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Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint voters will decide if they want to make changes to their city charter on August 8.

If it passes, it will be the first time the city’s charter will be changed in four decades. A special panel has spent two years designing the 83-page charter update.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Western Lake Erie may see the third largest cyanobacterial bloom in the past 15 years this summer.

The Lake Erie forecast was released Thursday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which funds the research.

Cyanobacteria is fed by runoff from farmers’ fields and urban sources.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A national crackdown on health care fraud has landed dozens of people in Michigan in trouble with the law.

The Medicare Fraud Strike Force, jointly run by the U.S. Justice and the Health and Human Services departments, has charged more than 400 defendants nationwide of fraud amounting to more than a billion dollars.

In Michigan, 32 people face charges, including fraud, kickbacks, money laundering and drug diversion schemes involving approximately $218 million in false claims for services that were medically unnecessary or never rendered.

The Swanson Funeral Home sign in front of its Flint building.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State regulators have shut down a Flint funeral home for keeping bodies in unspeakably bad conditions.

On its website, Swanson Funeral Home talks about it serving the local community for more than a half century, honoring the dead, and respecting the living.

But according to the state Securities & Commercial Licensing Bureau, funeral home employees left  human bodies stored in an un-air-conditioned garage, in some cases for up to five months.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint police officers blocked water crisis protesters from entering Flint city hall today.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Congress is taking a step toward fully restoring funding for a program to clean up pollution in the Great Lakes region.

Federal agencies use Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) resources to target the biggest threats to the Great Lakes ecosystem. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Genesee County prosecutors are reviewing the case against a Flint city councilman who allegedly pawned his city issued laptop.

Councilman Eric Mays admits he pawned the laptop for $100. He later reclaimed it. He told a Flint-based web news outlet that he didn’t consider pawning the laptop was “criminal.”

“I think it just shows I’m poor,” Mays told Flint Beat. 

Samples of various drinking water pipes.
Rebecca Williams / Michigan Radio

Flint’s problem water pipe records are forcing the city to rely more on a special tool to determine if homes are using lead or copper service lines.

Digging a hole with a backhoe to see if the pipe connecting homes to city water mains is slow and expensive. It's not something a city like Flint, which is replacing thousands of suspect service lines, has time or money to do.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The city of Flint has three dozen new firefighters.  

They were sworn in today.

Family and friends packed the auditorium to see Flint’s newest firemen be sworn in. Some had the honor of pinning on the new firefighters' badges. 

Fire Chief Ray Barton is happy to see the ranks of his department not only increase by 50%, but also grow younger. He says the average age of the new recruits is in the mid-20s, while Flint’s veteran firefighters’ average age is in the mid-40s.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has eight teams surveying damage in four mid-Michigan counties hard hit by flooding last month.  

The FEMA assessment will play a large role in the state’s expected request for federal disaster relief.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint city council members say the “fix was in” for months before a deal to keep the city on tap water from Detroit was made public.

Councilwoman Kate Fields says she’s obtained an email from a consultant showing the deal with the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) was set in February, months before it was announced to the public in April. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The man accused of stabbing a police officer at the Flint airport last month now faces up to life in prison.

In a clear, confident voice, Amor Ftouhi said “Allahu Akbar” a half dozen times as he entered the federal courtroom for his arraignment. The only other times he spoke were to tell the judge he understood the charges against him.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

 Homes sales in Michigan is becoming a seller’s market.

After languishing for years, Michigan’s real estate market is apparently turning in favor of home sellers.

Darin Blomquist is with Attom Data Solutions, which tracks the real estate market.  Blomquist says home sale prices are improving in Michigan, including in parts of the state you wouldn’t expect.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Tomorrow, the man charged in a suspected terrorist attack at Flint’s airport will be back in court.    

Today, the police officer stabbed in the incident rode in a Fourth of July parade in Fenton.

Just behind a Lake Fenton church group and a boy scout troop, Lt. Jeff Neville rode in a SUV, waving to the crowds and giving a thumbs up. He rode as part of a float honoring fallen police officers.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Primary voters in Flint, Dearborn, Ann Arbor, Grand Rapids and Lansing are among those casting ballots in the August election. In addition to local municipal elections, there are two special primary elections to fill vacant state house seats in August. 

“You know I think we’re going to be in the 13% to 16% overall turnout range,” says Lansing City Clerk Chris Swope.

Swope says absentee ballots are a growing percentage of the vote in the Capitol City.

picture of Dow chemical company sign
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Dow-DuPont merger is moving to a conclusion.

Last week, the proposed $130 billion merger cleared its last major regulatory hurdle.

Canadian regulators joined their counterparts in the U.S., China, Brazil, Australia, India and the European Union in giving their blessing.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A college education is getting more expensive in the state of Michigan.

