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Stateside Staff

 


Donald Trump’s victory is seen as one of the watershed moments in American political history.

Michigan voters certainly played a role in this upset.

It’s Just Politics team Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta sat down with us today to dive into what happened in our state.

The Regional Transit Authority millage was defeated Tuesday.
flickr user Matt Picio / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

If you favored the Regional Transit Authority millage, you saw a big step towards the connected, regional transportation system that’s never existed in Southeast Michigan.

If you opposed it, you saw a tax hike for services you likely don’t need or care about.

The opposition won. Southeast Michigan voters said “no” to the RTA millage.

Megan Owens of Transportation Riders United spoke with us today.

Flickr user jdog90 / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Detroit has itself a new school board chosen from a field of 63 candidates. Bridge Magazine reporter Chastity Pratt Dawsey joined Stateside to talk about the seven winners and what’s ahead for them.

Polling station sign
user jaina / Creative Commons


Many Americans were stunned and blindsided by Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton.

That’s largely because months and months of polls pointed to a defeat of our new president-elect.

Zach Gorchow, editor of Gongwer News Service, joined us today to talk about those polls.

“Polling has a lot of problems. It’s just not able to model the electorate successfully, and that seems to be especially true in Michigan,” Gorchow said. “It just flat out failed to model the African-American turnout correctly, it failed to model the rural turnout correctly."

 

Today, we learn why our election process is so dang long. And, in our latest edition of Songs from Studio East, we meet a band that blends ska, punk and Latin rhythms. 

It's Election Day, but that doesn't mean the fun stops here. Grossmann told us many politicians are looking four years ahead, and, "in some ways, [the 2020 presidential campaign] has already started."
Ryan Grimes / Michigan Radio

 

Election Day marks the finish line of a grueling, fractious and long campaign.

It started with Ted Cruz announcing his candidacy in March 2015.

Twenty months later, many Americans are expressing their exhaustion with the process.

Many people are looking wistfully to other countries like Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and France, which elect their leaders in a few weeks and then move on.

Michigan State University associate professor of political science Matt Grossmann sat down with us today to talk about how the process for electing our president became so protracted.

Courtesy of Deborah Trimble

Kevin Trimble’s life changed forever on September 18, 2011. A private in the army, his unit was sweeping a village in Afghanistan for IEDs when, as he puts it, they found one the hard way. Specialist Ryan James Cook, the soldier who stepped on the IED, died immediately. Kevin was standing eleven feet away and lost both legs and his left arm.

Minutes later, on the other side of the ocean, his sister, Deborah Trimble, answered her phone. A military police officer with the Air Force, she was her brother’s emergency contact, and she tried to understand what the sergeant at the other end of the line was telling her. Her brother was still on his way to the hospital, and the extent of his injuries was not yet clear.

Former Michigan State basketball player Anthony Ianni is the first known person with Autism Spectrum Disorder to play division one college basketball.
Raymond Holt

Doctors told Anthony Ianni's parents he’d have a tough time graduating high school. As for college? Forget it. The doctors predicted he would wind up living in a group home. But Ianni had other ideas. 

Lauren Luci / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Americans love their bottled water.

Statistics from the Beverage Marketing Corporation tell us that while sales of soft drinks, fruit drinks, sports drinks – even milk – have dropped over the past 15 years, sales of bottled water are booming.

In 2015, Americans guzzled nearly 12 billion gallons of bottle water. That’s a big jump from the 4.5 billion gallons we drank in 2000.

All that demand means Swiss corporation Nestle wants to pump more water out of the ground in West Michigan. It wants to increase pumping from 250 to 400 gallons a minute at one of its wells near Evart in Osceola County.

And the public nearly missed its chance to comment on the proposal.

Today, we discuss why the most important campaigners are in Michigan on the day before the presidential election. And, we hear why it's difficult for one economist to be optimistic about our economic future, no matter who wins.

wikimedia user McZusatz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

All through the presidential campaign, the issue of free trade has been bubbling away on the national front burner.

