Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.


What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Fans will notice enhanced security at this week’s U of M - Ohio State football game.  

There will be a lot on the line on the field at the Big House when the Wolverines and the Buckeyes face off on Saturday.

The lines to get in will be big too.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, a judge will consider whether the city of Flint may resume shutting off water to people who haven’t paid their bills.

In August, Genesee Circuit Judge Archie Hayman ordered the city of Flint to stop disconnecting delinquent water customers. The judge found the city had illegally increased rates in 2011 and directed the city to rollback the 35% increase. 

Since September, Flint water customers have been paying the lower rate. But not everyone has been paying. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Nearly two years ago, a massive ice storm knocked out power for more than a week to thousands of people in Lansing.  The utility company is promising in a new report it won’t happen again.

Just before Christmas, 2013, an ice storm knocked out power to 40,000 Lansing Board of Water &Light customers.  Many were still without power on New Year’s Eve.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan State University will release plans later today to show it is trying to address the needs of African-American students. 

But some black Spartans feel the university is not doing enough.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Former President Bill Clinton praised the international response to last week’s terrorist attacks on Paris during a speech in East Lansing Wednesday night.

Clinton was at Michigan State University to be honored for his lifetime of public service. But he also spoke about the need to defeat ISIS.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A federal lawsuit accuses Michigan State University of mishandling sexual assault complaints.

The lawsuit is being brought by four women, all seniors at MSU, who claim the university dragged out investigations into their sexual assault complaints.    

The suit claims the university’s mishandling of the cases violated provisions of Title IX.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The recent wave of terrorist attacks in Europe and the Middle East have police reviewing their security plans for big events, including a major holiday event this Friday in downtown Lansing.

Up to 80,000 people are expected to head to Lansing Friday night for the annual Silver Bells event, which includes a parade and lighting of the state Christmas tree on the Capitol grounds. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s public works director has resigned.

Howard Croft played a highly visible role in the city’s drinking water crisis.

Appointed by Flint’s emergency manager in 2011, Croft oversaw the city’s switch from Detroit water to the Flint River, and back again after serious problems developed from the river water. 

“They are well protected…but not absolutely,” says attorney Michael Pitt.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Attorneys are hoping to sign up tens of thousands of Flint water customers for a class action lawsuit against the city and state.

The suit was filed Friday on behalf of four families.  

Attorney Trachelle Young says they are seeking damages for people suffering health problems because of Flint’s problem-plagued drinking water.

“I don’t think the community has any idea how truly extensive the damages are,” says Young.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new poll shows strong support for restrictions on e-cigarettes. 

But industry group say more restrictions may create a kind of regulatory “prohibition”.

The latest C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan finds a majority of parents and teens agree that e-cigarettes should be restricted in public spaces, come with health warnings and be taxed like conventional cigarettes.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Backers of a ban on fracking in Michigan will deliver hundreds of thousands of petition signatures to the Secretary of State’s office this week.

Supporters need to collect a quarter million signatures to ask voters next year to approve a ban on hydraulic fracturing in Michigan.

Hydraulic fracturing is a process used in nine out of 10 natural gas wells in the United States, where millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals are pumped underground to break apart the rock and release the gas.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Firearm deer season is underway today in Michigan.

The hunt is giving state wildlife officials a chance to expand the search for more cases of chronic wasting disease.

In April, a 6 year old doe tested positive for CWD, a fatal neurological disease. It was the first case of a free ranging deer coming down with the disease. Since then, two more deer have tested positive. All three deer were from Ingham County and were related.    

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s senior U.S. Senator wants a top level meeting with Canadian officials to raise objections to a planned nuclear waste dump near Lake Huron.

The election of a new Canadian government is raising hope among opponents of a plan to build the waste dump less than a mile from the shore of Lake Huron.

Michigan Senator Debbie Stabenow says she’s working with the U.S. ambassador to Canada to set up a meeting with the new Canadian environment minister.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s water crisis is now the subject of a federal lawsuit.

The lawsuit filed on behalf of four families was filed Friday.

The lawsuit singles out 14 state and local officials FOR “reckless” conduct connected to the decision to switch to and stay with the Flint River for the city’s drinking water source.  The lawsuit names Gov. Rick Snyder, former Flint Mayor Dayne Walling and former emergency manager Darnell Earley, among others.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Dozens of families turned up for free blood lead level testing in Flint today.

Nurses tried to soothe the fears of toddlers, telling them “it’s just a little poke” before using a small lancet to prick the child’s finger.   

Many of the children were not soothed. But many parents hope the clinic will ease some of their worries.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s presidential primary ballot will begin to shape up this week.

Michigan’s Republican and Democratic presidential primaries are March 8. 

