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1:44 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Planned renovation of I-94 is met with resistance, but will it be worth it?

Renovation plans for I-94 include expanding and modernizing.
Flickr

An interview with Rob Morosi and Megan Owens.

Earlier this summer, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, SEMCOG, adopted something called the "2040 Regional Transportation Plan." It's a roadmap, essentially, of how to spend $36 billion over the next 30 years to improve transportation in Southeast Michigan.

Of all the proposed improvements in this plan, the most controversial has been the renovation and expansion of I-94 and I-75. The price tag to expand and renovate these Detroit-area freeways is around $4 billion.

But critics say the proposals, especially the I-94 project, would force neighbors to pay a different price.

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Stateside
5:16 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

The drive-in movie theater celebrates its 80th anniversary

The Ford-Wyoming drive-in movie theater in Detroit.
Jim Rees Flickr

An interview with Philip Hallman with the University of Michigan's Department of Screen Arts and Culture.

Ask any baby-boomer about some of their best memories growing up and chances are good that a drive-in theater figures in there somewhere.

It was a wonderful and uniquely American thing: roll up to the parking spot, perch the little speaker on your window, order lots of food, and watch movies from your car. Kids would go in their PJs and watch movies while lying on the roof. For teenagers in the 50s, 60s and 70s, well, perhaps the movie was a secondary attraction.

This summer marks the 80 year anniversary of the invention of the drive-in movie theater. After a slow start, the trend really took off. Detroit got its first drive-in theater in 1938.

Let's take a trip back in time to the glory days of the drive-in. Joining us is Philip Hallman with the University of Michigan's Department of Screen Arts and Culture.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

New book tells the story of 5 Michigan nurses and medics caught behind Nazi lines in WWII

Cate Lineberry, author of "The Secret Rescue: An Untold Story of American Nurses and Medics Behind Nazi Lines."
Facebook

An interview with author Cate Lineberry.

It's been nearly 70 years since the last bomb fell and the last bullet was fired in World War II, but stories from the war are still being unearthed.

One of these stories is told in the new book "The Secret Rescue: An Untold Story of American Nurses and Medics Behind Nazi Lines" by Cate Lineberry.

A plane carrying nurses and medics crash lands in Albania behind Nazi lines, and you would not believe what it took to get these Americans to safety.

It's the kind of story that would make a powerful movie. It has been largely hidden and unknown all these years, and figuring in this story are five nurses and medics from Michigan.

Author Cate Lineberry joined us today from New Orleans.

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Politics & Culture
5:07 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, July 10, 2013

During World War II, a plane crashed behind Nazi lines. Thirty nurses and medics, five of them from Michigan, survived. Their incredible story is finally being told.

And, we celebrated the 80th anniversary of the drive-in movie theater. Did you know Michigan once had more than 100 drive-ins? Today just a hand full are in operation. Also, Kevyn Orr canceled the bus tour he was supposed to take the Detroit's creditors on today. We spoke with Nancy Kaffer about why this happened. First on the show, this has certainly been a wet and muggy summer. Michigan farmers endured a hot and dry summer in 2012, so we wondered what the soggy summer of 2013 is doing to crops and to farmers. Is it better than the scorcher of 2012? 

Ken DeCock is a third-generation farmer in Macomb Township where his family owns Boyka's Farm Market. He joined us today to give us the farmer's-eye view of our weather.

Stateside
5:03 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Detroit's creditors will not be going on a bus tour of the city

No DDOT bus tour for creditors.

An interview with Nancy Kaffer, Columnist at the Detroit Free Press.

Detroit’s emergency manager has canceled a planned bus tour for city bondholders today.

The bus tour was meant to hammer home that Detroit is in dire shape and simply cannot afford to pay off all its debts.

The Wall Street creditors are in town to talk with Kevyn Orr. They’re trying to work out a deal outside bankruptcy court.

Nancy Kaffer, Columnist at the Detroit Free Press joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:01 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

How Michigan farmers are dealing with the wet summer weather this year

Jane Doughnut Creative Commons

An interview with farmer Ken DeCock.

This has certainly been a wet and muggy summer.

