Stateside Staff

Pages

Politics & Culture
6:32 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, April 18th, 2013

Whether we like it or not, money sure seems to be the life-blood of politics.

On today's show, as first quarter campaign contributions have been filed to the Federal Election Commission, we'll check in on the "war-chests" of Michigan's Congressional delegation. And, we'll take a look back to the early 70's when streaking was an act of protest on college campuses. There were efforts to trivialize streaking - efforts to make it seem like just a "college" fad - but, in fact, there were much bigger motivations behind the craze.

But first, we began the hour in Lansing, where some controversial legislation is moving forward in the State House. Under a bill approved yesterday by a state House panel –the Families, Children and Seniors Committee---Michigan would begin suspicion-based drug-testing of people who receive welfare benefits. The legislation would allow the state to take away the benefits from people who test positive for drugs.

Under the measure, the drug testing program would go through a one-year trial period before being made permanent.

Jake Neher, reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network, was at the hearings. He gave us an update on this newest version of this legislation.

Read more
Stateside
6:30 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra revival through community outreach

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra rehearses on stage
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

The Great Recession presented a challenge to virtually every business and organization in Michigan.

During that time, it was either change the way you've always done things, or risk being swallowed up by the crumbling economy.

The Detroit Three automakers rose to the challenge and today, they're alive and thriving. And so did one of the state's cultural jewels: The Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

We recently spoke with DSO executive Vice President Paul Hogle and with Maestro Slatkin and it's clear that the mood is upbeat and optimistic at Orchestra Hall.

It was only two years when the Orchestra was amidst a very bitter musicians' strike ended. Since then good vibrations have been felt amongst the rank & file.

The DSO has been using various kinds of community outreach and increasing it's web presence.

It has been getting the brand out there all around the area and the world without spending a lot of money. It is setting an example that many other arts organizations and non-profits from around the state can learn from.

Daniel Howes made the DSO the centerpiece of his column today in the Detroit News. We spoke with him  to hear about the successes of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Listen to the full interview above.

Read more
Stateside
5:31 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

History can teach us a lot: What Detroit can learn from Atlanta

Andrew Young was Mayor of Atlanta for two terms in the 1980s
Sodexo USA/ Flickr

In the early 1980s, the city of Atlanta was known as the murder capitol of America. It's economy was flailing, much of the city was dangerous - the city needed help.

Sound familiar? 

The national image of Atlanta sounds alarmingly similar to how many Americans view the city of Detroit.

Read more
Stateside
5:30 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Creating just working conditions for restaurant workers

COLORS Detroit Facebook

'Colors-Detroit' is strengthening the city from the grassroots by providing job opportunities for the community’s unemployed residents.

Colors is not just any restaurant. It’s a restaurant with a strong mission to create fair and just working conditions for restaurant workers.

Colors is a project of the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Michigan, which is part of a nationwide movement to create fair and just working conditions for restaurant workers.

ROC-Michigan's research indicates that workers of color tend to be concentrated in the lowest-paying jobs in the restaurant industry and they are the ones most likely to have their rights violated.

Chef Phil Jones is head chef and general manager of Colors, which is located in the Paradise Valley area of downtown Detroit. You might know it as Harmonie Park  right near the Detroit Opera House.

Listen to the full interview above.

Read more
Stateside
5:30 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Where will the money come from to fix Michigan's roads?

Governor Snyder has been trying to get support from lawmakers to fix Michigan roads
Michael Gil Flickr

Governor Snyder says he wants more than a billion dollars just this year to pay for road and bridge repairs.

Our state has seriously bad roads that lawmakers in Lansing appear to agree on.

How to pay for road repairs is a whole other story.

We’ve talked a lot on Stateside about the different options to raise the money for these repairs.

Many Republicans appear unwilling to vote for any increase in taxes.  Amidst facing a possible primary challenge, would Republicans consider voting for any possible legislation?

There have also been concerns that this funding increase would mean local governments and schools would lose upwards of $850 million in funding.

For months, Governor Snyder has been trying to get support from lawmakers, but we haven’t seen a whole lot of progress on how to increase funding.

Recently, a state House committee has begun hearings on a road funding strategy.

Chris Gautz is the capitol correspondent for Crain's Detroit Business. He sat down with us on Stateside to give us the details of the new proposal and how exactly it would work.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
5:22 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

On today's show: we continue our look at road-funding Michigan.

There's a new proposal out this week in the state House that would shift the way we pay for road and bridge repairs, but can it really pass with both Democratic and Republican support?