Last month, many Michigan colleges and universities approved tuition increases for this fall.  And starting today, interest rates on federally backed student loans are rising too.  

Interest rates on loans for undergrads are rising from 3.76% to 4.45%.   Overtime, that increase will add hundreds, if not thousands of dollars, to the cost of getting a degree.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Federal officials say $15 million is going to provide health and social services for people who have had or are at risk for lead exposure stemming from the Flint water crisis.

“We understand the urgency of the situation, and this funding will help connect affected and at-risk Flint residents to comprehensive health and social services proven to mitigate the effects of lead exposure,” says U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.
 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A campaign to oust Flint’s mayor from office reached a milestone today.  

This afternoon, recall campaign organizers dropped off nearly nine thousand petition signatures with the Genesee County clerk’s office. If there are enough valid signatures, Flint residents could vote as early as November on the recall.

Todd Flood
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

More charges may be coming in the Flint water investigation.

Special Counsel Todd Flood hinted at the possibility of new charges during a hearing for a defendant facing an involuntary manslaughter charge in connection with a fatal Legionnaires' disease case.  

Michigan Agri-Business Association

Michigan agri-business leaders say recent floods have devastated farm fields and heavily damaged rural infrastructure in several mid-Michigan counties.

More than seven inches of rain fell on parts of mid-Michigan last Thursday. Water inundated farmers’ fields. Dry beans appear to be the hardest hit crop, with about 10% of the crop lost, according to state agriculture industry officials.

Jim Byrum is the president of the Michigan Agri-Business Association.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

FEMA will soon take part in a joint preliminary damage assessment of four Michigan counties hard hit by flooding this month.

Gov. Rick Snyder asked federal disaster officials to assist with a review of damage and response costs to flooding in Bay, Gladwin, Isabella and Midland counties.

U.S. Attorney General's office

The man charged in a suspected terrorist attack at Flint’s airport will spend the Independence Day weekend behind bars.

In a calm voice, Amor Ftouhi said “Allahu Akbar” twice as he entered a federal courtroom in Flint this morning. Ftouhi was shackled and wearing an orange jumpsuit. He also wore a small surgical mask which a court spokesman says is for "unspecified health reasons."

Ftouhi is from Montreal.  He has joint Canadian-Tunisian citizenship. 

The hearing was to determine if a judge would grant bail for the man accused to stabbing a police officer at Flint’s Bishop International Airport.  The officer is recovering from a 12-inch gash to his neck.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Thousands of delinquent Flint water customers are once again at risk of losing their homes.

Today, a state oversight board struck down a moratorium on putting unpaid water bills on county tax rolls.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Defense attorneys oppose a move by prosecutors to consolidate Flint water crisis criminal cases.

Michigan's Chief Medical Executive, Dr. Eden Wells, is charged with “obstruction of justice” and “lying to an officer” in connection with a Legionnaires' Disease outbreak during Flint’s tap water crisis.  She made a brief appearance in court today in Flint.   

During the hearing, prosecutors raised the potential of consolidating all the ongoing criminal cases in the Flint water probe into one court. Currently, the 13 cases are spread among several different judges in 67th district court. 

Dredging the Flint River.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A century-old legacy of Flint’s industrial past is the focus of a major cleanup project this summer.

The Flint River is the main artery flowing through Flint’s industrial heart. For decades, from the late 1800’s and into the 1920’s, a gasification plant located along the river turned coal into much-needed natural gas.

A sign that says "City of Flint Municipal Center"
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint city council members say they need more information before they can approve the agreement with the Great Lakes Water Authority. The 30-year deal is part of a broader agreement addressing Flint's water crisis.  The council did approve a three month extension of the current contract instead.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder is concerned about what a Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act will mean for tens of thousands of Michiganders on Medicaid.

Today, U.S. Senate Republicans issued a revised version of their health care bill. The changes include a penalty for people who let their insurance lapse. 

Gov. Rick Snyder exits a Michigan State Police helicopter after a tour of flooded parts of Isabella and Midland counties.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Snyder says it’s important for Michiganders to “rally together” in the wake of flooding in Isabella and Midland counties.

More than seven inches of rain Thursday caused rivers to burst from their banks, inundate neighborhoods and wash out roads.

This morning, the governor spent time inspecting the flood damage on the ground and from the air. Snyder saw many parts of the region are still underwater.

A recall petition for Flint Mayor Karen Weaver.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A recall petition targeting Flint’s mayor reaches a milestone this week.

Recall organizer Arthur Woodson declined to comment last week on the status of the campaign. However, in the past Woodson has said volunteers have collected more than 6,000 signatures since a judge cleared the way for recall petition process to begin in April.

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