Michigan farmers endured a hot and dry summer in 2012, so we wondered what the soggy summer of 2013 is doing to crops and to farmers. Is it better than the scorcher of 2012?

Ken DeCock is a third-generation farmer in Macomb Township where his family owns Boyka's Farm Market. He joined us today to give us the farmer's-eye view of our weather.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:58 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Outrage after Highland Park high school's library material gets dumped in the trash

Hundreds of books were retrieved from the high school dumpster, but thousands more were lost.
Courtesy Paul Lee

An interview with historian Paul Lee.

There has been a firestorm of protest in Highland Park after the discovery that a large collection of history books, film and tapes from the city's high school was tossed in the trash.

Some 50 protestors gathered outside the high school in Highland Park, a member of the school board quit, and several people climbed into dumpsters to retrieve what they could.

The protests focused not only on the discarded books but on the way Highland Park's emergency manager Donald Weatherspoon is running the district.

One of those people who searched through the dumpsters to retrieve as many books as possible is Paul Lee. He is a Highland Park resident and an historian who helped build the collection of black history books, videos and movies.

Here is a video he shot while looking through the dumpster:

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Stateside
5:51 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

South Manitou Island prepares for special lighthouse tours

Sleeping Bear Dunes was voted "The Most Beautiful Place in America" on ABC's Good Morning America.
Danielle Lynch Flickr

An interview with Pat Kelly, granddaughter of the longest-serving lighthouse keeper on South Manitou Island.

To many in Michigan and the tourists who visit, the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore is one of the most beautiful parts of "Pure Michigan." In fact, ABC’s Good Morning America called the Sleeping Bear Dunes the most beautiful place in America.

Part of that National Lakeshore is South Manitou Island. And some people with very special ties to South Manitou Island have been very busy getting the place spruced up and polished for a special day tomorrow.

Pat Kelly is the granddaughter of James Putnam-Burdick, who was the longest-serving lighthouse keeper on South Manitou Island, and she joined us today from South Manitou's ranger station.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:49 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Little Traverse Conservancy is working to protect Michigan land and resources

Tom Bailey is the Executive Director of the Little Traverse Conservancy.
landtrust.org

An interview with Tom Bailey, the Executive Director of the Little Traverse Conservancy.

One of the things we most like to do here on Stateside is to highlight success stories in Michigan, to share with everyone what's working well and why.

One of those Michigan success stories is the Little Traverse Conservancy. If you've enjoyed the beauty of northern Michigan, it's a good bet the Little Traverse Conservancy had something to do with it.

We often hear talk about rebuilding Michigan, but what about preserving it?

Tom Bailey is the Executive Director of the Little Traverse Conservancy, and he joined us today from Petoskey.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:46 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Garages should not be used as living spaces, according to Dearborn city officials

Dearborn city officials say they don't want garages to become "habitable" places for cooking/sleeping because garages aren't built to the same standards as the rest of a home
Flickr

An interview with Jeff Karoub of the Associated Press.

Should homeowners be allowed to do pretty much whatever they want with their garages, as long as it doesn't bother neighbors?

That's the essence of a growing debate in Dearborn, where a desire by some residents, largely Arab-Americans, to use their garages as living space is being met with resistance at City Hall and the prospect of tighter garage ordinances.

Jeff Karoub is with the Associated Press, covering issues pertinent to the Arab-Muslim community, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:43 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Should garages be able to be turned into living spaces? It's happening in Dearborn and a possible clampdown in city ordinances is causing concern.

Plus, how much land should we preserve for our kids and grandkids? We took a look at one group that's successfully saving northern Michigan's natural treasures.

And, we spoke with a former Marine sniper-scout who's now a student at Michigan State University. He’s made a film to honor his fallen comrades.

Also, Pat Kelly, the granddaughter of the longest-serving lighthouse keeper on South Manitou Island, joined us to talk about the special lighthouse tour happening tomorrow.

First on the show, there has been a firestorm of protest in Highland Park after the discovery that a collection of history books, film and tapes from the city's high school was tossed in the trash.