Read more
Stateside
5:08 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Governer Snyder's take on Immigration reform

Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

The so-called gang of eight have released their immigration reform proposal.

The formal introduction of the bipartisan bill  known as the “Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013” was filed last night at 2 a.m.

The 844 piece of legislation would enact sweeping changes to the nation’s immigration laws.

President Obama says the bill is a compromise that doesn’t give everyone everything they want, but he’s urging the Senate to move forward with it.

So we took a look at the man who likes to call himself the nation’s most pro-immigration Governor - Gov. Rick Snyder.

Rick Pluta Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network was with the Governor this afternoon and tells us what he had to say about the introduction of this bill.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:07 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

'Already Dead Tapes' brings cassettes back to life

Cassette tapes were popular in the 70's and 80's
Wikipedia

As the old saying goes, "everything old is new again."

Case in point, the cassette tape.

Those of us who were music consumers in the 70's and 80's remember those cassettes rattling around in your glove compartment.

They were so much smaller than those clunky eight-track tapes and no skipping or gunk on the needles like your vinyl records.

Many people went through the cassette era  making their own mixes, working from a dual-tape unit and sharing them with friends, family and significant others.

Then came the CD, into prominence in the mid to late 80s. It was great to be able to jump right to the spot you wanted -no more fast forward and rewind.

Soon after the CD, the mp3 became popular and that is when the cassette tape became, for all intents and purposes, extinct.

But recently, the cassette tape is being revived and a Michigan-based recording label called 'Already Dead Tapes' is right out in front of this revival.

The label is run from Kalamazoo by Sean Hartman along with his Chicago-based partner Joshua Tabbia.

Sean and Joshua have said they don't think of Already Dead Tapes as a business because it's a "passion project."

Here is a video of Already Dead Tapes via the Chicago AV Club:

Read more
Arts & Culture
5:13 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Sitting down with Red Tail Ring

Red Tail Ring in the studios at Michigan Radio
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

We’ve all heard the term “comfort food”. Well how about some “comfort music”?
 
Red Tail Ring  is a duo from Kalamazoo serving up American roots music that harkens back to gentler days, and it’s music that soothes and wraps around you like a shawl.
 
Red Tail Ring is Michael Beauchamp and Laurel Premo and they join us here in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Read more
Politics & Culture
5:13 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

There are more than 37,000 homeless students in Michigan. That's up 66 percent in the last four years. On today's show, we ask why is homelessness among students on the rise even as the state economy heads towards recovery.

Later in the hour, we're joined in the studio by Red-Tail-Ring - a Kalamazoo duo serving up American roots music.

We first look at the subject of sick-leave and requiring employers to provide sick-days to their workers.

Lawmakers in Lansing are moving to block local cities and towns from passing any laws requiring businesses to offer sick leave to their workers.

Such laws have been passed in Seattle, San Francisco and several other major cities. The entire state of Connecticut, and New York City are expected to soon pass a sick leave ordinance.

Backers of these "paid sick leave" ordinances say they're designed to protect people in lower-paying jobs - the workers who stand to lose their jobs if they try to call in sick.

Republican Representative Earl Poleski of Jackson is sponsoring one of the bills that would block local governments from putting paid sick leave ordinances into place.

He joined us to talk about his bill.

Arts & Culture
5:12 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

The power of the handwritten letter

The shelves at Open Books. The Chicago nonprofit is working to improve literacy rates in the city.
Open Books

In an era when we dash off a quick email or text message or a tweet, and often just as quickly deleted, the magic of a letter is something that has sadly been eclipsed.

The letter: the construction of thoughts, put down on paper, sometimes typed, sometimes hand-written, with a signature that is distinct and personal. It's something that lives on through the years. You just don't get that with a 140-character tweet.

Today we have a story that proves that letters can pack incredible power long after they have been written, long after the writers have left this earth.

Read more
Politics & Government
5:12 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Blocking cities from adopting paid sick leave ordinances

Chicken noodle soup and medication.
Robert Couse-Baker Creative Commons

Lawmakers in Lansing are moving to block local cities and towns from passing any laws requiring businesses to offer sick leave to their workers.

Such laws have been passed in Seattle, San Francisco and several other major cities. The entire state of Connecticut, and New York City are expected to soon pass a sick leave ordinance.

Backers of these "paid sick leave" ordinances say they're designed to protect people in lower-paying jobs - the workers who stand to lose their jobs if they try to call in sick.

