Most customers think their new car dealers are honest

Mar 13, 2011

Most people think their dealerships are being honest about recommended repair and maintenance work.  That’s  according to an annual survey by J.D. Power.  

J.D. Power says only 7% of people say their dealer tried to sell them maintenance or repairs they didn’t need.  The practice is called “upselling.”

Research director John Obsborn says customers’ satisfaction with dealerships has been steadily improving for a decade:

" Unfortunately there are many stereotypes out there about the dealers -- but our data indicates that they provide high levels of satisfaction both in the servicing of vehicles and the selling of vehicles."

Osborn says vehicle quality has also been improving for the past ten years – and that tends to increase people’s satisfaction with their dealerships, who don’t have to give customers bad news in the form of high repair bills as often.   

The survey found little difference among perceptions of upselling between brands, luxury and non-luxury vehicles, or between men and women. 

Younger customers were, however, more likely to think their dealership was trying to sell them an unnecessary repair or maintenance.