Some 50 protestors gathered outside the high school in Highland Park, a member of the school board quit, and several people climbed into dumpsters to retrieve what they could.

The protests focused not only on the discarded books but on the way Highland Park School District's emergency manager Donald Weatherspoon is running things.

We started by turning to one of those people who searched through the dumpsters to retrieve as many books as possible. He is a Highland Park resident and an historian who helped build the collection of black history books, videos and movies.

Paul Lee joined us today from Highland Park.

Stateside
4:06 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

MSU student produces documentary dedicated to casualties of Operation Enduring Freedom

Logan Stark is the producer of the documentary "For the 25."
Twitter

An interview with former Marine sniper Logan Stark.

In October 2010, the 3rd Battalion 5th Marines deployed to Afghanistan. They were sent to relieve the British Royal Marines in the southern Helmand Province, a hotbed of insurgent fighters and IEDs.

Twenty-five Marines in the 3rd Battalion 5th Marines did not come home.

One of those who did come home went on to become a student at Michigan State University. Former Marine sniper Logan Stark is now a senior in MSU's Professional Writing Program.

As a class project, Logan formed a three-member team that produced a documentary called "For the 25" dedicated to his fallen brothers in the "Dark Horse" battalion, which suffered the highest number of casualties in 2010 during Operation Enduring Freedom.

Logan Stark joined us in the studio today.

You can watch "For the 25" below.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:53 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Michigan Supreme Court refuses to rule early on right-to-work

Michigan Supreme Court
photo courtesy of the MI Supreme Court

An interview with Chris Gautz, the Capitol Correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business.

On Friday, the Michigan Supreme Court said it would not make an early ruling on the constitutionality of the state's new right-to-work law. Governor Snyder had asked the high court to decide the issue before the case made its way through lower courts.

The law was passed last December during a very controversial lame-duck legislative session. Under the law, workers cannot be forced to pay union dues or fees as a condition of employment.

Chris Gautz, the Capitol Correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business joined us today to help break it down for us.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:52 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Michigan kid wins lunch at the White House with his pizza pocket recipe

Jacob Hirsch's "picky eater pita pizza pocket" recipe was one of the 54 winners in the Kids' State Dinner 2013 competition.
http://www.letsmove.gov/

An interview with Jacob Hirsch, a winner of the Kids' State Dinner 2013 competition.

If you have ever visited the White House, you know it's an exciting memory you always treasure.

But how many of us can say we not only visited the White House, we were invited to have lunch with the First Lady of the United States?

Jacob Hirsch of Bloomfield Hills is 8 years old. Tomorrow, Jacob will be a guest at a Kid's "State Dinner" hosted by none other than First Lady Michelle Obama. It's actually a healthy lunch, part of the First Lady's "Let's Move" initiative.

Jacob won his invitation by submitting a healthy recipe in a big national competition. And out of more than 13 hundred entries, Jacob's "Picky Eater Pita Pizza Pocket" was one of 54 winners.

Jacob Hirsch joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:51 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Detroit is seeing a rise in 'pop-up' businesses

Coffee and ______ is Angela Foster's latest pop-up business.
Facebook

An interview with Brian Ellison and Angela Foster about pop-up businesses.

It used to be, when you would think of a "pop-up business," you would pretty much think of those Halloween stores that pop-up each September, or the fireworks tents each July, or the Christmas tree and wreath lots that appear each Thanksgiving.

But the pop-up is growing and temporary businesses or exhibitions are gaining traction in cities and towns where the Great Recession left many empty storefronts.

And the pop-up works on so many levels, both for the entrepreneur and the business districts and cities who can see new life being breathed into buildings and areas that have been way too quiet.

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Stateside
5:47 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Dump a ton of trash in Ottawa, pay $100 - Dump a ton of trash in Michigan, pay 21 cents

It is cheaper for Canadian trash haulers to bring their garbage to Michigan than it is to dump it on their side of the border.
Flickr

An interview with Barry Rabe, who teaches public and environmental policy at the University of Michigan.

Michigan is known for its lakes, sparkling rivers, forests, and campgrounds. And for being a great, cheap place to dump your trash, at least if you’re a Canadian waste hauler.