Republican Representative Earl Poleski of Jackson is sponsoring one of the bills that would block local governments from putting paid sick leave ordinances into place.

He joined us to talk about his bill.

Listen to the full interview above.

Economy
5:12 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Getting through school when you have no home

Poverty has doubled in Livingston County over the last 5 years
SamPac creative commons

If you could walk into any school in Michigan and look around at the students, you might not realize it, but somewhere in there you would see students who are homeless.

There are more than 37,500 homeless students in Michigan, and that's up 66 percent in the past four years. So, even as the economy begins to struggle its way toward recovery in Michigan, we have a rising number of homeless students trying to struggle their way through school.

Joining us to talk about the challenges that homelessness poses to students and to the school districts are Angela Parth, the executive director of "The Connection Youth Services" in Livingston County, and Holly Fiedler, the homeless Liaison and Social Worker at Milan Area Schools.

Listen to the full interview above.

Read more
Politics & Culture
9:42 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Stateside for Monday, April 15th, 2013

On today's Stateside, we look beyond the debate over road funding and take a look at just how - if Governor Snyder gets his proposed $1.2 billion in transportation funding - the money will be spent: Just who would get the majority share of that money and who decides where repair funding goes?

Read more
Stateside
3:39 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Is this normal-ish Michigan weather?

Midwest weather makes 'normal' something hard to define
user thebridge Michigan Radio

Why is it so cold this spring?

Jeff Masters, PhD, Director of Meterology at Weather Underground, tried to shed some light on our slow seasons.

Read more
Stateside
3:29 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

A letter to Congress from 55 state officials demands immigration reform

Rashida Tlaib is one of 55 elected officials from Michigan who called upon Congress for immigration reform

Rashida Tlaib (D) is a state representative from the 6th district and is one of 55 state and local officials who wrote a letter to four big names in Washington D.C.

Tlaib and others called on John Boehner (House Speaker), Nancy Pelosi (House Minority Leader), Harry Reid (Senate Majority Leader) and Mitch McConnell (Senate Minority Leader) to help lead the way on our country's immigration policies.

Read more
Stateside
3:00 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Four short and sweet books you should read this spring

Michigan writer and poet Keith Taylor
Robert Turney

Let's cross our fingers and hope that spring is here to stay. As the grass gets greener and flowers begin blooming, why not welcome the warmer weather with some light spring reading?

Keith Taylor, a poet and writer, as well as a professor at the University of Michigan, has given us a few suggestions for our spring reading lists.

Don't worry, they're short.

"We should be getting outside, and working in the garden...we don't want to start reading Anna Karenina outside right now," Taylor said.

Read more
Politics & Culture
5:03 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, April 11th, 2013

As the national debate over gun control continues, we take a look at just how pervasive gun violence is here in Michigan.

We also look at efforts to regulate Mixed Martial Arts fighting in Michigan.

And zombies are taking over MSU. Students are fighting back... with nerf guns (they work on zombies).

Later in the show, we meet a writer and fisherman who finds his inspiration in the Detroit River.

But first, we check-in with Daniel Howes, columnist at the Detroit News, about Gov. Rick Snyder's relationship with those in his party.

Politics & Culture
5:03 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Diving into Michigan's gun culture

The Lansing library system says Michigan's open-carry of weapons law does not apply to its facilities.
flickr

All this week, Bridge Magazine has run a series of in-depth stories delving into Michigan's gun culture.

Guns in Michigan explores a wide range of questions including what happens at the point where gun rights and public safety intersect?

And how pervasive is gun violence in Michigan?

Pat Shellenbarger wrote the series.

He's a writer based in West Michigan. If his name sounds familiar, it could be because he was a reporter and editor at the Detroit News as well as The Grand Rapids Press and the St Petersburg Times.

He joined us on Stateside today, listen to the audio above.

Read more
Stateside
5:00 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Attention: Zombies infiltrate MSU campus

Spartans are fighting for their lives as zombies raid MSU's campus this week. (Nerf darts are to zombies as silver bullets are to werewolves.)
YouTube

The zombie apocalypse has spread to Spartan Nation.

This week, hundreds of Michigan State students are participating in the third annual "Spartans versus Zombies" game.

Here's an 'informational video':

Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty spoke with Shannon Mazurie, who helped bring the game to campus and is the organizer of this year's event.

Listen to the audio above to find out if and how Spartans are surviving, how zombies "eat" humans, and how Spartans manage to make it to class with zombies chasing them.

Pages