Much of the focus and campaign rhetoric has been on the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The proposed trade deal among the United States, Canada and ten nations in the Asia-Pacific region could cover 40% of America’s imports and exports.

We’re in the first year of a two-year ratification period.

Donald Trump has bashed the TPP at every turn. Hillary Clinton once praised the TPP as the “gold standard” of trade deals, but has backed off of that support, nudged that way by the staunch opposition of one-time opponent Bernie Sanders.

Economist Marina von Neumann Whitman joined us today to take a deeper look at the future of free trade policy in 2017.

Stateside Staff / Michigan Radio

Being a musician can be tough. It can be brutal.

Apart from trying to create—and then build an audience for what you're creating—there's the side of the music scene that can be ugly: Intense competition. Not getting support or inspiration.

The music business has long been dominated by men—especially on the business and production sides. Which means, all too often, that women have even bigger mountains to climb.

Kohlrabi and rutabaga
flickr user Seacost Eat Local / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Getting bored with serving up the same old veggies?

That’s your cue to think seasonally, just the way folks did in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Right now, you can turn your attention to fall root vegetables – the ones you might never have thought of serving.

Tomm Becker of Sunseed Farm in Ann Arbor sat down with us today to talk about some forgotten fall root vegetables: kohlrabi, rutabaga and celeriac.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

For both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, the long and winding campaign road ends in Michigan.

Hillary Clinton will be at Grand Valley State in West Michigan this afternoon and Donald Trump, with Governor Mike Pence, will wrap up his campaign with a rally at 11 p.m. tonight in downtown Grand Rapids.

Earlier today, President Obama held a rally for Hillary Clinton in Ann Arbor, Governor Mike Pence campaigned in Traverse City, and Ivanka and Tiffany Trump campaigned in Hudsonville.

On Sunday, former President Bill Clinton visited churches in Flint, while Donald Trump held a rally for some 8,000 people in Sterling Heights.

Chad Livengood, political reporter for The Detroit News, joined Stateside to help explain what all this attention means.

 

Today, we learn what to expect at the polls on Election Day. And, we head to Elderly Instruments for the next rendition of our series Artisans of Michigan

Flickr user - Patty Follow / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Ancient Egyptian history and culture is considered one of the oldest traces of Western civilization, and those who ruled in Egypt were known as pharaohs. 

King Tutankhamun, or King Tut, is one of the most widely known pharaohs. His tomb was discovered 94 years ago today, in 1922, by archeologist Howard Carter. Inside it was the mummified body of King Tut.

Howard Markel, a University of Michigan professor and medical historian, discussed King Tut's tomb and its supposed curse with Stateside

According to Moran, the statistics prove that African Americans are more likely to be wrongfully convicted than white people.
flickr user Thomas Hawk / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan Radio is involved with several news media partners in a project called the Detroit Journalism Cooperative. One of the issues we're looking at this year is justice, things such as mass incarceration and wrongful conviction. 

There's a nationwide network of legal clinics that are working to litigate claims of actual innocence by prisoners. Many of these clinics base their work on DNA evidence which has led to clearing the names and the release of hundreds of people. 

At the University of Michigan, the Michigan Innocence Clinic operates a little differently. It pursues cases in which DNA evidence is not available. 

Suzanna Shkreli, the Democratic Party's candidate for Michigan's 8th Congressional District.
Suzanna Shkreli / Facebook

The race in the 8th Congressional District has been interesting this year.

First, Melissa Gilbert, the former child star of TV’s Little House on the Prairie, became the Democratic challenger to incumbent Republican Mike Bishop. Then, Gilbert dropped out and the Democrats had to pick a new candidate. They chose a Macomb County assistant prosecutor, Suzanna Shkreli.

Shkreli joined Stateside to talk about her campaign and what she hopes to bring to the voters in the 8th District

Ruth (Maki) Powell

 

Ninety years ago yesterday brought the worst mining accident in Michigan history.

The Barnes-Hecker Mine disaster on November 3, 1926, killed 51 miners. The disaster rocked the community west of Ishpeming.

Mary Tippett’s grandfather was killed in the disaster. It was his first day on the job.