Consider this: It costs $64 to dump a ton of trash in a landfill in Windsor, over $100 in Ottawa, and on the U.S. side of the border, you’d pay $12.99 a ton in Wisconsin.

Here in Michigan? It costs 21 cents per ton.

And that Canadian trucker hauling the trash pays just five dollars to cross at the border.

It’s a small wonder that Michigan has become a mighty attractive destination for Canadian businesses looking to get rid of their trash.

Just why is our state so ‘cheap and easy’ when it comes to Canadian trash?

Barry Rabe teaches public and environmental policy at the University of Michigan at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, and he joined us today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:41 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Detroit's three casinos are showing a decline in revenue

Mike Russell. Wikimedia Commons

An interview with Jake Miklojcik, the President of Michigan Consultants.

As revenue shrank and budget holes grew, the City of Detroit has turned to its three casinos for badly needed tax revenue, as well as jobs.

And at a time when an emergency manager is running the show, and bankruptcy is looming, it is not great news to hear that all three Detroit casinos posted a decline in revenue from May 2012 to May 2013.

Jake Miklojcik is the President of Michigan Consultants. He's an economic analyst, and he joined us today to talk about what’s causing the revenue drop and what can be done about it.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:36 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Stateside for Monday, July 8th, 2013

Canada is dumping its garbage in Michigan. We took a look at why it's so cheap to haul trash over the border and the political reasons making it hard to stop.

And, the rise of the pop-up: Why temporary businesses are springing up and finding success.

And, we spoke with Jacob Hirsch, the boy from Bloomfield Hills who won a trip to the White House to have lunch with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Also, Jake Miklojcik joined us to talk about why Detroit casinos are seeing a drop in revenue.

But first we talked about Friday's decision by the Michigan Supreme Court. The court said it would not make an early ruling on the constitutionality of the state's new right-to-work law. Governor Snyder had asked the high court to decide the issue before the case made its way through lower courts.

The law was passed last December during a very controversial lame-duck legislative session. Under the law, workers cannot be forced to pay union dues or fees as a condition of employment.

Chris Gautz, the capitol correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today to help break it down.

Stateside
4:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The history of 4th of July celebrations

The Parade Company via theparade.org

An interview with author Bill Loomis.

With the 4th of July at hand, it's a good bet many of us have a backyard barbeque in our plans, maybe catching a fireworks show or doing one of your own in your backyard.

That got us thinking about the ways Michiganders have marked the big National Holiday over the centuries, and for that, we turn to our Official Stateside Historian.

Bill Loomis writes for the Detroit News and he's the author of "Detroit's Delectable Past: Two Centuries of Frog Legs, Pigeon Pie and Drugstore Whiskey." He joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
4:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

It was dangerous! Explosions, injuries! No, not the war for Independence, but how we used to celebrate it. On today’s show, we went back a hundred years to see how Michiganders used to mark the 4th of July.

And, we spoke with Mardi Jo Link, author of the new book, "Bootstrapper: A Memoir. From Broke to Badass on a Northern Michigan Farm."

And, we looked into what’s behind the increase in backyard chicken farming here in Michigan.

Also, Andy Webb, owner of Captain Boom Fireworks in Otsego, joined us to talk about the new adjustment to the fireworks law.

And, we continued our week-long series of stories from immigrants about what America means to them. Today we talked to Koffi Itito. He fled the small West African nation of Togo in 2004. Now, he helps other refugees through his work at Freedom House in Detroit.

First on the show, to anyone who endured the dark days of the Great Recession with the near-death ordeals of General Motors and Chrysler, it seems nearly impossible to believe the "Help Wanted" sign is out at the car makers and their parts suppliers.

The Center for Automotive Research predicts the auto industry will add 35,000 jobs this year.  One auto supply executive calls it "an employee's market."

We wondered if this is a true hiring spree and if this can been seen as a return to the "glory days" of the car industry, or should we keep our collective guard up for fear of easily sliding back into the dark days of soft sales and layoffs?

David Cole, the Chairman Emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research, joined us today to discuss what’s behind these new jobs.

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