Stateside
4:00 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

How do Michigan Catholics view Pope Francis?

It has been seven months since the Archbishop of Buenos Aires, Jorge Mario Bergoglio was chosen as the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church.

He took the name Francis. And since then, the Argentinean pontiff has caught the world's attention, ruffling more than a few conservative feathers with his words on abortion and gay rights, attempts to reform the way the Vatican runs, and how the Catholic Church connects with the people.

We wondered how much impact Pope Francis is having on Catholics in Michigan, and how he’s seen by members of other religions.

We began the conversation with Dave Willey, the Rome correspondent for the BBC.

Then, we hear from Jesuit priest Father Karl Kiser, and Baptist minister Ural Hill.

Father Karl Kiser received his Master's of Divinity from Boston College. He is an educator who is the President of the University of Detroit Jesuit High School and Academy, located on Detroit's Northwest Side and he ministers to congregations at parishes within the Archdiocese of Detroit. 

The Reverend Doctor Ural Hill earned his Master of Divinity Degree from the Interdenominational Theological Center's Baptist School of Theology in Atlanta. He was ordained in 1992 at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. He is a preacher, psychologist and counselor. Among his many activities, he is the Pastor of Peace Baptist Church in Ann Arbor and the president of H.O.T.E.P Christian services, a non-profit community mental health group serving families in Metro Detroit. He teaches and ministers in the Detroit area.

Listen to the full story above.