Today, guests consider a question many may have for both presidential candidates: Where exactly will the jobs come from? And, we hear from a filmmaker hoping to provide an antidote to political ranting.

Subjects from the documentary film "Bring It to the Table".
BringItToTheTable.com

In five days, Americans will vote.

The deep distrust and dislike so many people feel for both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump has led to an exceptionally bitter campaign where political dialogue has all too often devolved into shouting profanities at each other.

Julie Winokur is a filmmaker who hopes to provide an antidote to political ranting. Her project and documentary Bring It To The Table is helping people stop bickering about politics. She is in Ann Arbor today to screen her film and to get people talking.

Hubert Roberts during filming.
Courtesy of Geri Alumit Zeldes

 

From a youthful act that landed him in prison, to becoming a man whose life work is mentoring youth in Flint, Hubert Roberts offers a powerful lesson in redemption.

Now that story is being told through the work of a Michigan State University professor and her team.

Their project is called Hubert: His-Story. It’s a documentary film and a comic book that feature the life and work of Hubert Roberts of Flint.

Roberts joined us today, along with Geri Alumit Zeldes, associate professor and director of Journalism Graduate Studies at MSU.

user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

With the clock ticking down on the presidential campaign, Michigan and its 16 electoral votes are in the spotlight.

The candidates and the high-profile people campaigning for them are virtually tripping over each other as they criss-cross the state.

Yesterday Ivanka Trump, Donald Trump Jr., former President Bill Clinton, and Bernie Sanders were in Michigan. Today, Ivanka Trump is in Rochester, and Indiana Governor Mike Pence campaigns in Portage.

And there will be more rallies tomorrow. First Pence in Lansing, and then Hillary Clinton in Detroit’s Eastern Market, and Eric Trump will work his way through Michigan.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes believes all this activity proves the Mitten is in play.

Morgan Springer / Interlochen Public Radio

What’s the most important thing to consider when you’re choosing a neighborhood?

Showing improvement may not be enough for some Detroit schools as the state plans to close failing schools.
Matt Katzenberger / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

The latest list of Michigan's worst-performing schools is due to be released any day now. Under state law, the School Reform Office can close schools that have been mired in the lowest five percent for three straight years. But what of schools that say they've begun to turn things around? Or schools in challenged neighborhoods, whose students started very far behind? What happens to those students if the state shuts down their school?

Erin Einhorn looked at one example of this dilemma in a report for Chalkbeat Detroit. It's a charter school in Detroit called the Michigan Technical Academy and they are asking the state to give them more time.

The 7th Annual Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition will take place at the Cobo Center in Detroit on November 3.
Bernt Rostad / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

This Thursday, three dozen Michigan start-up companies will compete for up to $1 million in prizes. In addition, they will earn critical exposure to venture capital investors, both regional and national.

They will be competing at the 7th Annual Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition. Organizers say that Accelerate Michigan prize winners have created over a thousand jobs and have raised over $500 million in venture capital.

Mark Schlissel
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

When racist fliers were found in two buildings on the University of Michigan campus earlier this fall, university officials were quick to respond.

First, President Mark Schlissel called a “community conversation” at which students, faculty, staff, and other community members could express their thoughts and feelings. The following week, the University launched its five-year Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategic Plan.

The timing of that launch, however, was largely coincidental: the plan had been under development for more than a year. It quickly received criticism from black student activists for failing to do enough to address specific acts of racism on campus.

 

Today, we hear the president of the University of Michigan respond to racist fliers found on campus. And, we learn how one of the state's lowest-performing schools is improving, and asking the state for more time.

Courtesy of Michael Manasseri

The Pickle Recipe is a film completely shot in and around Detroit, but it's packed with universal truths.

Truth about family ties and about family members who make us crazy and warm our hearts—sometimes at the very same moment. And truth about the power of food and memories.

Today, we hear from the Republican candidate in the 1st Congressional District, one of the most competitive districts in the country. And, in the spirit of Halloween, we hear from the owner of Michigan's biggest haunted house.

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