fabrication companies, but Urban Ashes is different: It's the only one with the motto "reclaiming trees and lives."  

The Saline company makes a wide array of items for businesses and homes out of wood carefully salvaged from abandoned homes and businesses in the Detroit area.

 

That once-forgotten wood is then crafted by a once-forgotten workforce: ex-offenders and young people who are close to falling into that path that leads to jail or prison. 

Casa de Rosado / Facebook

Turning shame into pride.

That’s the idea behind an exhibit of black velvet paintings. It’s called “Black Velvet: A Rasquache Aesthetic,” and it’s happening at the Latino Cultural Center in Detroit's Mexicantown.

Teemu008 / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Ever since the arrival of Europeans to Michigan, farming has been a key economic component for our state. However, without the life’s work of a Michigander from South Haven, farms in Michigan and across the nation might evolved quite differently.

Mark Harvey, State Archivist at the Michigan History Center, joined Stateside to discuss the life of pioneering botanist and horticulturist Liberty Hyde Bailey, how his “agrarian ideology” of advanced technology was received at the time, and how he’s remembered today.

Macomb County Clerk Karen Spranger
Macomb Daily

Macomb County Clerk Karen Spranger took office in January 2017, and there's been non-stop drama surrounding her ever since.

That drama hit a new high Tuesday when a judge ordered Spranger to be removed from her post.

Taking her place will be Kathy Brower, a long-time Macomb County employee. A judge appointed her temporary acting county clerk today.

Stateside 3.27.2018

Mar 27, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn what you need to know about the arrest of Larry Nassar's former boss, and what it means for Michigan State University. Also today, we discuss an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan and take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists.

Logan Martin / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

As America gets older, the question of who's going to care for Grandma and Grandpa becomes more complicated and more urgent. Consider this: the number of Americans over age 65 will more than double in less than 50 years.

Patricia Smith, a professor of economics at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, recently penned a piece for The Conversation that explores the future of “the daunting economics of elder care.”

Michigander

Each month, we take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists.

This time, the theme is spring, a great time to look at new music from Michigander, Baron Crook’s Tangle Parade, and Max Landry.

Harvard Square Editions, 2018

When Michigan’s economy tanked a decade ago, it stepped up a steady stream of young people leaving Michigan to seek work in Chicago.

Michael Ferro was one of those young Michiganders. His experience working for the federal government in the Windy City was the inspiration for his debut novel Title 13.

Mugshot of Dr. William Strampel
Michigan Attorney General's office

The fallout from the Larry Nassar scandal at Michigan State University continues. Nassar’s boss and former Dean of MSU's College of Osteopathic Medicine, William Strampel, was arrested late Monday and arraigned Tuesday on felony and misdemeanor charges.

Wikimedia Commons / Van Vechten Collection at Library of Congress

 

 

This time, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brings us an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan.

 

Listen above to hear Kiley’s previews of the following shows:

Stateside 3.26.2018

Mar 26, 2018

Today on Stateside, the Department of Environmental Quality responds to charges of slow action and a cozy relationship with polluter Wolverine Worldwide. And, the reporter who broke the Nassar scandal explains how the story came together.

Department of Environmental Quality / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

A state website reports there are 28 sites in 15 communities with known PFAS contaminated levels in the water. 

PFAS is an acronym for a group of widely used industrial chemicals known as per-and-polyfluoroalkyl substances. The department has been accused of being too slow in clean up and too cozy with polluters.

Courtesy of Natasha T. Miller

 


 

Tomorrow, March 27, beginning at 7 p.m., the Detroit Institute of Arts will host a 14-hour, overnight event called "The Science of Grief.

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