But who gets a spot on the ballot? Hundreds of people are running for president of the United States. Of course, you’ve heard of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. But how about John Blyth or Mike Diggs?

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Veterans’ Day observances are taking place across Michigan today.   

On this day, many vets are still struggling with old wounds and new obstacles to getting help. 

EPA region 5 director Susan Hedman (file photo).
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A federal agency will review how the state of Michigan monitors local drinking water.

Regional EPA administrator Susan Hedman says her agency will conduct an audit of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s drinking water program.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

New tests suggest high lead levels in the drinking water at one Flint school may have a simple and inexpensive solution.

Initial test results on drinking water samples taken at Freeman Elementary showed high levels of lead in the water: 101 parts per billion or roughly six times the federal action level for lead in tap water.

Follow-up tests were conducted last month on water at four Flint schools that tested at or above the federal action level. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A meeting this week may help produce an update into a possible federal probe of Flint’s water problems.

Congressman Dan Kildee says he plans to meet this week with Regional EPA director Susan Hedman to discuss the status of an investigation into Flint’s drinking water problems.

Kildee says the investigation has to look beyond just assessing blame.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s new mayor says she wants her city to return to total local control.

Soon after Karen Weaver took her oath of office as Flint mayor, she called on Governor Snyder re-instate total local control in her city.

“I do not embrace the current governance model on a moral or political basis,” Weaver told the standing room crowd that packed the city council chambers to watch her take her oath of office. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A one-man effort to recall Governor Rick Snyder from office faces a big hurdle this week.

Angelo Brown says Governor Snyder deserves to be recalled because of the role his administration played in the Flint drinking water crisis.

Brown’s recall petition accuses the governor of being “culpable” in the decisions that lead to the use of corrosive Flint River water as the city’s drinking water source. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s new mayor will be sworn into office at noon Monday.

Karen Weaver started the year as a Flint businesswoman.  She’ll end it as Flint’s mayor. 

Weaver defeated incumbent Mayor Dayne Walling in last week’s election.

Weaver emerged as the least known of a four person field in the August primary and campaigned hard on the city’s water problems.

When she takes the oath of office, she’ll become the first woman elected mayor in Flint.

Weaver will be mayor of a city still under control of a state oversight board. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint Mayor-elect Karen Weaver will be sworn in on Monday.   But she’s starting with less power than her predecessors.

When he took office six years ago, outgoing mayor Dayne Walling appointed more than a dozen top city officials.   But incoming mayor Karen Weaver can not appoint a single department head.

One of the last decisions by Flint’s last emergency manager was to give all personnel decisions to the city administrator. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint school officials will hold a lead education session next week.

Preliminary tests showed 4 of 13 Flint schools had lead levels in their drinking water at or above the federal action level. Results from more in-depth testing should be released next week.

Next Thursday, Flint Community Schools, along with the Genesee County Health Department will hold an information session for parents of children five and under.

The office of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

Michigan’s two United States Senators have sent a letter to Canada’s new prime minister to kill plans for a nuclear waste dump along Lake Huron.

The plans call for nuclear waste storage facility less than a mile from the shore of Lake Huron.

The former Conservative prime minister’s government was supportive of the plan. But the Conservatives lost a recent election to the Liberal Party. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Beginning next month, the city of Flint plans to again disconnect water customers who aren’t paying their bills. 

The first shutoff notices are going out this week.

This summer, Judge Archie Hayman judge ordered Flint to stop shutting off water service to delinquent customers. The judge found Flint illegally raised rates by 35% in 2011. As part of his ruling, the judge ordered the city to roll back the water rates and stop disconnecting people who had run up unpaid bills under the old rate structure. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

After six years at city hall, Flint Mayor Dayne Walling only has a few days to clean out his office to make way for his successor. 

Walling lost his bid for a third term yesterday. Political newcomer Karen Weaver defeated Walling by nearly 2,000 votes.  She’ll be sworn in next week. 


Ohio voters resoundingly rejected a proposal to legalize recreational marijuana on Tuesday.  But that’s not deterring a similar campaign in Michigan.

Failure of the proposed constitutional amendment follows an expensive campaign, a legal fight over its ballot wording, and an investigation into the proposal's petition signatures.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint voters have chosen a new mayor.

Karen Weaver was surrounded by jubilant supporters last night as she rolled to victory in Flint’s mayor’s race.

Weaver, a political newcomer, defeated six-year incumbent Dayne Walling by a convincing margin. 

“We voted for change so some things have to be different,” says Weaver, “but at this point I want to start with putting together a team so we can look and see what we need to do.”

During the campaign, Weaver repeatedly hammered Walling on his handling of the city’s drinking water crisis.